c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete page in pdf file control application platform web page azure .net web browser Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi26-part493

2.28
PART 2
This gives a very quick method of obtaining a suitable gap that does not require Hanna 
curves. Even when gaps are calculated by other methods, some adjustment similar to the 
preceding will probably be required. This check is recommended as a standard procedure, 
as many supplies have failed at high temperature or under transient conditions because the 
transformer did not perform as intended.
2.4.10 Calculating the Air Gap 
Using Fig. 2.2.4, the primary inductance may be established from the slope of the current 
waveform ($i/$t) as follows: 
V
L
i
t
cc
p
c

$
$
Example
From Fig. 2.2.4, 
i
i
p
p
2
1
3
 (by choice)
Therefore
I
m
(mean current during the “on” period)  2i
p1
The input power is 130 W, and therefore the average input current for the total period I
a
may be calculated: 
I
V
a
cc



input power
222
A
130
0.586
Therefore the mean current I
m
for the “on” period will be 
I
I
m
a

r

r

total period
“on” time
0586 33
14 9
1
.
.
.33 A
The change of current $i during the “on” period is 2i
p1
 I
m
 1.3 A and the primary induc-
tance may be calculated as follows: 
L
V
t
i
p
cc


r
r

$
$
222 14 9 10
16
254
6
.
.
. mH
Once the primary inductance L
p
and number of turns N
p
are known, the gap may be obtained 
using the Hanna curves (or A
L
/DC bias curves) for the chosen core, if these are available. 
Remember, 
A
L
N
L
p
p

2
Delete page in pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page in pdf
Delete page in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
best pdf editor delete pages; delete page from pdf document
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.29
If no data is available and the air gap is large (more than 1% of magnetic path length), 
assume that all reluctance is in the air gap, and calculate a conservative gap size using the 
following formula: 
A
M

r
p e
p
N A
L
2
where A  total lenght of air gap, mm 
         M
r
 4P × 10–7
N
p
 primary turns 
A
e
 area of core, mm2
L
p
 primary inductance, mH 
Example
A
P

r
r
r

4
10
89
181
254
07
7
2
.
. mm or 0.027 in
Note: Use A/2 if the gap goes right across the core. (In some cases the area of the outer 
limbs is not equal to the area of the center post, in which case an adjustment must be made 
for this.)
2.4.11 Step 10, Check Core Flux Density and Saturation Margin 
It is now necessary to check the maximum flux density in the core, to ensure that an 
adequate margin between the maximum working value and saturation is provided. It is 
essential to prevent core saturation under any conditions, including transient load and high 
temperature. This may be checked in two ways: by measurement in the converter, or by 
calculation.
Core Saturation Margin by Measurement 
Note:It is recommended that this check be carried out no matter what design approach was 
used, as it finally proves all is as intended.
1. Set the input voltage to the minimum value at which control is still maintained—in this 
example, 85 V. 
2. Set output loads to the maximum power limited value. 
3. With a current probe in series with the primary winding P1, reduce the operating fre-
quency until the beginning of saturation is observed (indicated by an upturn of current 
at the end of the current pulse). The percentage increase in the “on” time under these 
conditions compared with the normal “on” time gives the percentage flux density 
margin in normal operation. This margin should allow for the reduction in flux level 
at high temperatures (see Fig. 2.2.3), and an extra 10% should be allowed for varia-
tions among cores, gap sizes, and transient requirements. If the margin is insufficient, 
increase the air gap. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from pdf online; delete page pdf online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
cut pages out of pdf; copy page from pdf
2.30
PART 2
Core Saturation Margin by Calculation 
1. Calculate the peak AC flux contribution B
ac
, using the volt-seconds equation, and cal-
culate or measure the values of “on” time and applied voltage, with the power supply at 
maximum load and minimum input voltage, as follows:
B
Vt
N A
p e
ac

where V  V
cc
, V 
t  “on” time, Ms
N
p
 primary turns 
A
e
 area of core, mm2
B
ac
 peak flux density change, T 
Note:B
ac
is the change in flux density required to sustain the applied voltage pulse and does 
not include any DC component. It is therefore independent of gap size.
Example
B
ac
mT

r
r

222 14 9
89 181
205
.
2. Calculate the contribution from the DC component B
DC
, using the solenoid equation and 
the effective DC component I
DC
indicated by the amplitude of the current at the begin-
ning of an “on” period. 
By assuming that the total reluctance of the core will be concentrated in the air gap, 
a conservative result showing an apparently higher DC flux density will be obtained. 
This approximation allows a simple solenoid equation to be used. 
B
H
N I
DC
p DC


r
M
M
A
0
0
3
10
where M
0
 4P × 10–7 H/m 
N
p
 primary turns 
I
DC
 effective DC current, A
           A  area gap, mm 
B
DC
 DC flux density, T 
Example
B
DC

r
r
r
r

4
10
89 0 65
07 10
103
7
3
P
.
.
mT
The sum of the ac and DC flux density gives the peak value for the core. Check the margin 
against the core material characteristics at 100°C.
Example
B
B
B
ac
DC
max
max



205 103 308 mT
imum
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete page in pdf document; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pages of pdf reader; delete pages in pdf reader
2. FLYBACK TRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.31
2.5 FLYBACK TRANSFORMER SATURATION 
AND TRANSIENT EFFECTS
Note: The core flux level has been chosen for minimum input voltage and maximum 
pulse width conditions. It can be seen that this leaves a vulnerability to core saturation 
at high input voltages. However, under high-voltage conditions, the pulse width required 
for the transmitted power will be proportionately narrower, and the transformer will not 
be saturated.
Under transient load conditions, when the power supply has been operating at light 
loads with a high input voltage, if a sudden increase in load is demanded, the control ampli-
fier will immediately widen the drive pulses to supply this extra power. A short period will 
now ensue during which both input voltage and pulse width will be maximum and the 
transformer could saturate, causing failure.
The following options should be considered to prevent this condition.
1. The transformer may be designed for the higher-voltage maximum-pulse-width condi-
tion. This will require a lower flux density and more primary turns. This has the disad-
vantage of reducing the efficiency of the transformer. 
2. The control circuit can be made to recognize the high-stress condition and maintain the 
pulse width at a safe value during the transient condition. This is also somewhat undesir-
able, since the response time to the applied current demand will be relatively slow. 
3.  A third option is to provide a pulse-by-pulse current limit on the drive transistor Q1. 
This current-limiting circuit will recognize the onset of core saturation resulting from 
the sudden increase in primary current and will prevent any further increase in pulse 
width. This approach will give the fastest response time and is the recommended tech-
nique. Current-mode control automatically provides this limiting action.
2.6 CONCLUSIONS
The preceding sections gave a fast and practical method for flyback transformer design. 
Many examples have shown that the results obtained by this simple approach are often 
close to the optimum design. The approach quickly provides a working prototype trans-
former for further development and evaluation of the supply.
In this design example, no attempt has been made to specify wire sizes, wire shapes, 
or winding topology. It is absolutely essential that these be considered, and the designer 
should refer to Part 3, Chap. 4, where these factors are discussed in more detail. It is impor-
tant to realize that just filling the available bobbin area with the largest gauge of wire that 
will fit simply will not do for these high-frequency transformers. Because of proximity and 
skin effects (see App. 4.B), the copper losses obtained in this way can quite easily exceed 
the optimum design values by a factor of 10 or more. 
2.7 PROBLEMS
1. Calculate the minimum number of primary turns required on a complete energy transfer 
(discontinuous-mode) flyback transformer if the optimum flux density swing is to be 
200 mT. (The core area is 150 mm, the primary DC voltage is 300 V, and the maximum 
“on” period is 20 Ms.)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete blank page in pdf online; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page on pdf document
2.32
PART 2
2. For the conditions in Prob. 2.7.1, calculate the secondary turns required to give an 
output voltage of 12 V if the flyback voltage is not to exceed 500 V (neglecting any 
overshoot). Assume the rectifier diode drop is 0.8 V. 
3. Calculate the maximum operating frequency if complete energy transfer (discontinuous-
mode) operation is to be maintained. 
4. Calculate the required primary inductance, and hence the air gap length, if the trans-
ferred power is to be 60 W. (Assume maximum operating frequency, complete energy 
transfer, and no transformer loss. A transformer-grade ferrite core is used, and all reluc-
tance is concentrated in the air gap.) 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
add or remove pages from pdf; delete pages in pdf online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete pages on pdf online
2.33
REDUCING TRANSISTOR 
SWITCHING STRESS
3.1 INTRODUCTION
There are two major causes of high switching stress in the flyback converter. Both are 
associated with the turn-off behavior of a bipolar transistor with an inductive load. The 
most obvious effect is the tendency for the collector voltage to over-shoot during turn-off, 
caused mainly by the transformer leakage inductance. The second, less obvious effect is 
the high secondary breakdown stress that will occur during turn-off if load line shaping 
is not used.
The voltage overshoot problem is best dealt with by ensuring that the leakage inductance 
is as small as possible, then clamping the tendency to overshoot by dissipative or energy 
recovery methods. The following section describes a dissipative clamp system. A more 
efficient energy recovery method using an extra winding is described in Part 2, Sec. 8.5. 
If the energy recovery winding method is to be used with the flyback converter, the 
clamp voltage should be at least 30% higher than the reflected secondary voltage, to ensure 
efficient transfer of energy to the secondary. (The extra flyback voltage is required to drive 
current more rapidly through the secondary leakage inductance). 
3.2 SELF-TRACKING VOLTAGE CLAMP 
When a transistor in a circuit with an inductive or transformer load is turned off, the collec-
tor will tend to fly to a high voltage as a result of the energy stored in the magnetic field of 
the inductor or leakage inductance of the transformer. 
In most flyback converters, the majority of the energy stored in the transformer will be 
transferred to the secondary during the flyback period. However, because of the leakage 
inductance, there will still be a tendency for the collector voltage to overshoot at the begin-
ning of the flyback period unless some form of voltage clamp is provided.
In Fig. 2.3.1, the cumulative effects of transformer leakage inductance, the inductance 
of output capacitor, and loop inductance of the secondary circuit have been lumped together 
as L
LT
and referred to the primary side of the transformer in series with the main primary 
inductance L
p
.
Consider the action during turn-off following an “on” period during which a current has 
been established in the primary winding of T1. When transistor Q1 turns off, all transformer 
winding voltages will reverse by flyback action. The secondary voltage V
s
will not exceed 
CHAPTER 3
2.33
2.34
PART 2
the output V
c
, except by the output rectifier D1 diode drop. The collector of Q1 is partly 
isolated from this clamp action by the leakage inductance L
LT
, and the energy stored in L
LT
will take the collector voltage more positive.
If the clamp circuit, D2, C2, were not provided, then this flyback voltage could be dam-
agingly high, as the energy stored in L
LC
would be redistributed into the leakage capacitance 
seen at the collector of Q1.
However, in Fig. 2.3.1, under steady-state conditions, the required clamping action is 
provided by components D2, C2, and R1, as follows.
C2 will have been charged so that its plus end is at a voltage slightly more positive than 
the reflected secondary flyback voltage. When Q1 turns off, the collector voltage will fly 
back to this value, at which point diode D2 will conduct and hold the voltage constant (C2 
being large compared with the captured energy). At the end of the clamping action, the 
voltage on C2 will be somewhat higher than its starting value.
During the remainder of the cycle, the voltage on C1 will return to its original value as 
a result of the discharge current flowing in R1. The spare flyback energy is thus dissipated 
inR1. This clamp voltage is self-tracking, as the voltage on C2 will automatically adjust its 
value, under steady-state conditions, until all the spare flyback energy is dissipated in R1.
If all other conditions remain constant, the clamp voltage may be reduced by reducing the 
value of R1 or the leakage inductance L
LT
.
It is undesirable to make the clamp voltage too low, as the flyback overshoot has a use-
ful function. It provides additional forcing volts to drive current into the secondary leak-
age inductance during the flyback action. This results in a more rapid increase in flyback 
current in the transformer secondary, improving the transfer efficiency and reducing the 
losses incurred in R1. This is particularly important for low-voltage, high-current outputs, 
where the leakage inductance is relatively large. Therefore, it is a mistake to choose too 
low a value for R1, and hence a low clamp voltage. The maximum permitted primary-
voltage overshoot will be controlled by the transistor V
CEX
rating and should not be less 
than 30% above the reflected secondary voltage. If necessary, use fewer secondary turns.
If the energy stored in L
LT
is large and excessive dissipation in R1 is to be avoided, this 
network may be replaced by an energy recovery winding and diode, as would be used in a 
forward converter. This will return the spare flyback energy to the supply.
FIG. 2.3.1 (a) Stress-reducing self-tracking collector voltage clamp applied to the primary of a 
flyback converter. (b) Collector voltage waveform, showing voltage clamp action.
3. REDUCING TRANSISTOR SWITCHING STRESS
2.35
It should be clear that for high efficiency and minimum stress on Q1, the leakage induc-
tance L
LT
should be made as small as possible. This will be achieved by good interleaving 
of the primary and secondary of the transformer. It is also necessary to choose minimum 
inductance in the output capacitor, and, most important, minimum loop inductance in the 
secondary circuits. The latter may be achieved by keeping wires from the transformer as 
closely coupled as possible and ideally twisted, running the tracks on the printed circuit 
board as a closely coupled parallel pair, and keeping distances small. It is attention to these 
details that will provide high efficiency, good regulation, and good cross regulation in the 
flyback-mode power supply.
3.3 FLYBACK CONVERTER “SNUBBER” 
NETWORKS
The turn-off secondary breakdown stress problem is usually dealt with by “snubber 
networks”; a typical circuit is shown in Fig. 2.3.2. The design of the snubber network is 
more fully covered in Part 1, Chap. 18.
Snubber networks will be required across the switching transistor in off-line flyback 
converters to reduce secondary breakdown stress. Also, it is often necessary to snub recti-
fier diodes to reduce the switching stress and RF radiation problems.
FIG. 2.3.2 Dissipative “snubber” circuit applied to the collector of an off-line flyback 
converter.
In Fig. 2.3.2, snubber components D
s
, C
s
, and R
s
are shown fitted across the collector 
and emitter of Q1 in a typical flyback converter. Their function is to provide an alternative 
2.36
PART 2
path for the inductively driven primary current and reduce the rate of change of voltage 
(dv/dt) on the collector of Q1 during the turn-off action of Q1.
The action is as follows: As Q1 starts to turn off, the voltage on its collector will rise. 
The primary current will now be diverted via diode D
s
into capacitor C
s
. Transistor Q1 turns 
off very quickly, and the dv/dt on the collector will be defined by the original collector cur-
rent at turn-off and the value of C
s
.
The collector voltage will now ramp up until the clamp value (2V
cc
) is reached. Shortly 
after this, because of leakage inductance, the voltage in the output secondary winding will 
have risen to V
sec
(equal to the output voltage plus a diode drop), and the flyback current 
will be commutated from the primary to the secondary via D1 to build up at a rate con-
trolled by the secondary leakage inductance.
In practice, Q1 will not turn off immediately, and if secondary breakdown is to be avoided, 
the choice of snubber components must be such that the voltage on the collector of Q1 will 
not exceed V
ceo
before the collector current has dropped to zero, as shown in Fig. 2.3.3.
FIG. 2.3.3 Collector voltage and collector current waveforms, showing phase 
shift when dissipative snubber components are fitted. Also snubber current 
waveform during Q1 turn-off.
3. REDUCING TRANSISTOR SWITCHING STRESS
2.37
Unless the turn-off time of Q1 is known, the optimum choice for these components is an 
empirical one, based upon measurements of collector turn-off voltage and current. Part 1, 
Chap. 18 and Fig. 1.18.2a, b, c, and d show typical turnoff waveforms and switching stress 
with and without snubber networks.
A safe voltage margin should be provided on the collector voltage when the current 
is zero, say at least 30% below V
ceo
, as there is a considerable influence on these param-
eters from operating temperatures, loads, the spread of transistor parameters and the drive 
design. Figure 2.3.3 shows the limiting condition; in this example, the collector current has 
just dropped to zero as the collector voltage “hits” V
ceo
.
On the other hand, too large a value of Cs should be avoided, since the energy stored 
in this capacitor at the end of the flyback period must be dissipated in Rs during the first 
part of the “on” period.
The value of Rs is a compromise selection. A very low resistance results in excessive 
current in Q1 during turn-on and will result in excessive dissipation during the “on” tran-
sient. Too large a resistance, on the other hand, will not provide sufficient discharge of Cs 
during the minimum “on” period. 
The values shown are a good compromise choice for the 100-W example. However, a 
careful examination of the voltage and current waveforms on the Q1 collector, under nar-
row pulse conditions, is recommended. The selection must always be a compromise for 
this type of snubber. The optimum selection of snubber components is more fully covered 
in Part 1, Chap. 18, and more effective snubber methods may be used that avoid a compro-
mise. (See “The Weaving Low-Loss Snubber Diode,” Part 1, Sec. 18.10.)
3.4 PROBLEMS
1. Why is the switching transistor particularly susceptible to high-voltage switching stress 
in the flyback converter?
2. Why does the flyback voltage often exceed the value that would be indicated by the turns 
ratio between the primary and secondary circuits?
3. Describe two methods used to reduce the high-voltage stress on the flyback switching
element.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested