c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from a pdf document application software utility azure html winforms visual studio Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi2-part486

xx
SYMBOLS
Symbols for Mathematical Variables Used in This Book
Variable
Parameter
Unit
A
area
cm2
A
gain (without feedback)
dB
A`
gain (with feedback)
dB
A
c
cross-sectional area of center pole (transformer core)
cm2
A
cp
area of center pole (transformer core)
cm2
A
e
effective area (of core)
cm2
A
g
area of air gap (in core)
cm2
A
L
inductance factor (inductance of a single turn)
nH
A
m
minimum area of core
cm2
A
n
attenuation factor
A
p
area of center pole (of core )
cm2
A
p`
area of primary winding
cm2
AP
area product of core (A
w
A
e
)
cm4
AP
e
effective area product (A
wb
A
e
)
cm4
A
r
resistance factor (bobbin); also attenuation factor
A
w
winding window area (of core)
cm2
A
wb
winding window area (of bobbin)
cm2
A
we
effective area of copper in winding (total)
cm2
A
wp
primary winding window area 
cm2
A
s
surface area
cm2
A
x
area of copper (for a single wire)
cm2
B
magnetic flux density
mT
ˆ
B
peak magnetic flux density
mT
D
feedback factor
$B
small change in B
mT
$B
ac
magnetic flux density swing (p–p)
mT
B
dc
steady-state magnetic flux density (due to H
dc
)
mT
B
opt
optimum flux density swing (for minimum loss)
mT
B
r
remanence flux density
mT
B
s
saturation flux density
mT
B
w
peak (working) value of flux density 
mT
b
w
useful winding width (of bobbin)
mm
C
capacitance
OF
C
c
leakage (parasitic) capacitance
pF
cfm
cubic feet per minute (of air flow)
cfm
C
h
heat (storage) capacity 
Ws/in3/°C
C
k
interelectrode capacitance
pF
C
p
parasitic coupling capacitance 
pF
D
duty ratio (t
on
/t
p
)
d`
duty cycle (t
on
/t
off
)
D`
D`(1 – D)  “off” time
dB
logarithmic ratio (voltage 20 log
10
V
1
/V
2
or power 10 log
10
P
1
/P
2
)
dB
dB
m
logarithmic power ratio with respect to 1 mW (10 log
10
P
1
/1 mW)
dB
di/dt
rate of change of current with respect to time
A/s
di
p
/dt
rate of change of primary current with respect to time
A/s
di
s
/dt
rate of change of secondary current with respect to time
A/s
Delete pages from a pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy page from pdf; delete blank pages in pdf online
Delete pages from a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf online; delete a page from a pdf file
SYMBOLS
xxi
Symbols for Mathematical Variables Used in This Book (cont.)
Variable
Parameter
Unit
dv/dt
rate of change of voltage with respect to time
V/s
d
w
wire diameter
mm
e
emf, induced electromotive force (vector quantity)
V
e`
radiant emissivity of surface
|e|
emf (magnitude of emf only)
V
U
electrical energy 
J
f
frequency
Hz
F
1
layer factor (copper)
F
r
ratio of ac/DC resistance (of winding)
H
magnetic field strength
Oe
ˆ
H
peak value of effective magnetic field strength
Oe
h
conductor thickness (strip) or wire diameter
mm
H
ac
magnetic field strength swing, p–p
Oe
H
dc
magnetic field strength due to Dc current 
Oe
H
opt
optimum value of magnetic field strength
Oe
H
s
saturating value of magnetic field strength
Oe
$H
small change in magnetic field strength
Oe
I
current flow (DC)
A
I
rms current (ac)
A
ˆ
I
peak current
A
I
ave
average value of current for a defined period
A
I
cp
peak collector current
A
I
dc
direct current (dependent variable)
A
I
e
effective input current
A
I
i
harmonic interference current
A
I
L
inductor or choke current (average)
A
i
L
ac inductor current
A
I
L(p–p)
ripple current p–p in choke or inductor
A
I
max
maximum value of current
A
I
mean
time-averaged current value
A
I
min
minimum value of current
A
I
p
primary current (in transformer)
A
I
s
secondary current (also snubber current )
A
$I
small change in current 
A
I2R
resistive power loss
W
J
current density (in wire)
A/cm2
jWC
capacitive reactance, (complex #)
7
jWL
inductive reactance, (complex #)
7
K`
copper utilization factor (topology factor)
K
m
material constant
K
p
primary area factor
K
t
primary rms current factor
K
u
packing factor (of wire)
%
K
ub
utilization factor of bobbin 
L
Inductance (self-inductance of wound component)
H
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
delete pages from pdf online; delete page in pdf online
xxii
SYMBOLS
Symbols for Mathematical Variables Used in This Book (cont.)
Variable
Parameter
Unit
l
length (of magnetic path)
cm
l
e
effective path length
cm
l
g
total length in core air gap 
cm
L
LP
primary leakage inductance
OH
L
Ls
secondary leakage inductance
OH
L
LT
total (transformer) leakage inductance
OH
l
m
mean length of wire turn or magnetic path (of core)
cm
L
p
primary inductance
mH
L
s
secondary inductance
mH
mmf
magnetomotive force (magnetic potential ampere-turns)
At
N
number of turns
N
fb
number of turns of feedback winding
N
min
minimum number of turns (to prevent core saturation)
N
mpp
minimum primary turns for p-p operation
N
p
primary turns (of transformer)
N
s
secondary turns (of transformer)
N
v
turns per volt (of transformer)
T/V
N
w
number of turns (or wires) per layer
P
power
W
p
period (of time)
Os
P
c
power dissipated in core
W
P
f
power factor (ratio true power/VA)
P
in
true input power (VI cos Q, or VA rP
f
, heating effect)
W
P
id
total internal dissipation 
W
P
j
heat dissipation at junction, J/s
W
P
out
true output power (VI cos Q, or VA rP
f
, heating effect)
W
P
q1
power dissipated in transistor Q1
W
P
t
total internal dissipation
W
P
v
/N
primary volts per turn
V/T
P
w
winding copper loss
W
Q
rate of heat flow (in watts by conduction or in 
W
J/s/in2 by radiation)
J/s
R
resistance
7
r
radius (or wire)
mm
R
Cu
DC resistance of wound component at specified 
temperature
7
R
e
effective DC resistance of transformer winding
7
R
c–h
thermal resistance, case to heat exchanger
°C/W
R
h–a
thermal resistance, heat exchanger to free air 
°C/W
R
j–c
thermal resistance, junction to case
°C/W
R
o
total thermal resistance
°C/W
R
s
effective resistance of prime source or network
7
R
sf
effective source resistance factor (R
sf
R
s
rW
out
)
7
RT
temperature coefficient of resistance (copper  0.00393 
at 0°C)
7/7/°C
RT
cm
resistance of wire in 7/cm at temp T, °C
7/cm
R
Q
thermal resistance (of heat-conducting path)
°C/W
R
Qja
thermal resistance, junction hot spot to free air
°C/W
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Create the new document with 3 pages. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
delete page from pdf document; delete pdf pages in reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Create the new document with 3 pages. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" newDoc.Save(outputFilePath).
delete page in pdf preview; delete page from pdf file
SYMBOLS
xxiii
Symbols for Mathematical Variables Used in This Book (cont.)
Variable
Parameter
Unit
R
w
effective resistance of wound component at frequency f
7
R
x
resistance factor of bobbin
S
f
scaling factor 
T
temperature in degrees Celsius
°C
t
time
s
T
amb
ambient temperature (of air)
°C
T
c
temperature of copper (winding)
°C
t
d
time delay period
s
T
ds
temperature of surface (diode)
°C
t
f
fall time (time required for voltage or current decay)
Os
T
h
temperature of heat exchanger surface
°C
t
p
total period (of time), i.e., duration of single cycle 
Os
t
off
non-conducting “off” time period
Os
t
on
conducting “on” time period
Os
$T
small change in temperature
°C
$T
a
small temperature rise (above ambient)
°C
$t
small increment of time
Os
T
r
temperature rise (above ambient)
°C
VA
volt-ampere product (apparent power)
VA
V
c
transistor collector voltage
V
V
cc
supply line (voltage)
V
V
ce
voltage, collector to emitter
V
V
ceo
collector-to-emitter breakdown voltage (base open circuit)
V
V
cer
collector-to-emitter breakdown voltage (with specified 
base-to-emitter resistance)
V
V
cex
collector-to-emitter breakdown voltage (base reverse-biased)
V
V
e
effective volume of core 
cm3
V
fb
feedback voltage
V
V
h
header voltage (voltage at input of regulator)
V
V
hi
harmonic interference voltage, rms
Vrms
V
in
input voltage
V
V
t
voltage across inductor
V
V
m
mean voltage
V
V
n
nominal (average normal) voltage
V
V/N
volts per turn
V/T
V
o
ripple voltage
V
V
out
output voltage
V
V
p
peak voltage or primary voltage
V
V
p–p
ripple voltage, peak-peak value
V
V
ref
reference voltage
V
V
rms
root mean square voltage
Vrms
V
sat
saturation voltage
V
X
c
capacitive reactance 
7
X
L
inductive reactance 
7
T
volume resistivity of copper (at 0°C  1.588 O7-cm)
O7-cm
T
tc
resistivity of copper at t
c
°C 
O7-cm
O
0
permeability of space (4R 10–7 H/m)
Vs/Am
O
r
relative permeability (of core)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pdf pages android; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete page in pdf reader; delete pages pdf
xxiv
SYMBOLS
Symbols for Mathematical Variables Used in This Book (cont.)
Variable
Parameter
Unit
O
x
effective permeability (after gap is introduced)
J
efficiency (power output/power input r 100%)
%
$
a small increment (change); also skin thickness, mm
mm
$&
a small change in total flux
&
L
effective conductor height
mm
&
total magnetic flux, Wb
Vs
Y
angular velocity (Y  2Rf)
rad/s
0V
zero voltage reference line (often the common output)
V
1 – D
1 – duty ratio (the “off” period)
s
|x|
magnitude of function (x) only
Abbreviations 
ac alternating current
AIEE
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
AWG
American wire gauge
B/H
(curve) hysteresis loop of magnetic material
CISPR
Comité International Spécial des Perturbations Radioélectriques
CSA
Canadian Standards Association 
dB
decibels (logarithmic ratio of power or voltage) 
DC
direct (non-varying) current or voltage 
DCCT
direct-current current transformers 
e.g. exemplia gratis 
emf electromotive force 
EMI electromagnetic interference 
ESL
effective series inductance 
ESR
effective series resistance 
FCC
Federal Communications Commission 
(MOS)FET
(metal oxide silicon) field-effect transistor 
HCR
heavily cold-reduced 
HRC
high rupture capacity
IC
integrated circuit
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission 
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
LC
(filter) a low-pass filter consisting of a series inductor and shunt capacitor 
LED
light-emitting diode 
LISN
line impedance stabilization network 
mmf magnetomotive force (magnetic potential, ampere-turns) 
MLT
mean length (of wire) per turn
MOV
metal oxide varistor
MPP
molybdenum Permalloy powder
MTBF
mean time before/between failure(s)
NTC
negative temperature coefficient
OEM
original equipment manufacturer 
“off” non-conducting (non-working) state of device (circuit) 
“on” conducting (working) state of device (circuit) 
OVP
overvoltage protection (circuit)
PARD
periodic and random deviations (see glossary) 
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
delete page from pdf online; delete blank page in pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete page from pdf reader; delete page on pdf reader
SYMBOLS
xxv
Abbreviations (cont.)
pcb
printed circuit board 
PFC
power factor correction 
PFS
power failure sense/signal 
p-p
peak-to-peak value (ripple voltage/current) 
PTFE
polytetrafluoroethylene 
PVC
polyvinyl chloride 
PWM
pulse-width modulation
RF
radio frequency
RFI radio-frequency interference
rms root mean square 
RHP   right-half-plane (zero), a zero located in the right half of the complex s-plane
s positive remote sensing (terminal, line) 
s negative remote sensing (terminal, line) 
SCR
silicon controlled rectifier 
SMPS
switchmode power supply
SOA
safe operating area
SR
saturable reactor (see glossary)
TTL
transistor-transistor logic
UL
Underwriters’ Laboratories
UPS
uninterruptible power supply 
UVP
under voltage protection (circuit)
VA
volt amps (product; apparent power)
VDE
Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker 
xxvi
LIST
List of Figures and  Tables
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure
Caption
Page
Part 1
1.2.1
Circuit location categories, IEEE Standard 587–1980
1.19
1.2.2
Rate of surge occurrences versus voltage level at unprotected locations
1.20
1.2.3
Proposed 0.5-μs, 100-kHz ring wave (open-circuit voltage)
1.21
1.2.4
Unidirectional waveshapes, ANSI/IEEE Standard 28–1974
1.21
1.2.5
Metal oxide varistor (MOV) performance characteristics
1.23
1.2.6
Transient suppressor diode performance characteristics
1.23
1.2.7
Gas-filled surge arrester (SVT) performance characteristics
1.24
1.2.8
Variation in sparkover voltage with applied dv/dt for gas-filled SVPs
1.25
1.2.9
Transient overvoltage protection circuit with noise filter, using MOV and SVP
1.26
1.2.10
Transient protection circuit with noise filter, using MOV, SVP, and transient protection diodes 1.27
1.3.1
Conducted-mode RFI limits, FCC Part 15 (Subpart j) VDE 0871 and 0875
1.32
1.3.2
Ground leakage current test circuit, CSA 22.2, Part 1
1.34
1.3.3
Example of parasitic RFI current paths in a typical off-line switchmode power supply
1.36
1.3.4
TO3 mounting, with bracket configured to double as an RFI Faraday screen
1.37
1.3.5
Preferred positions for primary-to-ground-plane RFI screens
1.38
1.3.6
Standard line impedance stabilization network (LISN), per FCC, CSA, and VDE
1.39
1.4.1
Return paths for Faraday screen currents in primary and secondary circuits
1.44
1.4.2
Insulated Faraday screen, positioned between TO3 switching transistor and heat sink
1.44
1.4.3
Fully screened transformer, showing Faraday and safety screens
1.45
1.4.4
Reducing parasitic RFI currents in heat sinks with output choke in the common return line
1.46
1.4.5
Screen on switching transformer to reduce RFI and EMI radiation
1.47
1.5.1
Typical fuse I2t ratings and pre-arcing fuse clearance times
1.50
1.6.1
Voltage selectable capacitive input filter, with high-frequency conducted-mode filtering 
1.56
1.6.2
Simplified input filter circuit with bridge rectifier and effective source resistance Rs
1.57
1.6.3
Rectifier and capacitor voltage and current waveforms in a full-wave capacitor input filter
1.58
1.6.4
RMS input current vs. loading, with source resistance factor R
sf
as a parameter
1.60
1.6.5
RMS filter capacitor current vs. loading, with source resistance factor R
sf
as a parameter
1.60
1.6.6
Ratio of peak capacitor current to effective input current I
e
vs. loading, with R
sf
as a parameter  1.60
1.6.7
Mean DC output voltage of full-wave bridge vs. load power, with R
sf
as a parameter
1.64
1.6.8
Mean DC output voltage of voltage doubler vs. load power, with R
sf
as a parameter
1.65
1.6.9
Possible range of error of calculated internal power loss and efficiency vs. real efficiency
1.71
1.7.1
Resistive inrush limiting circuit for bridge and voltage doubler operation 
1.74
1.7.2
Resistive inrush-limiting circuit with triac bypass for improved efficiency
1.75
1.8.1
Dissipative start circuit, providing initial low-voltage auxiliary power needs from the line
1.78
1.8.2
Transistor start circuit, providing initial low-voltage auxiliary supply needs from the line 
1.78
1.8.3
Diac impulse start circuit, providing initial low-voltage auxiliary needs from the line 
1.80
1.9.1
Soft-start circuit for duty-cycle-controlled SMPS
1.82
1.9.2
Combined low-dissipation transistor auxiliary start circuit, with duty ratio control and soft-start 1.84
1.10.1
Typical duty ratio control loop, showing control amplifier and compensation components
1.86
1.10.2
Output voltage characteristic of the circuit in Fig. 1.10.1 showing turn-“on” overshoot
1.87
1.10.3
Modified control circuit showing turn-“on” overshoot prevention components
1.87
1.10.4
Turn-“on” of modified circuit, showing underdamped, overdamped, and optimum responses
1.88
1.11.1
(a)-(c), SCR crowbar overvoltage protection circuits
1.90
1.11.1
(d) Typical performance of delayed crowbar circuit (e) Typical zener diode characteristic
1.91
1.11.2
Shunt regulator-type voltage clamp circuits
1.94
1.11.3
(a) OVP circuit with voltage clamp and crowbar (b) Operating characteristics of OVP circuit
1.96
1.11.4
Typical overvoltage shutdown protection circuit for SMPS
1.99
1.12.1
Characteristics of a typical undervoltage transient protection circuit
1.102
1.12.2
Position and method of connection for undervoltage protection circuit
1.103
1.12.3
Undervoltage circuit development steps
1.104
1.12.4
Example of an undervoltage protection circuit
1.105
1.13.1
Typical V/I characteristics of a constant-current-limited power supply with load lines
1.110
1.14.1
Current overload reentrant shutdown characteristic of foldback current-limited supply
1.114
LIST
xxvii
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
1.14.2
(a) Foldback current limit circuit (b) Regulator dissipation with reentrant protection
1.115
1.14.3
Overload and start-up of foldback current-limited supply, showing load lines
1.116
1.14.4
Nonlinear load line, showing “lockout” and modified characteristics to prevent lockout
1.117
1.14.5
(a) Bipolar connection with cross-coupled load (b) Composite characteristic with bipolar load 1.119
1.15.1
(a) Base drive current shaping for high-voltage transistors (b) Current and voltage waveforms 1.124
1.16.1
Single-ended forward converter with single-ended proportional base drive circuit
1.128
1.16.2
Single-ended forward converter with push-pull proportional base drive circuit
1.130
1.16.3
Push-pull proportional drive with special drive current shaping for high-voltage transistors
1.131
1.17.1
Baker clamp anti-saturation drive clamp circuit
1.134
1.18.1
(a) Conventional dissipative RC flyback snubber (b) Waveforms of RC snubber circuit
1.136
1.18.2
Safe operating area characteristics, with and without snubber circuits
1.138
1.18.3
Weaving snubber diode low-loss switching stress reduction (snubber) circuit
1.141
1.18.4
Snubber diode and Baker anti-saturation clamp combination
1.142
1.19.1
Basic half-bridge circuit
1.146
1.19.2
Typical cross-conduction current waveforms
1.146
1.19.3
Example of a cross-coupled cross-conduction inhibit circuit
1.147
1.20.1
(a) Power output filter showing CC, R
s
, ESL, and ESR (b), (c) Output filter equivalent circuits 1.150
1.20.2
Two-stage output filter
1.151
1.20.3
(a) Ferrite rod choke (b) Response of tight winding (c) Response of spaced winding 
1.153
1.20.4
Impedance and phase shift of electrolytic capacitor vs. frequency
1.154
1.20.5
Example of resonant output filter applied to a flyback converter secondary
1.155
1.20.6
Common-mode output filter
1.156
1.21.1
Simple opto-coupled power failure warning circuit
1.162
1.21.2
More precise “brownout” power failure warning circuit
1.163
1.21.3
Power failure warning circuit with “brownout” detection
1.163
1.21.4
Independent power failure module for direct operation from ac line inputs
1.165
1.21.5
A simple power failure warning circuit for flyback converters
1.166
1.21.6
(a) Brownout waveforms (b) “Optimum speed” power failure warning circuit
1.168
1.22.1
Saturating-core centering inductors applied to a multiple-output push-pull converter
1.172
1.23.1
Single-transformer, self-oscillating flyback auxiliary power supply, with energy recovery diode 1.176
1.23.2
Self-oscillating flyback auxiliary supply with energy recovery winding and synchronization
1.178
1.23.3
Self-oscillating flyback auxiliary, with cooling fan supply for dual input voltage applications
1.179
1.23.4
Block diagram of distributed ancillary power system for multiple control PCBs
1.180
1.23.5
Rectifier, regulator, and current limit sections of pre-regulator for inverter of Fig. 1.23.8
1.181
1.23.6
Output regulation of linear regulator for inverter of Fig. 1.23.8
1.182
1.23.7
Load regulation and foldback current limiting for linear regulator of Fig. 1.23.5
1.183
1.23.8
Current fed, self-oscillating, sine wave inverter
1.184
1.23.9
Current fed, self-oscillating, sine wave inverter waveforms 
1.186
1.23.10
Sine wave inverter tank circuit waveforms
1.187
1.23.11
Typical output module with semi-regulated positive and negative 12 volt outputs
1.188
1.24.1
Linear voltage-stabilized power supplies in master-slave connection
1.196
1.24.2
Parallel operation of current-mode linear power supplies showing natural current-sharing
1.197
1.24.3
Parallel operation of voltage-stabilized linear power supplies showing forced current-sharing
1.198
1.24.4
Example of a forced current-sharing circuit
1.199
1.24.5
Parallel redundant connection of stabilized voltage power supplies
1.199
1.24.6
Parallel voltage-stabilized power supplies, showing quasi-remote voltage sensing connections 1.200
Part 2 
2.1.1
Rectifier and converter sections of typical triple-output, flyback (buck-boost) power supply
2.4
2.1.2
Simplified power section of a flyback (buck-boost) converter
2.6
2.1.3
Flyback equivalent primary circuit and waveforms during energy storage phase
2.7
2.1.4
Flyback equivalent secondary circuit and waveforms during energy transfer phase
2.8
2.1.5
Flyback primary and secondary waveforms during discontinuous and continuous modes
2.9
2.1.6
Flyback magnetization loop and energy transferred with small and large air gaps
2.12
2.2.1
Flyback magnetization loops, with and without an air gap 
2.18
2.2.2
Nomogram of transmissible power vs. core volume, with converter type as parameter
2.22
xxviii
LIST
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
2.2.3
Static magnetization curves for Siemens N27 ferrite material
2.22
2.2.4
Flyback primary current waveforms
2.27
2.3.1
Flyback collector voltage clamp and collector voltage waveform
2.34
2.3.2
Dissipative snubber circuit applied to the collector of an off-line flyback converter
2.35
2.3.3
Collector waveforms, showing phase shift when dissipative snubber components are fitted
2.36
2.4.1
Flyback output parasitic components ESL and ESR, and waveforms
2.43
2.5.1
Diagonal FET half-bridge (two-transistor) single-ended flyback converter
2.48
2.5.2
Waveforms for diagonal half-bridge flyback converter, showing recovered energy
2.49
2.6.1
Typical frequency variation of Type C self-oscillating converter as a function of load
2.54
2.6.2
Nonisolated, single-transformer, self-oscillating flyback with primary current-mode control
2.55
2.6.3
Base drive current waveform of self-oscillating converter
2.56
2.6.4
Isolated-output, single-transformer, self-oscillating, current-mode-controlled flyback
2.58
2.7.1
Current and voltage waveforms of self-oscillating flyback converter
2.63
2.8.1
Forward (buck-derived) converter with energy recovery winding, showing capacitance C
c
2.68
2.8.2
Forward secondary current waveforms, showing incomplete and complete energy transfer 
2.69
2.9.1
Optimum working peak flux density for N27 ferrite material vs. output power
2.75
2.9.2
B/H loop showing extended push-pull working range and limited forward and flyback range
2.75
2.9.3
Output filter of single-ended (buck-derived) forward converter
2.77
2.9.4
Transformer and output circuit of typical multiple-output forward converter
2.78
2.9.5
Core section, schematic, and practical implementation of balanced half turns on E core 
2.79
2.9.6
Primary current of continuous-mode forward converter, with 20% magnetization current 
2.80
2.10.1
Diagonal half-bridge (dual-FET) forward converter
2.84
2.11.1
Core size selection chart for forward converters, showing throughput power vs. frequency 
2.88
2.12.1
Power section and collector waveforms of half-bridge push-pull forward converter
2.94
2.12.2
Temperature rise of FX 3730 transformer vs. total internal dissipation in free air 
2.98
2.12.3
Hysteresis and eddy-current losses in FX 3730 cores vs. flux with frequency as parameter
2.99
2.13.1
Full-bridge forward push-pull converter, showing inrush limiting circuit and input filter
2.106
2.13.2
Voltage and current waveforms for full-bridge converter
2.107
2.13.3
Push-pull core selection chart showing power vs. frequency with core size as a parameter
2.110
2.13.4
Core loss per gram of A16 ferrite vs. frequency, with peak flux density as a parameter
2.111
2.13.5
Optimum A16 ferrite core, copper, and total losses for EE55/55/21 cores 
2.112
2.13.6
N27 magnetization curves and flux density vs. frequency, with core size as parameter
2.113
2.14.1
Primary voltage-regulated self-oscillating flyback converter for low-power auxiliary supplies
2.118
2.14.2
Primary current waveform for self-oscillating auxiliary converter
2.120
2.14.3
A
L
factor as a function of core gap size for E16 size N27 ferrite cores
2.121
2.15.2
B/Hloops for ferrite cores with B
r
/B
s
ratios of (a)less than 70% and (b)greater than 85%
2.124
2.15.1
Low-voltage, saturating-core, single-transformer, push-pull self-oscillating converter 
2.124
2.15.3
Single-transformer, nonsaturating, push-pull self-oscillating converter with current limiting
2.125
2.15.4
Magnetization curves for TDK H7A and TDK H5B2 ferrite materials
2.127
2.15.5
Effective inner circumference of toroid with single-layer winding
2.129
2.15.6
Graphical method for finding optimum toroidal core size for a single-layer winding
2.132
2.16.1
Push-pull two-transformer self-oscillating converter
2.136
2.17.1
DC-to-DC transformer (mechanical synchronous vibrator type)
2.142
2.17.2
DC transformer (self-oscillating, square-wave, push-pull converter with biphase rectification) 2.143
2.18.1
Regulated DC converter consisting of primary buck switching regulator and DC transformer
2.146
2.18.2
Regulated DC transformer, using current-mode control with loop closed to secondary
2.147
2.18.3
Multiple-output compound regulator, with secondary saturable reactor postregulation 
2.149
2.19.1
Push-pull converter with duty ratio control and proportional base drive circuit
2.152
2.19.2
Collector voltage and current waveforms for duty-ratio-controlled converter
2.153
2.19.3
Flux density excursion for balanced push-pull converter action
2.153
2.19.4
Voltage and current waveforms at light loads for duty-ratio-controlled push-pull converter
2.154
2.19.5
Push-pull core selector chart, showing power vs. frequency with core size as parameter
2.158
2.19.6
Hysteresis and eddy-current losses for E42/21/20 cores vs. flux with frequency as parameter
2.160
2.20.1
Basic power circuit and current waveforms of a buck switching regulator
2.164
2.20.2
(a) Basic circuit of DC-to-DC boost regulator. (b)Current waveforms for boost regulator
2.165
2.20.3
Basic circuit of DC-to-DC inverting regulator (buck-boost)
2.165
2.20.4
(a) Basic circuit of 
C
´
uk (boost-buck) regulator (b) Storage phase (c) Transfer phase
2.170
LIST
xxix
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
2.20.5
Ripple-controlled switching buck regulator circuit and output ripple voltage 
2.175
2.21.2
Output filter, showing duty cycle secondary control switch in series with the rectifier diode 
2.178
2.21.1
Secondary output rectifier and filter circuit of a duty-cycle-controlled forward converter
2.178
2.21.3
B/H loop of an “ideal” saturable core for pulse-width modulation
2.179
2.21.4
Single-winding saturable reactor regulator with simple voltage-controlled reset transistor
2.180
2.21.5
Saturable reactor core magnetization curves, showing two reset examples S2 and S3
2.181
2.21.6
Secondary current waveforms with saturable reactor fitted
2.182
2.21.7
Two-winding saturable reactor regulator (transductor) applied to buck regulator output 
2.186
2.21.8
Saturable reactor buck regulator with current-limiting circuit R1 and Q2
2.187
2.21.9
Push-pull saturable reactor secondary regulator circuit
2.187
2.21.10
High-frequency pulse magnetization B/H loop, showing S-shaped B/H characteristic
2.189
2.22.1
Constant-voltage power supply characteristic showing current protection loci
2.193
2.22.2
Constant-current power supply characteristic showing constant-voltage compliance limits
2.194
2.22.3
Example of a constant-current linear supply (basic circuit)
2.195
2.23.1
Power circuit topology of a basic piggyback type linear variable-voltage power supply
2.198
2.23.2
Basic drive circuit for piggyback variable power supply
2.199
2.23.3
Distribution of power loss in piggyback linear power supply
2.202
2.23.4
Load lines for constant-voltage/constant-current piggyback linear power supply
2.203
2.23.5
Full control and power circuit of piggyback variable power supply
2.204
2.24.1
Output characteristic and load lines for constant-power, variable switchmode power supply
2.208
2.24.2
Basic diagonal half-bridge power section of a typical flyback variable SMPS
2.209
2.24.3
Block diagram of variable switchmode power supply
2.213
2.24.4
Converter power section and auxiliary supply for VSMPS
2.216
2.24.5
Oscillator and pulse-width modulator for VSMPS
2.218
2.24.6
Voltage and current control amplifiers for VSMPS
2.220
2.25.1
Current waveform in discontinuous mode
2.224
2.25.2
Current waveform in continuous mode
2.227
Part 3
3.1.1
Line filter for common- and differential-mode conducted noise with typical inductors
3.5
3.1.2
Nomogram for area product of ferrite chokes with thermal resistance as a parameter
3.7
3.1.3
Nomogram for wire size of ferrite chokes vs. turns and core size, with resistance as a parameter 3.8
3.1.4
Examples of typical output chokes and differential-mode input chokes
3.12
3.1.5
Comparison of B/H characteristics of ferrite and iron chokes, with and without air gaps
3.13
3.1.6
(a)Buck regulator (b) Boost regulator (c)Continuous-mode inductor current waveform 
3.16
3.1.7
Nomogram of temperature vs. area product and dissipation, with surface area as parameter
3.24
3.1.8
Effective vs. initial permeability of rod core chokes, with length/diameter as parameter
3.25
3.1.9
Methods of winding rod core chokes, and inductance calculations
3.26
3.2.1
Magnetization parameters of iron powder cores
3.31
3.2.2
Area product nomogram for iron powder cores with thermal resistance as a parameter
3.32
3.2.3
Core loss vs. ac flux density swing for iron powder #26 mix, with frequency as a parameter
3.39
3.3.1
Turns nomogram for iron powder toroids, with inductance and core size as parameters
3.43
3.3.2
Wire size vs. turns nomogram for iron powder toroids, with size and windings as parameters
3.46
3.3.3
Temperature vs. ampere turns nomogram for iron powder toroids, with size as parameter
3.48
3.3.4
Temperature vs. current nomogram for iron powder toroids, with wire size as parameter
3.49
3.3.5
Temperature vs. dissipation nomogram for toroidal cores, with surface area as parameter
3.51
3.4.1
Nomogram giving power vs. volume, with ferrite size and frequency as parameters
3.65
3.4.2
EC41 losses vs. flux density with frequency as a parameter, showing minimum total loss 
3.66
3.4.3
Nomogram for ferrite, giving area product and optimum flux density vs. power and frequency 3.67
3.4.4
Core loss for N27 ferrite material vs. flux density swing and frequency
3.71
3.4.5
Optimum AWG and diameter vs. effective layers in the winding, with frequency as a parameter 3.76
3.4.6
Optimum copper strip thickness vs. effective full-width layers, with frequency as a parameter 3.77
3.4.7
F
r
ratio vs. optimum thickness for F
r
of 1.5, for wire or strip less than optimum thickness
3.78
3.4.8
Magnetization in simple and sandwiched transformers, and sandwiched construction
3.79
3.4.9
Insulation and winding methods in agency approved types of transformer makeup
3.81
3.4.10
Common switchmode power converter waveforms, showing effective RMS and DC values
3.83
3.4.11
Copper ratio of resistance at temperature T to that at 20°C vs. temperature 
3.84
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested