c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete page pdf file software SDK cloud windows wpf web page class Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi30-part498

2.68
PART 2
direction under the forcing action of L
s
, bringing diode D2 into conduction. (This diode is 
often referred to as the flywheel diode, as it allows the current to continue circulating in the 
loop D2, L
s
,C
o
, and load.) The voltage across the choke L
s
is now reversed, with a value 
equal to the output voltage (neglecting diode voltage drops). The current in L
s
will now 
decrease as defined by the following equation:

di
dt
V
out
s
L
Using the same design criterion that was applied to the flyback converter transformer, the 
volt-seconds applied to the choke L
s
in the forward and reverse directions must be equal for 
steady-state conditions. Hence, when the on and off periods are equal, the output voltage 
will be half V
s
(once again neglecting diode drops and losses).
The mean value of the inductor current is the required output current I
dc
. It should be 
noted at this stage that the absolute value of inductor L
s
has not been defined, as it does 
not change the action of the circuit in principle; its value simply controls the peak-to-peak 
ripple current.
8.2.2 Output Voltage
When the ratio of the “on” time to the “off” time is reduced from the 50% duty factor, 
the output voltage will fall until forward and reverse volt-seconds equality is once again 
obtained. The output voltage is defined by the following equation:
V
Vt
t
t
s
out
on
on
off

where V
s
 secondary voltage, peak V
t
on
 time that Q1 is conducting, μs 
t
off
 time that Q1 is “off,” μs 
FIG. 2.8.1 Forward (buck-derived) converter with energy recovery winding, showing inter-
winding capacitance C
c
.
Delete page pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages pdf preview
Delete page pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf preview; delete pages of pdf online
8. DIRECT-OFF-LINE SINGLE-ENDED FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.69
Note: The ratio t
on
/(t
on
+ t
off
) is called the duty ratio, duty cycle, or mark space ratio.
It should be noted that when the input voltage and duty cycle are fixed, the output 
voltage is independent of load current (to the first order), and this topology provides an 
inherently low output resistance.
8.3 LIMITING FACTORS FOR THE VALUE 
OF THE OUTPUT CHOKE 
8.3.1 Minimum Choke Inductance and Critical Load Current 
The minimum value of L
s
is normally controlled by the need to maintain continuous con-
duction at minimum load current. Figure 2.8.2 shows continuous-mode conduction in the 
top waveform, and discontinuous-mode conduction in the lower waveform. It should be 
noted that if the input and output voltages remain constant, the slope of the current wave-
form does not change as the load current is reduced. 
FIG. 2.8.2 Secondary current waveforms, showing incomplete energy transfer 
(coninuous-mode operation) and complete energy transfer (discontinuous-mode 
operation).
As the load current I
dc
decreases, a critical value is reached where the minimum value 
of the ripple current in the choke will just touch zero. At this point the critical load current 
is equal to the mean ripple current in the choke and is defined as follows:
I
I
L
dc
p p

)
2
where I
dc
 output (load) current
I
L(p-p)
 peak-to-peak choke current 
At load currents below this critical value, L
s
will go into a discontinuous current mode of 
operation. However, this is not an ultimate minimum limit to the load current, since the 
output voltage can still be maintained constant by reducing the mark space ratio. Still, at 
the critical current, there is a sudden change in the transfer function. At currents higher than 
critical, the mark space ratio will remain nearly constant, irrespective of load current (con-
tinuous-mode operation). Below the critical value, the mark space ratio must be adjusted for 
both load variations and input voltage variations (discontinuous-mode operation).
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages on pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pdf page acrobat
2.70
PART 2
Although the control circuit can be designed to be stable for these two conditions, the 
stability criteria must be carefully checked. There will be two poles in the transfer func-
tion for the continuous mode, and only one pole for the discontinuous mode. (See Part 3, 
Chap. 8.)
A second limiting factor to the value of L1 may come into play for multiple-output 
applications. If the control loop is closed to the main output line, and the current on this line 
is taken below the critical value, then the mark space ratio will be reduced to maintain the 
output voltage on this line constant. The remaining auxiliary outputs, which are assumed to 
have constant loads on them, will respond to this variation in duty ratio, and their voltages 
will fall. This is the reverse of what might be expected. It is usually the need to maintain 
the auxiliary output voltages constant which controls the minimum value of L
s
in multiple-
output units. Even then, a current in excess of the critical value must be maintained on the 
main output if the auxiliary voltages are to be maintained reasonably constant.
8.3.2 Maximum Choke Inductance 
The maximum value of L
s
is usually limited by considerations of efficiency, size, and cost. 
Large inductors carrying DC currents are expensive. From a performance standpoint, large 
values of L
s
will limit the maximum rate of change (slew rate) of the output current for large 
transient load changes. The output capacitor C
o
is usually much too small to maintain the 
output voltage constant for large load changes in this type of converter.
8.4 MULTIPLE OUTPUTS 
Extra windings on the main transformer can provide additional auxiliary outputs. Once 
again, the value of secondary voltage will be chosen so that the volt-seconds on the output 
chokes in the forward and reverse directions will equate to zero under steady-state con-
ditions. Therefore, if the voltage of the main output line is stabilized, the voltage of the 
auxiliary lines will also be stabilized, provided that the load conditions remain reasonably 
constant. If the load on any output falls below the critical current for its particular choke, 
then the output voltage on this line will begin to rise. Eventually, under zero load condi-
tions, it will be equal to the peak voltage on the transformer secondary. (For a 50% duty 
cycle, this would be twice the normal output voltage.) 
Hence, whereas in the flyback converter transformer the secondary voltages are all 
clamped by the main output and are thus well defined, in the forward converter the output 
voltages for loads below critical can be very high. Therefore, in the forward converter it is 
essential that the critical value of inductor currents is lower than the minimum load pre-
sented to the output. If the load is required to go to zero or near zero, it will be necessary 
to provide dummy loading or voltage clamping to prevent excessive output voltages. This 
problem can be very much reduced by using coupled output inductors for multiple-output 
applications. (See Refs. 15 and 48.) 
8.5 ENERGY RECOVERY WINDING (P2) 
During the “on” period of transistor Q1, energy will be transferred to the output circuit. At 
the same time, the primary of the transformer will take a magnetizing current component 
and store energy in the magnetic field of the core. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages pdf online; delete page on pdf reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
8. DIRECT-OFF-LINE SINGLE-ENDED FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.71
When Q1 turns off, this stored energy will result in damagingly large flyback voltages 
on the collector of the switching transistor Q1 unless a clamping, or energy recovery, action 
is provided. 
Note: During the flyback (“off”) period, the output diodes will be reverse-biased and will 
not provide any clamping action, unlike the flyback converter. 
In this example an “energy recovery winding” P2 and diode D3 are connected so that the 
stored energy will be returned to the supply line during the flyback period. Note that during 
the flyback period, the voltage across the flyback winding P2 is being clamped at V
c
by D3, 
with the finish of the winding being positive. Hence, the voltage on the transistor collector 
will be twice V
c
(assuming that the primary and flyback turns are equal), because the start 
of the primary is already connected to the supply voltage V
c
.
To prevent excessive leakage inductance between P1 and P2, and hence excessive volt-
age overshoot on the transistor collector, it is conventional to bifilar-wind the energy recov-
ery winding P2 with the main primary P1. In this arrangement it is important that diode 
D3 be placed in the top end of the energy recovery winding. The reason for this is that the 
interwinding capacitance C
c
(which can be considerable with a bifilar winding) will appear 
as a parasitic capacitance between the collector of Q1 and the junction of P2 and D3, as 
shown by parasitic capacitor C
c
in Fig. 2.8.1. When connected in this way, this capacitance 
is isolated from the collector by diode D3 during the turn-on of Q1. Hence D3 blocks any 
current flow in C
c
during the turn-on transient of Q1. (Note that the finishes of both wind-
ings P1 and P2 go negative together, and there is no change of voltage across C
c
.) Further, 
C
c
provides additional clamping action on the collector of transistor Q1 during the flyback 
period, when any tendency for voltage overshoot will result in a current flow through C
c
and back to the supply line via D3. Very often this parasitic winding capacitance will be 
supplemented by an extra real external capacitor in position C
c
to improve this clamping 
action. However, add extra capacitance with care, as too large a value will result in line 
ripple frequency modulation in the output voltage.
As a result of the high-voltage stress across the bifilar winding in high-voltage off-
line applications, special insulation would normally be required. However, if an additional 
clamping capacitor C
c
is fitted, the energy recovery winding may be wound on a sepa-
rate (nonbifilar) insulated layer. This reduces the voltage stress without compromising 
the clamping action. Alternatively, low-loss energy snubber systems, as shown in Part 1, 
Chap. 18, may be used.
8.6 ADVANTAGES
Some of the advantages of the forward converter, when compared with the flyback, are as 
follows: 
1. The transformer copper losses in the forward converter tend to be somewhat lower, since 
the peak currents in primary and secondary will tend to be lower than in the flyback case 
(the inductance is higher, as no air gap is required). Although this may result in a smaller 
temperature rise in the transformer, in most cases the improvement is not sufficient to 
allow a smaller core to be used. 
2. The reduction in secondary ripple currents is dramatic. The action of the output induc-
tor and flywheel diode maintains a reasonably constant current in the output load and 
reservoir capacitors. 
Since the energy stored in the output inductor is available to the load, the reservoir 
capacitor can be made quite small, its main function being to reduce output ripple 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pdf pages online; delete page pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete page from pdf preview
2.72
PART 2
voltage. Furthermore, the ripple current rating for this capacitor will be much lower than 
that required for the flyback case.
3. The peak current in the primary switching device is lower, for the same reason as in 
point 1.
4. Because of the reduction in ripple current, the output ripple voltages will tend to be lower.
8.7 DISADVANTAGES
Some of the disadvantages are
1. Increased cost is incurred because of the extra output inductor and flywheel diode. 
2. Under light loading conditions, when L
s
reverts to the discontinuous mode, excessive 
output voltages will be produced, particularly on auxiliary outputs, unless minimum 
loads are specified or provided by ballast resistors. 
In other respects, the performance to be expected from the forward converter is very similar 
to that of the flyback.
8.8 PROBLEMS
1. From what class of converters is the transformer-coupled forward converter derived? 
2. During what phase of operation is the energy transferred to the secondary circuit in the 
forward converter?
3. Why is an output choke required in the forward converter topology?
4. Why is the utilization of the primary switching device often much greater in the forward 
converter than in the flyback converter?
5. A core gap is not normally required in a forward converter transformer. Why is this?
6. Why is an energy recovery winding required in the forward converter?
7. Why is a minimum load required for correct operation of a forward converter?
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
The VB.NET PDF document splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page
reader extract pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete a page from a pdf; delete pdf pages ipad
2.73
TRANSFORMER DESIGN FOR 
FORWARD CONVERTERS
9.1 INTRODUCTION
The design of switchmode transformers for forward converters may be approached in 
many different ways. The designer should choose a method that he or she is comfort-
able with.
In the following example a nonrigorous design approach is used, starting with the 
primary  turns calculation. Manufacturers’ published nomograms are utilized for the 
selection of core size  and  optimum (minimum  total  loss) induction.  The  resulting 
transformer is suitable for prototype evaluation and will not be far from optimum. It 
should be remembered that for multiple-output applications, exact voltage results are 
not always going to be possible for all outputs, as winding turns can only be applied 
in increments of one, or in some cases one-half. Further, the core size will often be a 
compromise selection.
This design approach for the forward converter is very similar to the method used 
for the previous flyback example, except that the primary turns will be calculated 
for maximum “on” pulse width and nominal DC voltage. Again, this is an optimum 
loss design as opposed to a saturation limited design. The control circuit will prevent 
saturation. The result will have slightly more primary turns than the corresponding 
flyback.
The reason for this selection is that in the forward converter, the output inductor will 
limit the rate of change of output current when a transient load is applied. To compensate 
for this, the control amplifier will take the input pulse width to maximum so as to force 
an increase in inductor current as rapidly as possible. Under these transient conditions, the 
high primary voltage and maximum pulse width will be applied to the transformer primary 
at the same time. Although this only occurs for a short period, core saturation can occur 
unless the transformer is designed for this condition.
The control circuit will be designed so that at maximum line input voltages, the 
pulse width and the slew rate of the control circuit will be limited. This prevents 
maximum pulse width and line voltage from coinciding. This must be checked in the 
final design.
In the forward converter, it is undesirable to store energy in the core, as this energy must 
be returned to the supply line during the flyback period. A small gap may be required to 
ensure that the flux returns to a low residual level during the flyback period and to allow 
the maximum flux density excursion. The air gap will be kept as small as possible (two or 
three thousandths of an inch will usually be sufficient). An examination of Fig. 2.2.1a and b
CHAPTER 9
2.73
2.74
PART 2
shows that the residual flux will be much lower, even with a small gap in the core; also, a 
small gap will stabilize the magnetic parameters.
9.2 TRANSFORMER DESIGN EXAMPLE 
9.2.1 Step 1, Selecting Core Size
The core size is selected on the basis of transmitted power, and the manufacturers’ recom-
mendations make a good starting point. A typical core selection nomogram is shown in 
Fig. 2.2.2. In the following example, a transformer will be designed for a 100-W applica-
tion at 30 kHz. The output voltages and currents will be as follows:
+ 5 V at 10 A  50 W
+ 12 V at 2 A  24 W
– 12 V at 2 A  24 W
Total power  98 W
Input voltage 90–130 V or 180–260 V, 47–60 Hz
Allowing approximately 3% increase in size for each auxiliary line to provide extra insula-
tion and window space, an E core will be selected for a transmitted power of 100 W from 
Fig. 2.2.2; E42–15 would be a suitable selection.
Core parameters:
Effective core area A
e
 181 mm
9.2.2 Step 2, Select Optimum Induction
The optimum induction B
opt
is chosen so as to make the core and copper losses approxi-
mately equal. This gives minimum overall loss and maximum efficiency, provided that core 
saturation is avoided.
From Fig. 2.9.1, at 100 W and a frequency of 30 kHz, an optimum peak flux density 
B
opt
of approximately 150 mT is recommended for push-pull operation. Remember, in the 
push-pull case, the differential excitation ($B) will be twice this peak value, giving a flux 
density swing of 300 mT p–p. (See Fig. 2.9.2a.)
In Fig. 2.9.1, the recommended optimum flux density assumes the total peak-to-
peak excursion. Hence, in the single-ended forward converter, a flux density swing of 
300 mT would be indicated for maximum efficiency. Note that in the single-ended for-
ward converter, only the first quadrant of the BH characteristic is used (see Fig. 2.9.2b). 
To avoid saturation, it is necessary to allow some margin of safety for residual flux, 
the effects of high temperatures, and transient conditions. A total excursion of 250 mT 
(125 mT peak) is chosen in this example; this is less than optimum, and the design is said 
to be “saturation-limited.”
The core losses will now be somewhat lower than the copper losses. This will often be 
the case with single-ended converters unless the core has been designed for single-ended 
applications.
9. TRANSFORMER DESIGN FOR FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.75
9.2.3 Step 3, Calculate Primary Turns
Output power
100 W 
Selected core
E42–15
Frequency
30 kHz 
Flux density
250 mT
FIG. 2.9.1 Optimum working peak flux density for N27 ferrite material as a function of output 
power, with frequency and core size as parameters. (Courtesy of Siemens AG.)
FIG 2.9.2 (a) B/H loop showing the extended working range of B/H for push-pull opera-
tion. (b) First quadrant, showing limited B/H loop range for single-ended forward and 
flyback operation.
2.76
PART 2
The drive voltage waveform is square, so the primary turns will be calculated 
using the volt-seconds approach. The maximum pulse width is assumed to be 50% 
of the period.
Total period
s
T
f


r

1
1
30 10
33
3
M
Therefore
t
T
on
s
(max)
.


2
16 5 M
Calculate Primary Voltage (V
cc
). The primary voltage will be calculated for nominal input 
and full-load operation. The input rectifier network  will be configured for dual-range 
110/220-V operation, so a voltage doubler will be used at 110 V ac input.
The approximate conversion factors are
V
V
cc

r
r
rms
13 1 9
.
.
(See Part 1, Chap. 6.) Hence, at 110 V rms line input, the primary DC voltage V
cc
will be
110 1 3 1 9 272
r
r

.
.
V
Therefore, the minimum primary turns will be
N
V t
BA
e
min
ˆ

cc on
Where V
cc
 primary DC voltage, V
t
on
 maximum “on” time, μs
ˆ
B
 maximum flux density, T
A
e
 effective core area, mm2
Therefore
N
r
r

272 16 5
025 181
100
.
.
turns
9.2.4 Step 4, Calculate Secondary Turns
The secondary turns will be calculated for the lowest output voltage, in this case 5 V. The 
output filter and transformer secondary are shown in Fig. 2.9.3.
From Fig. 2.9.3, for continuous-current-mode operation,
V
Vt
t
t
s
out
on
on
off

9. TRANSFORMER DESIGN FOR FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.77
But at maximum pulse width, t
on
t
off
. Hence
V
V
s


2
10
out
V
Therefore, the minimum secondary voltage will be 10 V. Allowing for a 1-V drop in diode 
and inductor, V
s
becomes 11 V. This must be available at the minimum line input of 90 V 
and maximum “on” period of 16.5 μs.
At 90 V in the DC primary voltage, V
cc
will be
V
cc

r
r

90 1 3 1 9 222
.
.
V
With N
min
 100 turns on the primary, the volts per turn (V
pt
) will be
V
V
pt
cc



N
Vturn
222
100
2.22
/
and the minimum secondary turns will be
V
V
s
pt


11
222
495
.
. turns
The secondary turns are rounded up to 5 turns. The primary turns will be adjusted at this 
point as follows:
V
N
V
N
cc
p
s
s

Therefore
N
p

r

222 5
11
101 turns
In a similar way, the remaining 12-V output turns may be calculated. Once again, diode and 
choke winding loss of 1 V is estimated; therefore
V
V
V
s
(12
2 12 1 25
V) 2
V
out
drop

 r
 
FIG.  2.9.3 Output filter of  single-ended (buck-derived) 
forward converter.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested