c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader application Library tool html .net azure online Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi22-part489

1.188
PART 1
23.12.5 Overlapping Conduction
In any current fed system using an input choke, it is essential that a current path is always 
provided through L1 via Q1 or Q2. It is essential that there is no part of a cycle when both 
turn "off" at the same time. If this happens, L1 will force excessive voltage to appear across 
the transistors, leading to breakdown. To prevent this happing under any conditions of load 
and line, a short conduction overlap is introduced.
In this design, the transistor storage time provides a short overlap period when Q1 
and Q2 are both "on" at the same time. This shows up as a step on the waveform of 
Fig 1.23.10(A). This overlap is achieved by overdriving the base emitter junctions. Notice 
that although there is an "off" bias voltage available across S1, emitter-base reverse current 
flow is blocked by D1 or D2 so that the transistors turn "off" by internal recombination 
(a relatively slow process). Hence by adjusting R2, the overdrive can be adjusted to get the 
required overlap period.
23.13 OUTPUT MODULES
Figure 1.23.11 shows a typical output module. Clearly the actual design of the modules and 
the output voltages will depend on the application.
FIG. 1.23.11 shows a typical output module. In this example semi-regulated 
positive and negative 12 volt outputs are provided, and a fully regulated  5volt 
output. Many other arrangements are possible, depending on the application. 
Full  wave  rectification  is  recommended  to  balance  the loading on  the sine 
wave inverter.
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page in a pdf file; delete page from pdf file
23. AUXILIARY SUPPLY SYSTEMS
1.189
23.13.1 Module Transformers Designs
Normally the module transformers can be quite small, because the 50-kHz 20-V RMS
primary input requires a relatively small number of primary turns. For example, we will 
see that a small EE19 core with a center pole area of 20 mm2 requires only 30 turns on the 
primary as shown below.
Because the waveform is a sine wave, the primary turns may be calculated directly using 
a dimensionally modified version of Faraday’s Law as follows:
N
V
f A
e

10
6
RMS
4.44 B
Where N  Primary turns
V
RMS
 Winding voltage (Volts RMS)
f Frequency (Hz)
B Flux density (Tesla, typ. 150 mT)
A
e
 Effective core area (mm2)
23.13.2 Design Example Using an EE19 Ferrite Core
The EE19 core has a center pole area A
e
 20 mm2. We can calculate the turns required at 
20 volts RMS and 50 kHz as follows.
Minimum primary turns
20
4.44
50 10
3
N
r
r
r
r
10
6
1150 10
20
turns
3
r
r

30
When calculating secondary turns, remember the rectifiers will respond to the peak value 
of the sine wave where
V
V
peak
RMS
 2
Also, be sure to allow for diode forward voltage drops.
Tip: If the correct ratio cannot be found with 30 turns on the primary, then increase the 
primary turns to obtain the nearest integer secondary turns as required.
23.13.3 Construction
Use a two section bobbin, and wind the primary in one section and the secondaries in the 
other. This has the advantage of reducing capacitive coupling and provides good primary 
to secondary isolation. The leakage inductance primary to secondary will be quite high, but 
this is a rare example where leakage inductance is helpful. It reduces the peak current into 
the output rectifiers and increases the conduction angle, but has little effect on the output 
voltage and regulation. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete pages from pdf online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page from pdf online; delete blank page in pdf
1.190
PART 1
23.14 SINE WAVE INVERTER 
TRANSFORMER DESIGN
23.14.1 Operating Quality Factor Q
We start the design by defining the quality factor Q. This is an important parameter as 
it sets the magnitude of the primary current and allows the core size and wire sizes to 
be defined.
Q defines the ratio of reactive current, which does not contribute to output power, to real 
(resistive) current. Another way of looking at "Q" is that it is proportional to the ratio of 
energy circulating in the tank circuit, to the energy taken away by the load each cycle.
High Q circuits have nice clean sine waves, which are maintained by the larger cur-
rents circling in the tank circuit, as the tank circuit is loaded (rather like the flywheel in a 
mechanical system). This clean sine wave is obtained at the cost of high circulating current 
in the tank circuit, leading to high loss in the resistance of the primary windings P1 and 
P2. Conversely, low Q circuits have more distortion of the sine wave, but less loss. In this 
type of self-resonating inverter circuit, a compromise value will be found with a Q between 
2 and 5.
Since the ac voltage across the capacitor C2 tends to remain constant, the value of C2 
and the frequency tend to set the reactive current and hence Q. (The larger C2, the higher 
the Q). This is explained more fully in the supplementary section Part 4, Chap. 2.
In this example C2 is 1000 pF, the frequency is 50 kHz, and the RMS voltage of the tank 
circuit is 477 volts. We can calculate the reactive current as follows:
X
f
C


r
r
r
r

1
2
2
318
P
P
C
1
2
50 10
1000 10
k
3
12
.
7
At 477 volts RMS the current will be
I
V
X
C
RMS
RMS
/
/
mA.



477 3180 150
The effective input current reflected to the primary is
I
load
power/tank voltage
/
mA.



20 477 42
The working Q will be
Q
/
/
load



I I
C
150 42 3 .6
T1 provides two functions. First, it is a transformer, stepping down the 477-V RMS primary 
voltage to the required secondary voltage of 20 volts RMS. The primary windings P1 and 
P2 and the effective core permeability form the resonating inductor, and C2 the resonating 
capacitor in the parallel tank circuit. These are chosen to set the natural resonant frequency 
to 50 kHz.
The preferred design approach is to select C2 for the required Q (see above). The core 
gap is then adjusted, to get the effective permeability of the core for the correct inductance, 
so that P1 in series with P2 will resonate at 50 kHz with the selected capacitance C2.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
cut pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf document; delete pages in pdf online
23. AUXILIARY SUPPLY SYSTEMS
1.191
Tip: In general with ferrite cores, providing the core size is not too small, it will be found that 
when the minimum primary turns (as defined by the frequency and primary voltage) have 
been calculated and wound, the inductance of the primary will be too high. Hence, a core 
gap will normally be required to reduce the effective core permeability and inductance. This 
is convenient, because it allows the inductance to be adjusted for optimum performance by 
simply adjusting the core gap. (If the inductance is too low, increase the primary turns).
23.14.2 Primary Voltage
It is shown in Part 4, Chap. 2 that the voltage across the tank circuit (the primary voltage 
across P1 and P2) is well defined and for our purpose here, we can assume that the peak 
voltage will be near P Vin.
In this example:
P(215 VDC)  675 volts peak. (Fig. 1.23.9 (B)).
The RMS value will be
V
V
peak
peak
/ 2
(or
.
).
0707
In this example:
(675)0.707  477 volts RMS.
Note: The "on" state overlap on Q1 and Q2 will increase this voltage by about 10%.
23.14.3 Core Size
The working "Q" (quality factor of the tuned circuit, Section 23.14.2) defines the ratio of 
reactive current to real (primary) load current.  To find the primary current, we can use the 
reactive current I
C
flowing in the resonant capacitor C2, and the real current I
L
reflected 
into the primary from the load. 
I
I
I
C
L
pri
mA
mA
mA RMS



(
)
(
)
2
2
2
2
150
42
156
A Q of 3.6 was used to provide a good sine wave and optimum waveforms. However, the 
primary current in P1 and P2 will be almost four times larger than it would be in a non-
resonant system, (the reactive component does not contribute to the output power but does 
cause heating in the primary winding). Hence for our 20-watt sine wave system, we would 
choose a larger core, In this example we use a core recommended for a 60 watt system. 
Hence in this example an ETD 35 was chosen.
23.14.4 Calculating Primary Turns
The ETD 35 has a core area of 92 mm2.
As shown above in a sine wave system, the primary turns may be calculated as follows:
N
V
f A
e
min
RMS
4.44

10
6
B
Where N
min
 Minimum primary turns
V
RMS
 Winding voltage (Volts RMS)
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages from a pdf in preview; cut pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete a page from a pdf reader; acrobat remove pages from pdf
1.192
PART 1
f Frequency (Hz)
B Flux density (Tesla, typ. 150 mT)
A
e
 Effective core area (mm2)
In this example
N
Pmin
4.44
t

r
r
r
r
r
r

10
477
50 10
150 10
92
156
6
3
3
uurns P
P
(
)
1
 2
It was found convenient to wind 6 layers of 28 AWG at 35 turns per layer (with a center tap 
at three layers), giving a total of 210 turns with a tap at 105 turns.
(This is acceptable, because the increased turns reduce the flux density to 111 mT, 
reducing core loss).
23.14.5 Turns Ratio (Primary to Secondary)
The primary voltage is 477 volts RMS and the secondary is required to be 20 volts RMS
so the ratio is:
477
20
23 9 1
2

. :
so the secondary will require
110
23 9
9
.
 turns
23.14.6 Core Gap
With the frequency (  f
0
 50 kHz) and resonant capacitor (C2  1000 pF) defined, the 
required resonating inductance (L
p
) may be calculated.
f
L
P
0
C2

1
2
P
(
)
With the primary turns defined and the core size and permeability known, the core gap may 
be calculated. (See Part 3, Chap. 1.10.5)
However, I find it much faster to simply adjust the gap to get the required frequency in 
the working prototype as follows:
Start with a small core gap (say 0.010 inches) and hold the cores in place with an elastic 
band. Then apply sufficient input voltage for oscillation and check the frequency. Adjust 
the gap for the required frequency, and note the gap size.
Note:A "butt gap" is preferred. (That is, a gap the goes right across all three legs of the EE 
core). In this example a butt gap of 0.018 inches was required for 50 kHz operation. A butt 
gap reduces the local heating caused in the windings due to gap flux fringing. Cores that 
are gapped in the center pole only will have considerable local fringing that will cause eddy 
current heating in nearby windings. (See construction details in Part 4).
23.14.7 Calculating the Turns for the Drive Winding S1
Good regenerative starting will be found with peak drive voltages between 6 and 10 volts.
The primary volts/turn  477/210  2.3 volts per turn, so 3 turns will give 6.8 volts RMS,
(9.6 volts peak) and this was used in the prototype shown here.
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf reader; delete pages pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
add remove pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
23. AUXILIARY SUPPLY SYSTEMS
1.193
23.15 REDUCING COMMON MODE NOISE
With the choke located in the L1 position, in series with the center tap of the 50-kHz 
transformer,  the 100-kHz 337-V  haversine  peak voltage (Fig. 1.23.9 trace  (B)) will 
capacitively couple  to  the 20-volt  sine wave output  winding, introducing common 
mode noise.
Moving L1 to the alternative position LA in the common return of the DC supply (this 
does not change the function of the circuit) has the advantage that the center tap now has a 
DC voltage on it, and the common mode injection point is removed.
Although the function is unchanged, the waveforms will look quite different.
This page intentionally left blank 
1.195
PARALLEL OPERATION 
OF VOLTAGE-STABILIZED 
POWER SUPPLIES 
24.1 INTRODUCTION
Stabilized-voltage power supplies, both switching and linear, have extremely low output 
resistances, often less than 1 m7. Consequently, when such supplies are connected in 
parallel, the supply with the highest output voltage will supply the majority of the output 
current. This will continue until this supply goes into current limit, at which point its 
voltage will fall, allowing the next highest voltage supply to start delivering current, 
and so on.
Because the output resistance is so low, only a very small difference in output voltage 
(a few millivolts) is required to give large current differences. Hence, it is impossible to 
ensure current sharing in parallel operation by output voltage adjustment alone. Generally 
any current imbalance is undesirable, as it means that one unit may be overloaded (operat-
ing all the time in a current-limited mode), while a second parallel unit may be delivering 
only part of its full rating.
Several methods are used to make parallel units share the load current almost equally.
24.2 MASTER-SLAVE OPERATION
In this method of parallel operation, a designated master is selected, and this is arranged 
to provide the voltage control and drive to the power sections of the remainder of the 
parallel units.
Figure 1.24.1 shows the general arrangement of the  master-slave  connection. Two 
power supplies are connected in parallel. (They could be switching or linear supplies.) 
Both supplies deliver current to a common load. An interconnection is made between the 
two units via a link (this is normally referred to as a P-terminal link). This terminal links 
the power stages of the two supplies together.
The master unit defines the output voltage, which may be adjusted by VR2. The slave 
unit will be set to a much lower voltage. (Alternatively, the reference will be linked out, 
LK1.) The output of amplifier A1` will be low, and diode D1` is reversed-biased. Q3` will 
not be conducting, and the drive to Q2` will be provided by Q3 in PSU1 via the P-terminal 
CHAPTER 24 
1.196
PART 1
link. The drive transistor Q3 must have sufficient spare drive current to provide the needs 
of all the parallel units; hence there is a limit to the number of units that can be connected 
in parallel. Drive accommodation is normally provided for a minimum of five parallel 
supplies. 
In  this  arrangement,  the slave  supplies  are  operating  as voltage-controlled current 
sources. Current sharing is provided by the voltage drop across the emitter sharing resis-
tors R
s
and R
s
`. The current-sharing accuracy is not good because of the rather variable 
base-emitter voltages of the power transistors. A sharing accuracy of 20% would be typical 
for this type of connection.
The major disadvantage of master-slave operation is that if the master unit fails, then 
all outputs will fail. Further, if a power section fails, the direct connection between the two 
units via the P terminal tends to cause a failure in all units.
24.3 VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED CURRENT 
SOURCES 
This method of parallel operation relies on a principle similar to that of the master-slave, 
except that the current-sharing P-terminal connection is made at a much earlier signal 
level in the control circuit. The control circuit is configured as a voltage-controlled current 
source. The voltage applied to the P terminal will define the current from each unit, the 
total current being the sum of all the parallel units. The voltage on the P terminal, and hence 
the total current, is adjusted to give the required output voltage from the complete system. 
Figure 1.24.2 shows the general principle.
In this arrangement the main drive to the power transistors Q1 and Q1` is from the 
voltage-controlled current amplifiers A1 and A1`. This operates as follows.
Assume that a reference voltage REF has been set up by one of the amplifiers. (REF2 
and REF2` must be equal, as they are connected by the P terminals.) The conduction of 
FIG. 1.24.1 Linear voltage-stabilized power supplies in master-slave connection.
24. PARALLEL OPERATION OF VOLTAGE-STABILIZED POWER SUPPLIES 
1.197
transistors Q1 and Q1` will be adjusted by the amplifiers so that the currents in the two 
current-sensing resistors R1 and R1` will be well defined and equal. The magnitude of the 
currents depends on the reference voltage on P and the resistor values.
The dominant control amplifier, A2 or A2` (the one set to the highest voltage), will now 
adjust the current to obtain the required output voltage. The other amplifier will have its 
output diode reverse-biased.
The major advantage of this arrangement is that a failure in the power section is 
less likely to cause a fault in the P-terminal interconnection, and the current sharing 
is well defined.
This circuit lends itself well to parallel redundant operation. See Sec. 1.24.5.
24.4 FORCED CURRENT SHARING
This method of parallel operation uses a method of automatic output voltage adjustments 
on each power supply to maintain current sharing in any number of parallel units. This 
automatic adjustment is obtained in the following way.
Because the output resistance in a constant-voltage supply is so low (a few milliohms 
or less), only a very small output voltage change is required to make large changes in the 
output current of any unit.
With forced current sharing, in principle any number of units can be connected in paral-
lel. Each unit compares the current it is delivering with the average current for all units in 
the total setup and adjusts its output voltage so as to make its own output current equal to 
the average current.
Figure 1.24.3 shows the principle used for this type of system. Amplifier A1 is the 
voltage control amplifier of the supply. It operates in the normal way, comparing the 
output voltage from the divider network R3, R4 with an internal reference voltage `V
ref
and controlling the power stage so as to maintain the output voltage constant. However, 
FIG. 1.24.2 Parallel operation of current-mode-controlled linear power supplies, show-
ing natural current-sharing ability.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested