c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from pdf reader Library software component .net winforms web page mvc Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi20-part487

1.168
PART 1
FIG. 1.21.6 (a) “Brownout” ac line voltage waveforms, showing “optimum speed” circuit action. 
(b) “Optimum speed” power failure warning circuit for direct operation from ac line inputs.
Delete pages from pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf preview; delete pdf pages
Delete pages from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages in pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
21. POWER FAILURE WARNING CIRCUITS
1.169
across C2 will exceed 2.5 V, and PZ2 will be turned on. Q1 then indicates a power failure. 
An optocoupler is incorporated to isolate the sensing circuit from the output signal.
In this circuit the operating voltage is well defined. It may be adjusted so that a failure 
will be indicated only for line voltage variations that fall below the critical value required 
to provide the power supply holdup time.
The circuit is very fast and will give a brownout power failure warning within 1 to 8 ms, 
depending on where in a cycle a failure occurs.
21.8 PROBLEMS 
1. Explain the purpose of a power failure warning circuit. 
2. How is a power failure warning signal developed in a flyback switchmode supply? 
3. What is meant by brownout power failure warning? 
4. Describe the principle employed in a fast power failure warning circuit. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages pdf document; delete pages of pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
This page intentionally left blank 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf file online; delete pdf pages in preview
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; acrobat extract pages from pdf
1.171
CENTERING 
(ADJUSTMENT TO CENTER) 
OF AUXILIARY OUTPUT 
VOLTAGES ON 
MULTIPLE-OUTPUT 
CONVERTERS
22.1 INTRODUCTION
When more than one winding is used on a converter transformer to provide auxil-
iary outputs, a problem can sometimes arise in obtaining the correct output voltages. 
Because the transformer turns can only be adjusted in increments of one turn (or in 
some cases a half turn; see Part 3, Chap. 4) it may not be possible to get exact voltages 
on all outputs.
When output auxiliary regulators (often three-terminal series regulators) are to be used, 
the secondary output voltage error is generally not a problem. However, in many cases 
additional regulation is not provided, and it is desirable to “center” the output voltage 
(set it to an absolute value).
The following method describes a way of achieving this voltage adjustment in a loss-
free manner, using small saturable reactors.
22.2 EXAMPLE
Consider the triple-output forward-converter secondary circuit shown in Fig. 1.22.1. Assume 
that the 5-V output is a closed-loop regulated output, fully stabilized and adjusted.
There are two auxiliary 12-V outputs, positive and negative, which are now semiregu-
lated as a result of the closed-loop control on the 5-V line. Assume that the regulation 
performance required from the 12-V outputs is such that additional series regulators would 
not normally be required (say, ±6%).
Further assume that to obtain 12 V out, the transformer in this example requires 11.5 
turns and the half turn is not possible for flux balancing reasons. If 12 turns are used on 
the transformer, the output voltage on the 12-V lines will be high by approximately 0.7 V. 
CHAPTER 22 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
1.172
PART 1
(Remember, this output is obtained with a predefined pulse width which was set by the 
main control loop for the 5-V output.) Assume also that under these conditions, the pulse 
width is 15 Ms on and 18 Ms off, giving a total period of 33 Ms.
It is not possible to reduce the overall pulse width to obtain the correct output on the 
12-V lines, as this will also reduce the 5-V output. If, on the other hand, the pulse width to 
the 12-V outputs could be reduced without changing the pulse width to the 5-V line, then 
it would be possible to produce the required output voltage on all lines. It is possible to 
achieve this with a saturable reactor.
22.3 SATURABLE REACTOR VOLTAGE 
ADJUSTMENT
Consider the effect of placing a saturable reactor toroid (as described in Part 2, Chap. 21) 
on the output lines from the transformer to the 12-V rectifiers D1 and D2.
These reactors L1 and L2 are selected and designed so that they take a time-delay period 
t
d
to saturate, specified by 
t
t
V t
V
d

on
out on
out
required
actual
Ms
In this case, 
t
d

r

15
12 15
12 7
0827
.
.
Ms
The extra time delay t
d
is introduced on the leading edge of the output power pulse by the 
saturable reactor, and the 12.7-V output would be adjusted back to 12 V. This action is more 
fully explained in Part 2, Chap. 21.
It remains only to design the reactors to obtain the above conditions. 
FIG.  1.22.1  Saturating-core  “centering  inductors”  applied  to  a 
Multiple-output push-pull converter.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pdf pages reader
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages from a pdf; pdf delete page
22. CENTERING OF AUXILIARY OUTPUT VOLTAGES
1.173
22.4 REACTOR DESIGN
Step 1, Selection of Material 
From Fig. 1.22.1, it is clear that the cores will be set to saturation during the forward con-
duction of the output diodes D1 and D2, and to provide the same delay on the leading edge 
for the next “on” period, the cores must reset during the “off” period. When D1 and D2 
are not conducting the “flywheel diodes” D3 and D4 are normally conducting. If a square 
loop material with a low remanence is chosen, the cores will often self-reset, the recovered 
charge of D1 and D2 being sufficient to provide the reset action. However, reset resistors 
R1 and R2 may be required in some applications.
A number of small square-loop ferrite toroids meet these requirements, and the TDK 
H5B2 material in a toroidal form is chosen for this example.
Step 2, Obtaining the Correct Delay Time
Prior to saturation, the wound toroid will conduct only magnetization current and, there-
fore, will be considered in its “off” state.
The time taken for the core to saturate when the “on” period starts (diodes forward-
biased) will depend on the applied voltage, the number of turns, the required flux density 
excursion, and the area of the core, as defined by the following equation:
t
N
BA
V
d
P
e
s

$
where t
d
 required time delay, Ms
N
p
 turns 
        $B  change in flux density from B
r
to B
sat
, T
B
r
 flux remanence at H  0
B
s
 flux density at saturation, T
A
e
 effective area of core, mm2
V
s
 secondary voltage, V
In this example, the secondary voltage V
s
applied to the core at the start of the “on” period 
may be calculated from the duty ratio and the output voltage as follows:
V
V
t
t
t
s

out on
off
on
(
)
where V
out
 required output voltage, V
t
on
 “on” period, Ms
t
off
 “off” period, Ms
In this example,
V
s


12 7 15 18
15
27 9
. (
)
. V
There are now two variables available for final voltage adjustments: turns and core area. 
Assume, for convenience, that a single turn is to be used; that is, the output wire from the 
1.174
PART 1
transformer is simply passed through the toroid. There is now only one variable, the core 
area, and the required core cross-sectional area may be calculated as follows:
A
Vt
N B
e
s d

$
In this example,
A
e

r
r

27 9 0 827
1 0 4
57 7
2
.
.
.
. mm
This is a relatively large core, and for economy in low-current applications more turns may 
be used. For example, 5 turns and a core of 
1
b
5
of the previous area will give the same delay. 
The area would now be A
e
 11.4 mm2, and a TDK T7–14–3.5 or similar toroid would be 
suitable.
It may be necessary to fit resistors (R1, R2) across the rectifier diodes D1 and D2 to 
allow full restoration of the cores during the “off” period, as the leakage current and recov-
ered charge from D1 and D2 may not be sufficient to guarantee full recovery of the cores 
during the nonconducting (reverse-voltage) period.
Note: This method of voltage adjustment will hold only for loads exceeding the magnetiz-
ing current of the saturable reactor; hence the voltage tends to rise at light loads. Where 
control is required to a very low current, it is better to use a small, high-permeability core 
with more turns, because the inductance increases as N2 while the delay is proportional to 
N (giving lower magnetization current and control at lower currents).
A further advantage of the saturable reactor used in this way is that it reduces the recti-
fier diode reverse recovery current, an important advantage in high-frequency forward and 
continuous-mode flyback converters.
22.5 PROBLEMS 
1. What is meant by the term “centering” as applied to multiple-output converters? 
2. Why is centering sometimes required in multiple-output applications? 
3. Describe a method of nondissipative voltage centering commonly used in duty ratio-
controlled converters. 
4. Explain how saturable reactors L1 and L2 in Fig. 1.22.1 reduce the output voltages of 
the 12-V outputs. 
5. Assume that the single-ended forward converter shown in Fig. 1.22.1 gives the required 
5-V output when the duty ratio is 40% at a frequency of 25 kHz. The 5V secondary has 
3 turns, the 12-V secondaries have 9 turns each, and the rectifier drop is 0.7 V. 
If L1 and L2 have 3 turns on a T8–16–4 H5B2 toroid core (see Fig. 2.15.4 and 
Table 2.15.1), calculate the output voltage with and without L1 and L2). Is there a 
better turns selection for 12 V? 
1.175
CHAPTER 23
AUXILIARY SUPPLY SYSTEMS
23.1 INTRODUCTION
Very often, an auxiliary power supply will be required to provide power for control and 
drive circuits within the main switchmode unit.
Depending on the chosen design approach, the auxiliary supply will be common to 
either input or output lines, or in some cases will be completely isolated. A number of ways 
of meeting these auxiliary requirements are outlined in the following sections.
The method chosen to provide the auxiliary needs should be considered very carefully, 
as this choice will often define the overall design strategy. For example, in "off-line" sup-
plies, if the internal auxiliary supply to the control and drive circuits is common to the input 
line, then some method is required to isolate the control signal developed at the output 
from the high-voltage input. Often optical couplers or transformers will be used for this 
purpose.
Alternatively, if the internal auxiliary supply is common to the output circuit, then drive 
transformers to the power transistors may be required to provide the isolation. For this 
application, they must meet the creepage distance and isolation requirements for the vari-
ous safety specifications. This makes the design of the drive transformers more difficult.
When the specification requires power good and power failure signals or remote control 
functions, it may be necessary to have auxiliary power even when the main converter is not 
operating. For these applications, impulse start techniques and auxiliary supply methods 
that require the main power converter to be operating would not be suitable. Hence, all the 
ancillary requirements must be considered before choosing the auxiliary supply method.
23.2 60-HZ LINE TRANSFORMERS
Very often small 60-Hz transformers will be used to develop the required auxiliary power. 
Although this may be convenient, as it allows the auxiliary circuits to be energized before 
the main converter, the 60-Hz transformer tends to be rather large, as it must be designed to 
meet the insulation and creepage requirements of the various safety specifications. Hence, 
the size, cost, and weight of a 60-Hz auxiliary supply transformer tend to make it less attrac-
tive for smaller switchmode applications.
In larger power systems, where the auxiliary transformer size would not have a very 
dramatic effect on the overall size and cost of the supply, the 60-Hz transformer can be an 
expedient choice.
An advantage of the transformer approach is that fully isolated auxiliaries can easily be 
provided. Hence, the control circuitry may be connected to input or output lines, and the 
1.176
PART 1
need for further isolation may be eliminated. Further, the auxiliary supplies are available 
even when the main switching converter is not operating.
23.3 AUXILIARY CONVERTERS
A very small, lightweight auxiliary power supply can be made using a self-oscillating 
high-frequency flyback converter. The output windings on the converter can be completely 
isolated and provide both input and output auxiliary needs, in the same way as the previous 
60-Hz transformers.
Because auxiliary power requirements are usually very small (5 W or less), extremely 
small and simple converters can be used. A typical example of a nonregulated auxiliary 
converter is shown in Fig. 1.23.1. In this circuit, a self-oscillating flyback converter oper-
ates from the 150-V center tap of the voltage doubler in the high-voltage DC supply to the 
main converter.
FIG. 1.23.1 Auxiliary power supply converter of the single-transformer, self-oscillating flyback type, with 
energy recovery catch diode D3.
23.4 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
Initially, Q1 starts to turn on as a result of the base drive current in resistors R1 and R2. As 
soon as Q1 starts to turn on, regenerative feedback via winding P2 will assist the turn-on 
action of the transistor, which will now latch to an "on" state.
With Q1 on, current will build up linearly in the primary winding P1 at a rate defined 
by the primary inductance and applied voltage (dI/dtsV
cc
/L
p
). As the current builds up in 
the collector and emitter of Q1, the voltage across R3 will increase. The voltage on the base 
23. AUXILIARY SUPPLY SYSTEMS
1.177
of Q1 will track the emitter voltage (plus V
be
), and when the base voltage approaches the 
voltage developed across the feedback winding P2 (about 5 volts), the current in R2 will 
fall toward zero, and Q1 will start to turn off.
Regenerative feedback from P2 will now reverse the base drive voltage, turning Q1 off 
more rapidly. By flyback action, the collector of Q1 will fly positive until the clamp diode 
D3 is brought into conduction. Flyback action will continue until most of the energy stored 
in the transformer core is returned to the 300-V supply line.
However, at the same time, a small amount of energy will be transferred to the outputs 
via D5 and D6. Because D3 conducts throughout the flyback period, and the same primary 
winding is used for both forward and flyback actions, the flyback voltage will be equal to 
the forward voltage, and the output voltage will be defined by the supply voltage. Also, the 
flyback period will be the same as the forward period, giving a 50% mark space ratio, that 
is, a square-wave output.
The inductance of the transformer primary should be chosen by gapping the core such 
that the stored energy at the end of an "on" period 
1
2
2
LP
p
is at least three or four times 
greater than that required for the auxiliary outputs, so that clamping diode D3 will always 
be brought into conduction during the flyback period. This way, the secondary flyback 
voltage will be defined by the turns ratio and the primary voltage. This can be an advantage 
when the auxiliary voltage is to be used for power failure/power good indications and to 
provide low-input-voltage inhibit actions.
As the primary turns are very large (300 to 500 turns typically), there is a considerable 
distributed interwinding capacitance in the primary. The relatively small primary induc-
tance, given by the large air gap in the transformer core, improves the switching action in 
these small converters.
Although the current in the primary may appear quite large for the transmitted power, 
the overall efficiency remains high, as the majority of the energy is returned to the supply 
line during the flyback period. The mean off-load current of these converters is often only 
2 or 3 mA, although the peak primary current may be as high as 50 mA.
Because a DC current is taken from the center tap of the input capacitors C1 and C2, 
this simple converter is suitable only for voltage doubler applications. If full-wave input 
rectification is used, a DC restoration resistor is required across C1.
23.5 STABILIZED AUXILIARY CONVERTERS
Many variations of this basic self-oscillating converter are possible. By using a high-
voltage zener on the input side, it is possible to provide stabilized auxiliary outputs and 
also maintain a constant operating frequency.
Figure 1.23.2 shows one such modification to the basic circuit. This circuit is also more 
suitable for dual-voltage operation, as the flyback energy is returned to the same input line 
as the primary load.
The input voltage is stabilized by ZD1 and gives constant-frequency operation. This 
auxiliary converter may be used as the basic clock for the control circuit, providing drive 
directly to the power switching transistors. Very simple and effective switchmode supplies 
may be designed using this principle.
An energy recovery winding P3 and diode D6 have been added to the transformer so 
that the spare flyback energy is returned to the same supply capacitor as the primary wind-
ing P1 (C3). This makes the mean loading current on ZD1 very low, allowing simple and 
efficient zener diode preregulation. Both forward and flyback voltages are regulated by 
ZD1, providing a regulated flyback voltage and hence regulated outputs. It is important to 
use bifilar windings for P1 and P3 and to fit the energy recovery diode D6 in the top end of 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested