c# pdf reader itextsharp : Cut pages from pdf software Library cloud windows .net asp.net class Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi25-part492

2.18
PART 2
FIG. 2.2.1 (a) Total magnetization loops for a ferrite transformer, with and without
an air gap. (b) First-quadrant magnetization loops for a typical ferrite core in a single-
ended flyback converter when large and no air gaps are used. Notice the increased 
transferred energy $H when a large air gap is used.
Cut pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete page pdf file reader
Cut pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.19
It should be noted that although the permeability (slope) of the B/H loop changes with the 
length of the air gap, the saturation flux density of the combined core and gap remains the 
same. Further, the magnetic field intensity H is much larger, and the residual flux density B
r
much lower, in the gapped case. These changes are very useful for flyback transformers.
Figure 2.2.1b shows only the first quadrant of the hysteresis loop, the quadrant used 
for flyback converter transformers. It also shows the effect of introducing an air gap in the 
core. Finally, this diagram demonstrates the difference between the effects of the ac and 
DC polarizing conditions.
2.2.1 AC Polarization 
From Faraday’s law of induction, 
emf 
Nd
dt
&
It is clear that the flux density in the core must change at a rate and amplitude such that 
the induced (back) emf in the winding is equal to the applied emf (losses are assumed to 
be negligible).
Hence, to support the ac voltage applied to the primary (more correctly, the applied volt-
seconds), a change in flux density $B
ac
is required. (This is shown on the vertical axis in 
Fig. 2.2.1b.) The amplitude of $B
ac
is therefore proportional to the applied voltage and the 
“on” period of the switching transistor Q1; hence B
ac
is defined by the externally applied ac 
conditions, not by the transformer air gap.
Therefore, the applied ac conditions may be considered as acting on the vertical B axis 
of the B/H loop, giving rise to a change in magnetizing current $H
ac
. Hence H may be 
considered the dependent variable. 
2.2.2 The Effect of an Air Gap on the AC Conditions 
It is clear from Fig. 2.2.1b that increasing the core gap results in a decrease in the slope of 
the B/H characteristic but does not change the required $B
ac
. Hence there is an increase in 
the magnetizing current $H
ac
. This corresponds to an effective reduction in the permeability 
of the core and a reduced primary inductance. Hence, a core gap does not change the ac flux 
density requirements or otherwise improve the ac performance of the core.
A common misconception is to assume that a core that is saturating as a result of 
insufficient primary turns, excessive applied ac voltages, or a low operating frequency 
(that is, excessive applied volt-seconds $B
ac
) can be corrected by introducing an air 
gap. From Fig. 2.2.1b, this is clearly not true; the saturated flux density B
sat
remains 
the same, with or without an air gap. However, introducing an air gap will reduce the 
residual flux density B
r
and increase the working range for $B
ac
, which may help in the 
discontinuous mode.
2.2.3 The Effect of an Air Gap on the DC Conditions
A DC current component in the windings gives rise to a DC magnetizing force H
DC
on the 
horizontal H axis of the B/H loop. (H
DC
is proportional to the mean DC ampere-turns.) 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
cut pages from pdf file; copy pages from pdf to word
2.20
PART 2
For a defined secondary current loading, the value of H
DC
is defined. Hence, for the DC 
conditions, B may be considered the dependent variable.
It should be noted that the gapped core can support a much larger value of H (DC 
current) without saturation. Clearly, the higher value of H, H
DC2
, would be sufficient to 
saturate the ungapped core in this example (even without any ac component). Hence an 
air gap is very effective in preventing core saturation that would be caused by any DC 
current component in the windings. When the flyback converter operates in the continu-
ous mode, (as shown in figure 2.1,5(b)), a considerable DC current component is pres-
ent, and an air gap must be used. 
Figure 2.2.1b shows the flux density excursion $B
ac
(which is required to support the 
applied ac voltage) applied to the mean flux density B
dc
developed by the DC component 
H
DC
for the nongapped and gapped example. For the nongapped core, a small DC polar-
ization of H
DC1
will develop the flux density B
dc
. For the gapped core, a much larger DC 
current (H
DC2
) is required to produce the same flux density B
dc
. Further, it is clear that in 
the gapped example the core will not be saturated even when the maximum DC and ac 
components are added.
In conclusion, Fig. 2.2.1b shows that the change in flux density $B
ac
required to sup-
port the applied ac conditions does not change when an air gap is introduced into the core. 
However, the mean flux density B
dc
(which is generated by the DC current component in 
the windings) will be very much less if a gap is used.
The improved tolerance to DC magnetization current becomes particularly important 
when dealing with incomplete energy transfer (continuous-mode) operation. In this mode 
the flux density in the core never falls to zero, and clearly the ungapped core would 
saturate.
Remember, the applied volt-seconds, turns, and core area define the required ac 
change in flux density $B
ac
applied to the vertical B axis, while the mean DC current, 
turns, and magnetic path length set the value of H
DC
on the horizontal axis. Sufficient 
turns and core area must be provided to support the applied ac conditions, and suf-
ficient air gap must be provided in the core to prevent saturation and support the DC 
current component.
2.3 GENERAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
In the following design, the ac and DC conditions applied to the primary are dealt with 
separately. Using this approach, it will be clear that the applied ac voltage, frequency, area 
of core, and maximum flux density of the core material control the minimum primary turns, 
irrespective of core permeability, gap size, DC current, or required inductance.
It should be noted that the primary inductance will not be considered as a transformer 
design parameter in the initial stages. The reason for this is that the inductance controls 
the mode of operation of the supply; it is not a fundamental requirement of the trans-
former design. Therefore, inductance will be considered at a later stage of the design 
process. Further, when ferrite materials are used at frequencies below 60 kHz, the follow-
ing design approach will give the maximum inductance consistent with minimum trans-
former loss for the selected core size. Hence, the resulting transformer would normally 
operate in an incomplete energy transfer mode as a result of its high inductance. If the 
complete energy transfer mode is required, this may be obtained by the simple expedient 
of increasing the core gap beyond the minimum required to support the DC polarization, 
thereby reducing the inductance. This may be done without compromising the original 
transformer design.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete pages pdf files
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
pdf delete page; delete pages out of a pdf file
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.21
When ferrite cores are used below 30 kHz, the minimum obtainable copper loss will 
normally be found to exceed the core loss. Hence maximum (but not optimum*) efficiency 
will be obtained if maximum flux density is used. Making B large results in minimum 
turns and minimum copper loss. Under these conditions, the design is said to be “satura-
tion limited,” At higher frequencies, or when less efficient core materials are used, the core 
loss may become the predominant factor, in which case lower values of flux density and 
increased turns would be used and the design is said to be “core loss limited.” In the first 
case the design efficiency is limited; optimum efficiency cannot be realized, since this 
requires core and copper losses to be nearly equal. Methods of calculating these losses are 
shown in Part 3, Chap. 4.
2.4 DESIGN EXAMPLE FOR A 110-W FLYBACK 
TRANSFORMER 
Assume that a transformer is required for the 110-W flyback converter specified in Part 2, 
Sec. 1.11. 
2.4.1 Step 1, Select Core Size
The required output power is 110 W. If a typical secondary efficiency of 85% is assumed 
(output diode and transformer losses only), then the power transmitted by the transformer 
would be 130 W.
We do not have a simple fundamental equation linking transformer size and power rat-
ing. A large number of factors must be considered when making this selection. Of major 
importance will be the properties of the core material, the shape of the transformer (that 
is, its ratio of surface area to volume), the emissive properties of the surface, the permitted 
temperature rise, and the environment under which the transformer will operate.
Many manufacturers provide nomograms giving size recommendations for particular 
core designs. These recommendations are usually for convection cooling and are based 
upon typical operating frequencies and a defined temperature rise. Be sure to select a ferrite 
that is designed for transformer applications. This will have high saturation flux density, 
low residual flux density, low losses at the operating frequency, and high curie tempera-
tures. High permeability is not an important factor for flyback converters, as an air gap will 
always be used with ferrite materials.
Figure 2.2.2 shows the recommendations for Siemens N27 Siferrit material at an operating 
frequency of 20 kHz and a temperature rise of 30 K. However, most real environments will 
not be free air, and the actual temperature rise may be greater where space is restricted or less 
when forced-air cooling is used. Hence some allowance should be made for these effects. 
Manufacturers usually provide nomograms for their own core designs and materials. For a 
more general solution, use the “area-product” design approach described in Part 3, Sec. 4.5.
In this example an initial selection of core size will be made using the nomogram shown 
in Fig. 2.2.2. For a flyback converter with a throughput power of 130 W, an “E 42/20” is 
indicated. (The nomogram is drawn for 20-kHz operation; at 30 kHz the power rating of 
the core will be higher.)
The static magnetization curves for the N27 ferrite (a typical transformer material) are 
shown in Fig. 2.2.3.
*In this context, optimum means equal core and copper losses.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete a page from a pdf online; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages of pdf
2.22
PART 2
FIG. 2.2.2 Nomogram of transmissible power P as a function of core size (volume), with 
converter type as a parameter. (Courtesy of Siemens AG.)
FIG. 2.2.3  Static  magnetization  curves for Siemens  N27 ferrite material.  (Courtesy  of 
Siemens AG.)
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete blank pages in pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete pdf pages; delete pdf pages android
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.23
2.4.2 Step 2, Selecting “on” Period 
The maximum “on” period for the primary power transistor Q1 will occur at minimum 
input voltage and maximum load. For this example, it will be assumed that the maxi-
mum “on” period cannot exceed 50% of a total period of operation. (It will be shown 
later that it is possible to exceed this, using special control circuits and transformer 
designs.)
Example
Frequency 30 kHz 
Period 33 Ms
Half period 16.5 Ms
Allow a margin so that control will be well maintained at minimum input voltage; hence 
the usable period is, say, 16 Ms.
Hence
t
s
on (max)
16M
2.4.3 Step 3, Calculate Minimum DC Input Voltage to Converter Section 
Calculate the DC voltage V
cc
at the input of the converter when it is operating at full load 
and minimum line input voltage.
For the input capacitor rectifier filter, the DC voltage cannot exceed 1.4 times the rms 
input voltage, and is unlikely to be less than 1.2 times the rms input voltage. The absolute 
calculation of this voltage is difficult, as it depends on a number of factors that are not well 
defined—for example, the source impedance of the supply lines, the rectifier voltage drop, 
the characteristics and value of the reservoir capacitors, and the load current. Part 1, Chap. 
6 provides methods of establishing the DC voltage.
For this example, a fair approximation of the working value of V
cc
at full load will be 
given by using a factor of 1.3 times the rms input voltage. (This is again multiplied by 1.9 
when the voltage doubling connection is used.)
Example
At a line input of 90 V rms, the DC voltage V
cc
will be approximately 90 × 1.3 × 1.9  222 V.
2.4.4 Step 4, Select Working Flux Density Swing
From the manufacturer’s data for the E42/20 core, the effective area of the center leg is 
240 mm2. The saturation flux density is 360 mT at 100°C.
The selection of a working flux density is a compromise. It should be as high as possible 
in medium-frequency flyback units to get the best utility from the core and give minimum 
copper loss.
With typical ferrite core materials and shapes, up to operating frequencies of 30 kHz, 
the copper losses will normally exceed the core losses for flyback transformers, even when 
the maximum flux density is chosen; such designs are “saturation limited.” Hence, in this 
example maximum flux density will be chosen; however, to ensure that the core will not 
2.24
PART 2
saturate under any conditions, the lowest operating frequency with maximum pulse width 
will be used.
With the following design approach, it is likely that a condition of incomplete energy 
transfer will exist at minimum line input and maximum load. If this occurs, there will be 
some induction contribution from the effective DC component in the transformer core. 
However, the following example shows that as a large air gap is required, the contribution 
from the DC component is usually small; therefore, the working flux density is chosen at 
220 mT to provide a good working margin. (See Fig. 2.2.3.)
Hence, for this example the maximum peak-to-peak ac flux density B
ac
will be chosen 
at 220 mT.
The total ac plus DC flux density must be checked in the final design to ensure that core 
saturation will not occur at high temperatures. A second iteration at a different flux level 
may be necessary.
2.4.5 Step 5, Calculate Minimum Primary Turns
The minimum primary turns may now be calculated using the volt-seconds approach for a 
single “on” period, because the applied voltage is a square wave:
N
Vt
B A
ac e
min

$
where N
min
= minimum primary turns
V V
cc
(the applied DC voltage)
t  “on” time, Ms
$B
ac
 maximum ac flux density, T
A
e
 minimum cross-sectional area of core, mm2
Example
For minimum line voltage (90 V rms) and maximum pulse width of 16 Ms
N
Vt
B A
ac e
min
.


r
r

$
222 16
0220 181
89 turns
Hence
N
p(min)
89turns
2.4.6 Step 6, Calculate Secondary Turns 
During the flyback phase, the energy stored in the magnetic field will be transferred to the 
output capacitor and load. The time taken for this transfer is, once again, determined by the 
volt-seconds equation. If the flyback voltage referred to the primary is equal to the applied 
voltage, then the time taken to extract the energy will be equal to the time to input this 
energy, in this case 16 Ms, and this is the criterion used for this example. Hence the voltage 
seen at the collector of the switching transistor will be twice the supply voltage, neglecting 
leakage inductance overshoot effects.
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.25
Example
At this point, it is more convenient to convert to volts per turn.
Primary /turn
V/
V
V
N
N
cc
p



222
89
2.5
The required output voltage for the main controlled line is 5 V. Allowing for a voltage 
drop of 0.7 V in the rectifier diode and 0.5 V in interconnecting tracks and the transformer 
secondary, the voltage at the secondary of the transformer should be, say, 6.2 V. Hence, the 
secondary turns would be 
N
V
V N
s
s



/
turns
62
25
248
.
.
.
where V
s
 secondary voltage
N
s
 secondary turns
V/N  volts per turn 
For low-voltage, high-current secondaries, half turns are to be avoided unless special tech-
niques are used because saturation of one leg of the E core might occur, giving poor trans-
former regulation. Hence, the turns should be rounded up to the nearest integer. (See 
Part 3, Chap. 4.)
In this example the turns will be rounded up to 3 turns. Hence the volts per turn during 
the flyback period will now be less than during the forward period (if the output voltage is 
maintained constant). Since the volt-seconds/turn are less on the secondary, a longer time 
will be required to transfer the energy to the output. Hence, to maintain equality in the 
forward and reverse volt-seconds, the “on” period must now be reduced, and the control 
circuitry is able to do this. Also, because the “on” period is now less than the “off” period, 
the choice of complete or incomplete energy transfer is left open. Thus the decision on 
operating mode can be made later by adjusting primary inductance, that is, by adjusting 
the air gap.
It is interesting to note that in this example, if the secondary turns had been adjusted 
downward, the volts per turn during the flyback period would always exceed the volts per 
turn during the forward period. Hence, the energy stored in the core would always be com-
pletely transferred to the output capacitor during the flyback period, and the flyback current 
would fall to zero before the end of a period. Therefore, if the “on” time is not permitted to 
exceed 50% of the total period, the unit will operate entirely in the complete energy transfer 
mode, irrespective of the primary inductance value. Further, it should be noted that if the 
turns are rounded downward, thus forcing operation in the complete energy transfer mode, 
the primary inductance in this example will be too large, and this results in the inability 
to transfer the required power. In the complete energy transfer mode, the primary current 
must always start at zero at the beginning of the energy storage period, and with a large 
inductance and fixed frequency, the current at the end of the “on” period will not be large 
enough to store the required energy (½LI2). Hence, the system becomes self power limit-
ing, a sometimes puzzling phenomenon. The problem can be cured by increasing the core 
air gap, thus reducing the inductance. This limiting action cannot occur in the incomplete 
energy transfer mode.
Hence
N
s
3turns
2.26
PART 2
2.4.7 Step 7, Calculating Auxiliary Turns 
In this example, with three turns on the secondary, the flyback voltage will be less than the 
forward voltage, and the new flyback volts per turn V
fb
/N is 
V
N
V
fb
s



3
62
3
206
.
.
V/turn
The mark space ratio must change in the same proportion to maintain volt-seconds equality:
t
PV N
V N V N
fb
fb
on
/
/
/
s


r

33 2 06
206 2 5
14 9
.
.
.
. M
where t
on
 “on” time of Q1
P total period, Ms
V
fb
/N  new secondary flyback voltage per turn
V/N  primary forward voltage per turn
The remaining secondary turns may then be calculated to the nearest half turn.
Example
For 12-V outputs, 
N
V
V N
s
s
fb



/
turns
13
206
63
.
.
where V
s
13 V for the 12-V output (allowing 1 V for the wiring and rectifier drop)
V
fb
/N  adjusted secondary volts per turn 
Half turns may be used for these additional auxiliary outputs provided that the current 
is small and the mmf is low compared with the main output. Also, the gap in the outer 
limbs will ensure that the side supporting the additional mmf will not saturate. If only 
the center leg is gapped, half turns should be avoided unless special techniques are used. 
(See Part 3, Sec. 4.14.) 
In this example, 6 turns are used for the 12-V outputs, and the outputs will be high by 0.4 V. 
(This can be corrected if required. See Part 1, Chap. 22.)
2.4.8 Step 8, Establishing Core Gap Size
General Considerations. Figure 2.2.1a shows the full hysteresis loop for a typical ferrite 
material with and without an air gap. It should be noted that the gapped core requires a 
much larger value of magnetizing force H to cause core saturation; hence, it will withstand 
a much larger DC current component. Furthermore, the residual flux density B
r
is much 
lower, giving a larger usable working range for the core flux density, $B. However, the 
permeability is lower, resulting in a smaller inductance per turn (smaller A
L
value) and 
lower inductance.
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.27
With  existing  ferrite  core  topologies  and 
materials, it will be found that an air gap is invari-
ably required on flyback units operating above 
20 kHz. 
In  this  design,  the  choice  between  com-
plete and  incomplete energy  transfer has  yet 
to be made. This choice may now be made by 
selecting the  appropriate  primary  inductance, 
which  may  be  done by  adjusting  the air gap 
size. Figure 2.2.1b indicates that increasing the 
air gap will lower the permeability and reduce 
the inductance. A second useful feature of the 
air gap is that at H  0, flux density retention 
B
r
is much lower in the gapped case, giving a 
larger working range $B for the flux density. 
Finally, the  reduced permeability reduces  the 
flux density generated by any DC component in 
the core; consequently, it reduces the tendency 
to saturate the core when the incomplete energy 
transfer mode is entered.
The designer now chooses the mode of oper-
ation. Figure 2.2.4 shows three possible modes. 
Figure 2.2.4a is complete energy transfer. This 
may be used; however, note that peak currents 
are very high for the same transferred energy. 
This mode of operation would result in maxi-
mum losses on the switching transistors, out-
put diodes, and capacitors and maximum I2R
(copper) losses  within the transformer itself. 
Figure  2.2.4b  shows  the  result  of  having  a 
high inductance with a low current slope in the 
incomplete transfer mode. Although this would 
undoubtedly give the lowest losses, the large 
DC  magnetization  component  and  high  core 
permeability  would  result  in  core  saturation 
for most ferrite materials. Figure 2.2.4c shows 
a good working compromise, with acceptable 
peak currents and an effective DC component of one-third of the peak value. This has 
been found in practice to be a good compromise choice, giving good noise margin at 
the start of the current pulse (important for current-mode control), good utilization of 
the core with reasonable gap sizes, and reasonable overall efficiency.
2.4.9 Step 9, Core Gap Size (The Practical Way) 
The following simple, practical method may be used to establish the air gap.
Insert a nominal air gap into the core, say, 0.020 in. Run up the power supply with 
manual control of pulse width and a current probe in the transformer primary. Nominal 
input voltage and load should be used. Progressively increase the pulse width, being careful 
that the core does not saturate by watching the shape of the current characteristic, until the 
required output voltage and currents are obtained. Note the slope on the current character-
istic, and adjust the air gap to get the required slope.
FIG. 2.2.4 Primary current waveforms 
in  flyback  converters.  (a)  Complete 
energy  transfer  mode;  (b)  incom-
plete energy transfer mode (maximum 
primary  inductance);  (c)  incomplete 
energy  transfer  mode  (optimum  pri-
mary inductance).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested