c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete a page from a pdf online application SDK tool html wpf azure online Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi3-part497

xxx
LIST
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
3.4.12
Avoiding E core flux imbalance when using half turns
3.88
3.4B.1
F
r
ratio vs. effective conductor thickness, with number of layers P as a parameter
3.96
3.4B.2
Showing how skin effect is caused
3.97
3.4B.3
Effective skin thickness as a function of frequency, with temperature as a parameter
3.97
3.4B.4
Showing how proximity effects are caused
3.98
3.4B.5
Plot of R
ac
vs. h/$ with number of layers as a parameter, showing optimum F
r
ratio
3.100
3.4B.6
Optimum wire diameter vs. effective layers for 1.5 F
r
ratio, with frequency as parameter
3.101
3.4B.7
Optimum strip thickness vs. effective layers for 1.4 F
r
ratio, with frequency as a parameter
3.102
3.4B.8
F
r
ratio for wires below optimum thickness
3.103
3.6.1
Basic push-pull power circuit showing current transformers for forced flux density balancing  3.113
3.6.2
A duty cycle, voltage-controlled, push-pull drive section with forced flux balancing
3.114
3.8.1
Block schematic diagram of the control loop for a forward switchmode power converter
3.120
3.8.2
A pulse loading test circuit used for transient load testing of power supplies
3.122
3.8.3
Typical output waveforms for switchmode converters under pulse loading conditions
3.123
3.8.4
Test circuit for closed-loop Bode plots of switchmode converters
3.125
3.8.5
Bode plot for a switchmode power converter, showing good phase and gain margins
3.125
3.8.6
A closed-loop Bode plot, showing an alternative injection point and using a network analyzer 3.127
3.8.7
A quasi open-loop Bode plot of the power and modulator sections using a network analyzer 
3.128
3.8.8
A diagram of an often-used control amplifier configuration with minimum loop gain of unity
3.129
3.8.9
Current-mode control with oscillator-derived ramp compensation used in forward converters
3.131
3.9.1
Basic continuous-mode flyback and current waveforms
3.134
3.9.2
Effect on current waveforms of a small increase in duty ratio
3.135
3.9.3
Bode plot of continuous-mode flyback with duty ratio control
3.136
3.9.4
Bode plot of continuous-mode flyback with current-mode control
3.137
3.10.1
Open-loop flyback converter, showing the principles of current-mode control
3.140
3.10.2
Voltage and current waveforms of a discontinuous-mode flyback converter
3.140
3.10.3
Current-mode discontinuous flyback waveforms, showing pulse width and peak current
3.141
3.10.4
Current mode discontinuous flyback with closed-voltage-loop and clamp zener power limiting 3.142
3.10.5
Forward converter (buck-derived), with closed-voltage-loop current-mode control
3.143
3.10.6
Waveforms for continuous-inductor-current, current-mode-controlled forward converters
3.144
3.10.7
Current waveforms for continuous-inductor-current buck-derived converters
3.145
3.10.8
Transfer function of current-mode converter and single-pole compensation network 
3.147
3.10.9
Transfer function with duty ratio control and more complex compensation network required
3.148
3.10.10
Waveforms of a boost converter showing the cause of the right-half-plane zero
3.151
3.10.11
DC charge restoration circuits for current-mode-controlled half-bridge converters
3.153
3.11.1
Optically coupled voltage control loop, using voltage reference on the secondary
3.158
3.11.2
Optical coupler transfer function showing temperature-dependent transfer ratio
3.158
3.11.3
An example of an optically coupled pulse-width modulator using the TL431 shunt regulator
3.159
3.11.4
Optically coupled PWM with control amplifier closed loop gain of less than unity
3.161
3.12.1
Typical ripple current multiplying factor vs. ambient temperature for electrolytic capacitors
3.165
3.12.2
Electrolytic capacitor ripple current factors vs. frequency, with voltage rating as a parameter
3.165
3.13.1
Waveforms caused by inductance in a resistive current measurement shunt at high frequency
3.170
3.13.2
Two fabrication methods used for high-frequency, low-inductance current shunts
3.171
3.14.1
Effect of current transformer magnetization current on unidirectional pulse measurement
3.175
3.14.2
Unidirectional current transformer and waveforms in single-ended forward converter
3.176
3.14.3
A full-wave current transformer used in push-pull and half-bridge circuits
3.181
3.14.4
Two possible positions for a current transformer in a buck regulator circuit
3.181
3.14.5
Flyback-type current transformer in the collector of a buck regulator switching transistor
3.182
3.14.6
A DC current transformer and polarizing circuit in the secondary of a forward converter
3.184
3.14.7
DC current transformerforward (core set) B/H curve, andcore reset current waveform 
3.185
3.14.8
Transfer characteristic of DC current transformer
3.187
3.14.9
A unidirectional current transformer in the secondary of a flyback converter
3.188
3.15.1
Current probe for high-frequency unidirectional pulse measurement and waveforms
3.191
3.15.2
High-current ac current probe circuit and waveforms showing effect of magnetization current 3.195
3.16.1
Relative failure ratios of NPN silicon semiconductors as a function of temperature
3.198
3.16.2
Thermal resistance modeling of D04 diode on finned heat exchanger
3.201
3.16.3
Thermal resistance example, showing a T03 transistor on a finned heat exchanger
3.205
Delete a page from a pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Delete a page from a pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page in a pdf file; cut pages out of pdf online
LIST
xxxi
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
3.16.4
Thermal resistance examples on a water-cooled (near infinite) heat sink
3.208
3.16.5
Effect of screw torque and heat sink compound on TO3 effective thermal resistance 
3.209
3.16.6
Thermal resistance as a function of air velocity for various heat exchanger sizes
3.210
3.16.7
Free air cooling efficiency as a function of altitude
3.211
3.16.8
Ratio of thermal resistance of a length of finned heat sink extrusion to that of longer lengths
3.211
3.16.9
Thermal radiation vs. heat sink temperature differential, with surface finish as a parameter
3.213
3.16.10
Thermal resistance of heat exchangers vs. heat exchanger volume, with air flow as parameter 3.214
3.16.11
Thermal resistance correction factor vs. heat exchanger temperature differential
3.215
3.16.12
Thermal resistance vs. surface area, with surface finish and mounting plane as parameters
3.216
Part 4
4.1.1
Passive power factor correction circuits
4.5
4.1.2
Sine waveforms at the input of a capacitive load, showing the current leading the voltage
4.5
4.1.3
Vector diagram showing how apparent power exceeds real power in a reactive load
4.6
4.1.4
Capacitor input stages for direct-off-line switchmode and isolated linear power supplies
4.7
4.1.5
Rectifier output waveforms with large capacitive load showing large discontinuous peak currents  4.7
4.1.6
Passive LCR input filter typically used in passive power factor corrected magnetic ballasts
4.10
4.1.7
Valley-fill power factor correction circuit used in low-power applications
4.11
4.1.8
Typical current waveform at the input to the Spangler circuit
4.11
4.1.9
An improved valley-fill circuit
4.12
4.1.10
Current waveform at the input of the improved Spangler circuit
4.12
4.1.11
Bridge rectifier used and haversine voltage produced for active power factor correction system 4.14
4.1.12
A basic boost regulator, showing the essential control elements
4.15
4.1.13
Input ripple current waveform to discontinuous-mode power factor correction boost stage 
4.17
4.1.14
Input ripple current waveform to continuous-mode power factor correction boost stage 
4.18
4.1.15
Input ripple current waveform to hysteretic-mode power factor correction boost stage 
4.18
4.1.16
Basic power topologies, derived from boost or buck-boost topologies
4.21
4.1.17
Basic power topologies, derived from buck topology
4.25
4.1.18
Basic power topologies, derived from combination topologies
4.28
4.1.19
Basic power topology for a non-isolated, power factor correction, positive boost regulator
4.30
4.1.20
Power factor correction boost regulator with fast inner-loop current-control stage
4.34
4.1.21
Power factor correction boost regulator with outer-loop to maintain the output voltage constant  4.36
4.1.22
Basic power factor correction boost-buck combination providing regulated variable DC output 4.41
4.1.23
The control circuit for combination boost-buck power factor correction converter
4.44
4.1.24
Block diagram of the Micro Linear ML 4956-1 control IC used in Fig.1.4.23
4.45
4.1.25
Modulator gain with input voltage change, under normal and power-limiting conditions
4.48
4.1.26
Current transfer characteristics of the gain modulator for mean input voltage change
4.51
4.1.27
Buck stage drive buffer with “or” function to provide a wide range for the duty ratio
4.53
4.1.28
Output voltage level-shifting circuit and voltage error amplifier stage with variable reference
4.54
4.1.29
Boost input stage with inrush limiting current bypass diode and ripple current steering 
4.59
4.1.30
Low-loss voltage snubber circuit with 24-V fan drive
4.61
4.2.1
Outline schematic for a boost regulator developing a 200-volt output from a 100-volt input
4.71
4.2.2
Outline schematic of a series resonant circuit commonly used in fluorescent lamp applications 4.73
4.2.3
Parallel resonant 30-kHz sine wave 68-watt electronic ballast for two F32T8 instant start lamps 4.75
4.2.4
(A-D) Waveforms expected from the parallel resonant ballast shown in Fig. 4.2.3
4.76
4.2.4
(E-I) Waveforms expected from the parallel resonant ballast shown in Fig. 4.2.3
4.77
4.2.5
How the transformer T1 should be made up with butt-gap and built up insulation
4.85
4.3.1
Basic power converter stage of a 5-kW DC to DC converter with phase shift modulation 
4.89
4.3.2
Basic power circuit of Fig. 4.3.1, with essential snubbing components added
4.90
4.3.3
Active components in the primary bridge at start of a cycle of twelve transitions
4.92
4.3.4
The first transition, when Q4 turns “off ” and current continues to flow into node “B”
4.93
4.3.5
Substrate capacitor C2 transposed to C2e, and considered in parallel with C4e
4.94
4.3.6
Equivalent circuit during the upper flywheel action; Q1 is fully “on”, and Q4 is fully “off ”
4.95
4.3.7
Voltage and current waveforms during the first two transitions
4.96
4.3.8
Third transition, where Q2 turns “on” under zero voltage conditions
4.97
4.3.9
Fourth transition, where Q1 turns “off ” under ZVS conditions 
4.98
4.3.9
At transition 5, D3 conducts, node “D” is clamped near zero, and the current in C1 goes to zero 4.98
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
add and delete pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete page pdf file
xxxii
LIST
List of Figures and  Tables (cont.)
Figure
Caption
Page
4.3.10
Sixth transition with Q3 turned “on” and current reversed
4.99
4.3.11
Seventh and eighth transitions: Q2 turns “off” under ZVS, and D4 clamps node “B” to zero
4.100
4.3.12
Ninth transition, where Q4 turns “on” under ZVS
4.101
4.3.13
Tenth and eleventh transitions; Q3 turns “off ” under ZVS, D1 conducts and clamps node “D” 4.102
4.3.14
Twelfth transition where Q1 turns “on”
4.103
4.3.15
Active components during the first right side transition, when Q4 turns “off”
4.104
4.3.16
Waveforms during the right side transition
4.105
4.3.17
Active components during a left side transition
4.107
4.3.18
Primary bridge and secondary rectifier sections with secondary snubber components
4.109
4.3.19
Waveforms during turn “off ” action with finite FET turn “off” delays
4.110
4.3.20
Primary bridge power waveforms for a complete cycle of operations with 50% duty cycle
4.114
4.3.21
Basic interface between the control IC and one side of the bridge
4.115
4.3.22
More powerful drive interface, suitable for high power applications
4.116
4.3.23
Timing for the four power FET gate drive waveforms
4.118
4.3.24
Timing for the four power FET gate drive waveforms with a phase shift of 180 degrees
4.119
4.3.25
Timing for the four power FET gate drive waveforms with a phase shift of 90 degrees
4.120
4.4.1
Basic FET resonant inverter
4.124
4.4.2
Voltage waveforms in the resonant inverter
4.125
4.4.3
Basic resonant inverter with cross-coupled capacitors
4.127
4.4.4
Improved gate drive circuit
4.128
4.4.5
Gate drive waveform in the improved circuit, showing voltage skewing and correction
4.129
4.5.1
Basic Wien Bridge oscillator, with nodes and designations for reference
4.134
4.5.2
Wide range voltage controlled oscillator with designations corresponding to Fig. 4.5.1
4.134
4.5.3
Voltage controlled resistor (VCR), implemented with OTA as configured in the VCO
4.135
LIST OF TABLES
Table
Caption
Page
Part 1
1.2.1
Surge Voltages and Currents Recommended for Use in Designing Protective Systems
1.18
1.3.1
Maximum Ground Leakage Currents Permitted by the Safety Regulations
1.34
Part 2
2.15. 1
Toroidal Core Dimensions
2.130
2.15.2
Windings for Ferrite Toroidal Cores
2.131
2.19.1
Ec Transformer Parameters And Core Loss
2.159
2.21.1
Properties of Typical Square-Loop Magnetic Material
2.185
Part 3
3.1.1
AWG Winding Data (Copper Wire, Heavy Insulation)
3.23
3.2.1
General Material Properties 
3.30
3.2.2
Iron Powder E Core and Bobbin Parameters 
3.33
3.3B.1
Resistance Factor and Effective Area Product for EC Cores, Round Magnet Wire at 100°C
3.61
3.4.1
Overall Copper Utilization Factors K’ for Standard Converter Types 
3.68
3.10.1
Summary of Performance for Current-Mode Control Topologies 
3.154
3.12.1
Typical Electrolytic Capacitor Ripple Current Ratings
3.164
3.16.1
Heat Storage Capacity and Thermal Resistance of Common Heat Exchanger Metals 
3.204
3.16.2
Thermal Resistance, Maximum Temperatures, and Dielectric Constant of Insulating Materials  3.206
3.16.3
Typical Thermal Resistance of Case to Mounting Surface of T0–3 and T0–220 Transistors 
3.206
3.16.4
Typical Emissivity of Common Metals as a Function of Surface Finish and Color 
3.212
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete pages in pdf
FUNCTIONS AND 
REQUIREMENTS 
COMMON TO MOST 
DIRECT-OFF-LINE 
SWITCHMODE 
POWER SUPPLIES 
P
L
A
L
R
L
T
L
1
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
pdf delete page; delete page in pdf preview
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete page numbers in pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
This page intentionally left blank 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf file online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a specific to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Free .NET PDF SDK library download and online C#
delete page from pdf preview; delete page in pdf file
1.3
CHAPTER 1
COMMON REQUIREMENTS: 
AN OVERVIEW 
1.1 INTRODUCTION 
The “direct-off-line” switchmode supply is  so  called because  it takes its power  input 
directly from the ac power lines, without using the rather large low-frequency (60 to 50 Hz) 
isolation transformer normally found in linear power supplies. 
Although the various switchmode conversion techniques are often very different in 
terms of circuit design, they have, over many years, developed very similar basic functional 
characteristics that have become generally accepted industry standards. 
Further, the need to satisfy various national and international safety, electromagnetic 
compatibility, and line transient requirements has forced the adoption of relatively standard 
techniques for track and component spacing, noise filter design, and transient protection. 
The prudent designer will be familiar with all these agency needs before proceeding with 
a design. Many otherwise sound designs have failed as a result of their inability to satisfy 
safety agency standards. 
Many of the requirements outlined in this section will be common to all switching sup-
plies, irrespective of the design strategy or circuit. Although the functions tend to remain 
the same for all units, the circuit techniques used to obtain them may be quite different. 
There are many ways of meeting these needs, and there will usually be a best approach for 
a particular application. 
The designer must also consider all the minor facets of the specification before decid-
ing on a design strategy. Failure to consider at an early stage some very minor system 
requirement could completely negate a design approach—for example, power good and 
power failure indicators and signals, which require an auxiliary supply irrespective of the 
converter action, would completely negate a design approach which does not provide this 
auxiliary supply when the converter is inhibited! It can often prove to be very difficult to 
provide for some minor neglected need at the end of the design and development exercise. 
The remainder of Chap. 1 gives an overview of the basic input and output functions 
most often required by the user or specified by national or international standards. They 
will assist in the checking or development of the initial specification, and all should be 
considered before moving to the design stage. 
1.2 INPUT TRANSIENT VOLTAGE PROTECTION 
Both artificial and naturally occurring electrical phenomena cause very large transient volt-
ages on all but fully conditioned supply lines from time to time. 
1.4
PART 1
IEEE Standard 587–1980 shows the results of an investigation of this phenomenon at 
various locations. These are classified as low-stress class A, medium-stress class B, and 
high-stress class C locations. Most power supplies will be in low- and medium-risk loca-
tions, where stress levels may reach 6000 V at up to 3000 A. 
Power supplies are often required to protect themselves and the end equipment from 
these stress conditions. To meet this need requires special protection devices. (See Part 1, 
Chap. 2.) 
1.3 ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY 
Input Filters 
Switching power supplies are electrically noisy, and to meet the requirements of the various 
national and international RFI (radio-frequency interference) regulations for conducted-
mode noise, a differential- and common-mode noise filter is normally fitted in series with 
the line inputs. The attenuation factor required from this noise filter depends on the power 
supply size, operating frequency, power supply design, application, and environment. 
For domestic and office equipment, such as personal computers, VDUs, and so on, the 
more stringent regulations apply, and FCC class B or similar limits would normally be 
applied. For industrial applications, the less severe FCC class A or similar limits would 
apply. (See Part 1, Chap. 3.) 
It is important to appreciate that it is very difficult to cure a badly designed supply by 
fitting filters. The need for minimum noise coupling must be considered at all stages of the 
design; some good guidelines are covered in Part 1, Chaps. 3 and 4. 
1.4 DIFFERENTIAL-MODE NOISE 
Differential-mode noise refers to the component of high-frequency electrical noise between 
any two supply or output lines. For example, this would be measured between the live and 
neutral input lines or between the positive and negative output lines. 
1.5 COMMON-MODE NOISE 
For the line input, common-mode noise refers to that component of electrical noise that 
exists between both supply lines (in common) and the earth (ground) return.
For the outputs, the position is more complicated, as various configurations of isolated 
and nonisolated connections are possible. In general, output common-mode noise refers 
to the electrical noise between any output and some common point, usually the chassis or 
common return line. 
Some specifications,  notably those applying  to  medical  electronics, severely  limit 
the amount of ground return current permitted between either supply line and the earth 
(ground) return. A ground return current normally flows through the filter capacitors and 
leakage capacitance to ground, even if the insulation is perfect. The return current limitation 
can have a significant effect on the design of the supply and the size of input filter capaci-
tors. In any event, capacitors in excess of 0.01 MF between the live line and ground are not 
permitted by many safety standards. 
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.5
1.6 FARADAY SCREENS 
High-frequency conducted-mode noise (noise conducted along the supply or output leads) 
is normally caused by capacitively coupled currents in the ground plane or between input 
and output circuits. For this reason, high-voltage switching devices should not be mounted 
on the chassis. Where this cannot be avoided, a Faraday screen should be fitted between 
the noise source and the ground plane, or at least the capacitance to the chassis should be 
minimized.
To reduce input-to-output noise coupling in isolating transformers, Faraday screens 
should be fitted. These should not be confused with the more familiar safety screens. (See 
Part 1, Chap. 4.) 
1.7 INPUT FUSE SELECTION 
The fuse is an often neglected part of power supply design. Modern fuse technology makes 
available a wide range of fuses designed to satisfy closely defined parameters. Voltages, 
inrush currents, continuous currents, and let-through energy (I2t ratings) should all be con-
sidered. (See Part 1, Chap. 5.) 
Where units are dual-input-voltage-rated, it may be necessary to use a lower fuse current 
rating for the higher input voltage condition. Standard, medium-speed glass cartridge fuses 
are universally available and are best used where possible. For line input applications, the 
current rating should take into account the 0.6 to 0.7 power factor of the capacitive input 
filter used in most switchmode systems. 
For best protection the input fuse should have the minimum current rating that will reli-
ably sustain the inrush current and maximum operating currents of the supply at minimum 
line inputs. However, it should be noted that the rated fuse current given in the fuse manu-
facturer’s data is for a limited service life, typically a thousand hours operation. For long 
fuse life, the normal power supply current should be well below the maximum fuse rating; 
the larger the margin, the longer the fuse life. 
Fuse selection is therefore a compromise between long life and full protection. Users 
should be aware that fuses wear with age and should be replaced at routine servicing peri-
ods. For maximum safety during fuse replacement, the live input is normally fused at a 
point after the input switch. 
To satisfy safety agency requirements and maintain maximum protection, when fuses 
are replaced, a fuse of the same type and rating must be used. 
1.8 LINE RECTIFICATION AND CAPACITOR 
INPUT FILTERS 
Rectifier capacitor input filters have become almost universal for direct-off-line switch-
mode power supplies. In such systems the line input is directly rectified into a large elec-
trolytic reservoir capacitor. 
Although this circuit is small, efficient, and low-cost, it has the disadvantage of demand-
ing short, high-current pulses at the peak of the applied sine-wave input, causing excessive 
line I2R losses, harmonic distortion, and a low power factor. 
In some applications (e.g., shipboard equipment), this current distortion cannot be toler-
ated, and special low-distortion input circuits must be used. (See Part 1, Chap. 6.)
1.6
PART 1
1.9 INRUSH LIMITING 
Inrush limiting reduces the current flowing into the input terminals when the supply is 
first switched on. It should not be confused with “soft start,” which is a separate function 
controlling the way the power converter starts its switching action. 
In the interests of minimum size and weight, most switchmode supplies use semicon-
ductor rectifiers and low-impedance input electrolytics in a capacitive input filter configu-
ration. Such systems have an inherently low input resistance; also, because the capacitors 
are initially discharged, very large surge currents would occur at switch-on if such filters 
were switched directly to the line input. 
Hence, it is normal practice to provide some form of current inrush limiting on power 
supplies that have capacitive input filters. This inrush limiting typically takes the form of a 
resistive limiting device in series with the supply lines. In high-power systems, the limiting 
resistance would normally be removed (shorted out) by an SCR, triac, or switch when the 
input reservoir and/or filter capacitor has been fully charged. In low-power systems, NTC 
thermistors are often used as limiting devices. 
The selection of the inrush-limiting resistance value is usually a compromise between 
acceptable inrush current amplitude and start-up delay time. Negative temperature coef-
ficient thermistors are often used in low-power applications, but it should be noted that 
thermistors will not always give full inrush limiting. For example, if, after the power supply 
has been running long enough for the thermistor to heat up, the input is turned rapidly off 
and back on again, the thermistor will still be hot and hence low-resistance, and the inrush 
current will be large. The published specification should reflect this effect, as it is up to the 
user to decide whether this limitation will cause any operational problems. Since even with 
a hot NTC the inrush current will not normally be damaging to the supply, thermistors are 
usually acceptable and are often used for low-power applications. (See Part 1, Chap. 7.) 
1.10 START-UP METHODS 
In direct-off-line switchmode supplies, the elimination of the low-frequency (50 to 60 Hz) 
transformer can present problems with system start-up. The difficulty usually stems from 
the fact that the high-frequency power transformer cannot be used for auxiliary supplies 
until the converter has started. Suitable start-up circuits are discussed in Part 1, Chap. 8.
1.11 SOFT START 
Soft start is the term used to describe a low-stress start-up action, normally applied to the 
pulse-width-modulated converter to reduce transformer and output capacitor stress and to 
reduce the surge on the input circuits when the converter action starts. 
Ideally, the input reservoir capacitors should be fully charged before converter action 
commences; hence, the converter start-up should be delayed for several line cycles, then 
start with a narrow, progressively increasing pulse width until the output is established. 
There are a number of reasons why the pulse width should be narrow when the converter 
starts, and progressively increase during the start-up phase. There will often be consider-
able capacitance on the output lines, and this should be charged slowly so that it does not 
reflect an excessive transient back to the supply lines. Further, where a push-pull action is 
applied to the main transformer, flux doubling and possible saturation of the core may occur 
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.7
if a wide pulse is applied to the transformer for the first half cycle of operation. (See Part 3, 
Chap. 7.) Finally, since an inductor will invariably appear somewhere in series with the cur-
rent path, it may be impossible to prevent voltage overshoot on the output if this inductor 
current is allowed to rise to a high value during the start-up phase. (See Part 1, Chap. 10.) 
1.12 START-UP OVERVOLTAGE PREVENTION 
When the power supply is first switched on, the control and regulator circuits are not in 
their normal working condition (unless they were previously energized by some auxiliary 
supply).
As a result of the limited output range of the control and driver circuits, the large-signal 
slew rate may be very nonlinear and slow. Hence, during the start-up phase, a “race” condi-
tion can exist between the establishment of the output voltages and correct operation of the 
control circuits. This can result in excessive output voltage overshoot. 
Additional fast-acting voltage clamping circuits may be required to prevent overshoot 
during the start-up phase, a need often overlooked in the past by designers of both discrete 
and integrated control circuits. (See Part 1, Chap. 10.) 
1.13 OUTPUT OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION 
Loss of voltage control can result in excessive output voltages in both linear and switch-
mode supplies. In the linear supply (and some switching regulators), there is a direct DC 
link between input and output circuits, so that a short circuit of the power control device 
results in a large and uncontrolled output. Such circuits require a powerful overvoltage 
clamping technique, and typically an SCR “crowbar” will short-circuit the output and open 
a series fuse. 
In the direct-off-line SMPS, the output is isolated from the input by a well-insulated 
transformer. In such systems, most failures result in a low or zero output voltage. The need 
for crowbar-type protection is less marked, and indeed is often considered incompatible 
with size limitations. In such systems, an independent signal level voltage clamp which acts 
on the converter drive circuit is often considered satisfactory for overvoltage protection. 
The design aim is that a single component failure within the supply will not cause an 
overvoltage condition. Since this aim is rarely fully satisfied by the signal level clamp-
ing techniques often used (for example, an insulation failure is not fully protected), the 
crowbar and fuse technique should still be considered for the most exacting switchmode 
designs. The crowbar also provides some protection against externally induced overvolt-
age conditions. 
1.14 OUTPUT UNDERVOLTAGE PROTECTION 
Output undervoltages can be caused by excessive transient current demands and power out-
ages. In switchmode supplies, considerable energy is often stored in the input capacitors, 
and this provides “holdup” of the outputs during short power outages. However, transient 
current demands can still cause under-voltages as a result of limited current ratings and 
output line voltage drop. In systems that are subject to large transient demands, the active 
undervoltage prevention circuit described in Part 1, Chap. 12 should be considered. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested