c# pdf reader itextsharp : Add and delete pages from pdf control application platform web page azure .net web browser Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi27-part494

This page intentionally left blank 
Add and delete pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
Add and delete pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf; delete page in pdf online
2.39
SELECTING POWER 
COMPONENTS 
FOR FLYBACK CONVERTERS 
4.1 INTRODUCTION
In general, a flyback converter is much more demanding on component ratings than would 
be a forward converter of the same power. In particular, the ripple current requirements for 
output rectifiers, output capacitors, transformers, and switching transistors are much larger. 
However, the increased cost incurred for the larger components will be offset by a reduc-
tion in circuit complexity, since output inductors will not be required and there is only one 
rectifier diode for each output line.
In flyback applications, components will be selected to meet the particular voltage and 
current needs of each unit. The designer must remember, however, that even for the same 
output power rating, different modes of operation impose different stress conditions on the 
components. The recommendations for the selection of power components in the following 
section, although particularly suitable for the flyback converter shown in Part 2, Chaps. 1 
and 2, generally apply to all flyback converters.
The graphs and components shown are included for illustration only; it is not intended 
to suggest that they are necessarily the most suitable. Similar suitable components are 
available from many manufacturers.
4.2 PRIMARY COMPONENTS
4.2.1 Input Rectifiers and Capacitors 
There are no special requirements imposed on the input rectifiers and storage capacitors in 
the flyback converter. Hence these will be similar to those used in other converter types and 
will be selected to meet the power rating and hold-up requirements. (See Part 1, Chap. 6.)
4.2.2 Primary Switching Transistors
The switching transistor in a flyback supply is very highly stressed. The current rating 
depends on the maximum load, efficiency, input voltage, operating mode, and converter 
design. It will be established by calculating the peak collector current at minimum input 
CHAPTER 4 
2.39
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
processing control SDK, you can create & add new PDF rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages ipad; delete page on pdf
2.40
PART 2
voltage and maximum load. In the examples shown in Fig. 2.2.4, the peak collector current 
ranges from three to six times the mean current, depending on the operating mode.
The maximum collector voltage is also quite high. It is defined by the maximum input 
voltage (off load), the flyback factor, the transformer design, the inductive overshoot, and 
the snubbing method.
For example, when working from a nominal 110-V ac supply line, the maximum input 
is typically specified as 137 V rms. For this input voltage the maximum off-load DC header 
voltage V
cc
(using the voltage doubler input circuit) will be
V
V
cc
2 2
in
where V
cc
 V
in
V
in
 maximum ac input voltage, rms
In this example,
V
cc

r
r 
137 1 42 2 389
.
V
Typically the flyback voltage is at least twice V
cc
, or 778 in this example. Hence, allowing a 
25% margin for inductive overshoot, the peak collector voltage will be 972 V, and a transis-
tor with V
cex
rating of 1000 V would be selected.
In addition to meeting these stressful conditions, the flyback transistor must provide 
good switching performance, low saturation voltage, and have a useful gain margin at the 
peak working current. Since the selection of the transistor will also qualify the gain, it 
defines the requirements of the drive circuit. Hence, the selection of a suitable power tran-
sistor is probably the most important parameter for efficiency and long-term reliability in 
flyback converters.
Note: To avoid secondary breakdown, current tailing, and overdissipation in high-voltage 
bipolar transistors, it is essential that the correct drive and load line shaping be used.
Suitable drive circuits, waveforms, secondary breakdown, and tailing problems are dis-
cussed in Part 1, Chaps. 15, 16, 17, and 18.
4.3 SECONDARY POWER COMPONENTS
4.3.1 Rectifiers 
The output rectifier diodes in flyback converters are subject to a large peak and rms 
current stress. The actual values depend on the load, conduction angle, leakage induc-
tance, operating mode, and output capacitor ESR. Typically the rms current will be 1.6 
to 2I
DC
, while peak currents may be as high as 6I
DC
. Because the precise conditions are 
often unknown, the calculation of diode currents is difficult, and empirical methods are 
recommended.
For the initial prototype breadboarding, select diodes of adequate mean and peak 
rating. Fast diodes with a reverse recovery time not exceeding 75 ns should be used. 
The final selection of the optimum rectifier diodes should be made after measurement 
of the prototype secondary rectifier currents. Attempts to calculate the rms and peak 
diode currents are generally not very accurate, as it is difficult to predict the various 
effects of leakage inductance, output loop inductance, pcb track and wiring resistance, 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
delete pages of pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
4. SELECTING POWER COMPONENTS FOR FLYBACK CONVERTERS
2.41
and the ESR and ESL of the output capacitors. These parameters have a very significant 
effect on the rectifier rms and peak current requirements, particularly at low output 
voltages, high frequency, and high currents. These measurements can be made in the 
following way.
4.3.2 Rectifier Ripple Current Measurement Procedure 
1. Connect a current probe of adequate rating in series with the output rectifier to be mea-
sured. (See Part 3, Chaps. 13 and 14 for suitable current probe design.)
2. Using the oscilloscope, observe the current waveform and note the peak current value. 
3. Transfer the current probe to a true rms ammeter (e.g., a thermocouple instrument or 
true rms-reading instrument with a crest factor of at least 10/1) and measure the rms cur-
rent, making due allowance for the current probe and meter multiplying factors. These 
measurements should be carried out at maximum input voltage and maximum load.
Select diodes with appropriate peak and rms ratings.
4.3.3 Rectifier Losses 
The actual power loss in the output rectifier diode of a flyback supply depends on a number 
of factors, including forward dissipation, reverse leakage, and recovery losses. The forward 
dissipation depends on the effective forward resistance of the diode throughout its forward 
conduction and the shape of the current pulse, both of which are nonlinear. (In practice the 
secondary current waveform is often very different from the ideal triangular shape normally 
assumed in calculations.) Consequently, it is often more expedient to measure the tempera-
ture rise of the diode in the prototype, and from this calculate the junction temperatures and 
heat sink requirements for worst-case conditions.
From temperature rise measurements carried out on rectifiers in several flyback sup-
plies (comparing the temperature rise caused by DC stress with ac stress conditions), 
it has been found that an approximate rectifier dissipation may be calculated, using 
the measured rectifier rms current (approximately 1.6 I
DC
) and an assumed forward 
voltage drop of 800 mV for silicon diodes or 600 mV for Schottky diodes. Adequate 
heat sinks based on these calculations should be provided for initial prototypes. (See 
Part 3, Chap. 16.)
4.4 OUTPUT CAPACITORS
Output capacitors are also highly stressed in flyback converters. Normally the output capac-
itors will be selected for three major parameters: absolute capacitance value, capacitor ESR
and ESL, and capacitor ripple current ratings.
4.4.1 Absolute Capacitance Value 
When ESR and ESL are low, the capacitance value will control the peak-to-peak ripple 
voltage at the switching frequency. Because the ripple voltage is normally small compared 
with the mean output voltage, a linear decay of voltage across the output capacitors may 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; acrobat extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from a pdf online
2.42
PART 2
be assumed during the “off” period. During this period, the capacitor must deliver all the 
output current, and the voltage across the capacitor terminals will decay at approximately 
1 V/μs/A (for a 1-μF capacitor). Hence, when the maximum “off” time, the load current, 
and the required peak-to-peak ripple voltage are known, the minimum output capacitance 
may be calculated as follows:
C
t I

off DC
p p
V
where C  output capacitance, μF
t
off
 off time, μs 
I
DC
 load current, A
V
p-p
 ripple voltage p-p 
For example, for a 5-V, 10-A output line and an output ripple of 100 mV,
C
r
r

18 10
10
01
1800
6
.
MF
Note: Attempts to keep the peak-to-peak ripple voltage below 100 mV in a single-stage 
output filter will not be cost-effective. To obtain a lower output ripple, an extra LC stage 
should be fitted.
4.4.2 Capacitor ESR and ESL
Figure 2.4.1b shows the effect of the ESR and ESL (effective series resistance and induc-
tance) of the output capacitor on the output ripple. In practice, the ripple voltage will be 
much greater than would be expected from the selection of the output capacitance alone, 
and an allowance for this effect should be made when selecting capacitor size. If a single-
stage output filter is used (no extra series choke), then the ESR and ESL of the output 
capacitors will have a significant effect on the high-frequency ripple voltage, and the best 
low-ESR capacitors should be used.
The beneficial effects of an additional output LC filter should not be neglected in fly-
back systems. Such filtering reduces output noise and allows the use of much lower cost 
ordinary-grade electrolytics of adequate ripple rating as the major energy storage elements. 
(See Part 1, Chap. 20.)
4.4.3 Capacitor Ripple Current Ratings
In a flyback converter, the typical rms ripple current in the output capacitors will be 1.2 
to 1.4 times the DC output current. (See Part 1, Chap. 20.) The output capacitors must be 
capable of conducting the output ripple current without excessive temperature rise.
For a more accurate assessment of the ripple current, the following measurement 
procedure is recommended. Using a current probe of adequate rating, measure the rms 
current in the output capacitor leads under full load at maximum line input. (A true 
rms meter should be used with the current probe.) Select a capacitor to meet the ripple 
requirements, making due allowance for frequency and temperature multiplying factors. 
(See Part 3, Chap. 12.)
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
add and remove pages from a pdf; cut pages from pdf online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete pages from pdf preview; delete page on pdf file
4. SELECTING POWER COMPONENTS FOR FLYBACK CONVERTERS
2.43
4.5 CAPACITOR LIFE
Although the preceding measurements and calculations will give a good starting point for 
the selection of the optimum components, the most important parameter for long-term 
reliability is the temperature rise of the components in the working environment, and this 
should be measured in the finished product.
FIG. 2.4.1 (a) Secondary circuit of a flyback converter, showing 
parasitic series components ESL and ESR. (b) Output waveforms, 
showing effect of parasitic components.
2.44
PART 2
The temperature rise is a function of the stress in the component, heat sink design, air 
flow, and the proximity effects of surrounding components. Radiated and convected heat 
from nearby components will often cause a greater temperature rise in a component than 
internal dissipation. This is particularly true for electrolytic capacitors.
The maximum temperature rise permitted in the capacitor, as a result of ripple current 
and peak working temperature, varies with different capacitor types and manufacturers. In 
the component examples used here, the maximum rise permitted for ripple current is 8°C 
in free air, and it is this limitation that the manufacturer uses to establish the ripple current 
rating. The rating applies up to an ambient air temperature of 85°C, giving a maximum case 
temperature of 93°C.
Irrespective of the cause of the temperature rise, the absolute limit of case temperature 
(in this example, 93°C) must be used to establish the limits of operation of the unit. This 
should be measured at maximum rated temperature and load, in its normal environment. 
The life of the capacitor at its maximum temperature is not good, and lower operating 
temperatures are recommended. If in doubt as to the temperature rise caused by internal 
ripple current (this can be very difficult to calculate with complex flyback waveforms), 
proceed as follows:
1. Measure the temperature rise of the capacitor under normal operating conditions away 
from the influence of other heating effects. (If necessary, mount the capacitor on a short 
length of twisted cable, inserting a thermal barrier between the unit and the capacitor.) 
Measure the temperature rise of the capacitor resulting from the ripple component alone, 
and compare this with a manufacturer’s limiting values. The permitted temperature rise 
is not always given on the data sheets, but it can be obtained from the manufacturer’s test 
and QA departments. The temperature rise allowed is typically between 5 and 10°C.
2. If the temperature rise resulting from ripple current is acceptable, mount the capacitor 
in its normal position and subject the power supply to its highest-temperature stress and 
load conditions. Measure the surface temperature of the capacitor, and ensure that it is 
within the manufacturer’s rating. This way you can be sure to avoid thermal runaway, a 
possibility with electrolytic capacitors.
4.6 GENERAL CONCLUSIONS CONCERNING 
FLYBACK CONVERTER COMPONENTS
The power elements of a flyback system have been discussed in considerable detail. Careful 
attention to the ratings and operating conditions for every component is essential for good 
performance and reliable operation. To the power supply engineer, this will become second 
nature. The selection is a laborious process that cannot be avoided if the most cost-effective 
and reliable selections are to be made. Calculations can take the designer only part of the 
way, as much of the information critical to these selections is just not available without 
making the appropriate measurements.
The leakage inductance of the transformer, the track layout and size, the values of ESR
and ESL of the output components, component layout, and cooling arrangements have a 
considerable influence on the stress and ratings of the components. These effects cannot be 
reliably predicted. When actual measurements are not made, a wide safety margin must be 
applied to the calculated values in the selection of component ratings.
Much of the optimization and proving measurements can be more easily carried out at 
the design approval stage and will be limited to those prototypes that are destined for final 
production.
4. SELECTING POWER COMPONENTS FOR FLYBACK CONVERTERS
2.45
If long-term reliable operation and cost-effective design are to be achieved, it is incum-
bent upon the cognizant engineer to ensure that the design is optimized before the product 
is finalized and that all necessary approval testing is carried out.
4.7 PROBLEMS 
1. Explain the major parameters that control the selection of the switching transistor in a 
flyback converter.
2. What controls the selection of secondary rectifier diodes in a flyback converter?
3. Which parameters of the flyback converter control the selection of the output capacitors? 
This page intentionally left blank 
2.47
THE DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE 
FLYBACK CONVERTER 
5.1 INTRODUCTION
This converter, also known as the two-transistor converter, is particularly suitable for power 
field-effect transistor (FET) operation. Hence, FET devices are shown in the example used 
here, but the same design procedure would apply for transistor operation.
The topology also lends itself to all the previous modes of flyback operation—that is, 
fixed frequency, variable frequency, and complete or incomplete energy transfer operation. 
However, there are cost penalties incurred for the additional power device and its isolated 
drive.
5.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLE
In the circuit shown in Fig. 2.5.1, the high-voltage DC line is switched to the primary of a 
transformer by two power FET transistors, FT1 and FT2. These switches are driven by the 
control circuitry such that they will both be either “on” or “off” together. Flyback action 
takes place during the “off” state, as in the previous flyback examples.
The control, isolation, and drive circuitry will be very similar to that previously used for 
single-ended flyback converters. A small drive transformer is used to provide the simulta-
neous but isolated drives to the two FET switches.
It should be noted that the cross-connected diodes D1 and D2 return excess flyback 
energy to the supply lines and provide hard voltage clamping of FT1 and FT2 at a value of 
only one diode drop above and below the supply-line voltages. Hence switching devices 
with a 400-V rating may be confidently used, and this topology lends itself very well to 
power FETs. Moreover, the energy recovery action of diodes D1 and D2 eliminates the 
need for an energy recovery winding or excessively large snubbing components. The volt-
age and current waveforms are shown in Fig. 2.5.2.
Because the transformer leakage inductance plays an important role in the action of the 
circuit, the distributed primary and secondary leakage inductive components have been 
lumped into effective total inductances L
Lp
and L
Ls
and shown external to the “ideal” trans-
former for the purpose of this explanation.
The power section operates as follows: When FT1 and FT2 are on, the supply voltage 
will be applied across the transformer primary L
p
and leakage inductance L
Lp
. The starts of 
all windings will go positive, and the output rectifier diode D3 will be reverse-biased and 
CHAPTER 5 
2.47
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested