c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from pdf in reader SDK application service wpf html web page dnn Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi32-part500

2.88
PART 2
In this example, a voltage-controlled feedback loop will be used and very fast transient 
response provided; consequently, during transient conditions, maximum voltage and pulse 
width can coincide. To prevent transformer saturation, the worst-case conditions will be 
used for the transformer primary design.
It will be assumed that the following parameters apply to the transformer design:
V
ac
 line input voltage, V ac
V
cc
 rectified DC converter voltage, V DC
f  converter frequency, kHz
t
on
 maximum “on” period, μs
t
off
 “off” period, μs
FIG. 2.11.1 Core size selection chart for forward converters, showing throughput power as a 
function of frequency with core size as a parameter. (Courtesy of Mullard Ltd.)
Delete pages from pdf in reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf document; delete pages pdf preview
Delete pages from pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pdf pages reader
11. TRANSFORMER DESIGN FOR DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.89
A
cp
 minimum core cross-sectional area, mm2
A
e
 effective core area (total core in mm2)
B´  maximum core flux density level, mT
B
opt
 optimum flux density vaule at operating frequency, mT
V
out
 output voltage, V DC
For this example, 
f  50 kHz
t
on
 10 μS (max)
A
cp
 100 mm2
A
e
 120 mm2
B
s
 350 mT at 100°C (Fig. 2.2.3)
B
opt
 170 mT at 50 kHz (Fig. 2.9.1)
V
out
 output voltage, 5 V
The line input voltage range V
ac
is 
Minimum 85
Nominal 110
Maximum 137
The DC voltage developed by the voltage doubler circuit and applied to the converter sec-
tion depends on a number of variable factors and hence is difficult to calculate accurately. 
Some of the major factors will be
Line source resistance
Resistance of EMI filter
Hot resistance of inrush thermistors (where used)
Rectifier drop
Size of doubler capacitance
Load current
Line frequency
Part 1, Chap. 6 shows a graphical method of establishing the approximate DC voltage and 
gives recommendations for capacitor selection. The final value of DC voltage V
cc
is prob-
ably best measured in the prototype model, as it is unlikely that all the variables will be 
known. For this example a simple empirical approximation for the minimum DC voltage 
will be used. For the voltage doubler connection at full load,
V
V
cc

r
r
ac
13 1 9
.
.
Hence
V
cc
minimum
209V
nominal 272 V
maximum
V



ª
«
­
338
¬¬
­
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page from pdf file online; delete blank pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf reader; delete pages from a pdf file
2.90
PART 2
From Fig. 2.9.1, the recommended flux density B
opt
(peak) for the EC41 core at 50 kHz is 
85 mT. This value is applicable for optimum design in the push-pull case. (Remember, 
for optimum design we aim to make copper loss and core loss about the same to give 
minimum overall loss). In push-pull converters the total change in flux density is from  B
opt
to  B
opt
, and the core loss is dependent on the total change $B. For the same core loss in the 
single-ended converter, B
opt
$B  2 r 85  170 mT because the flux density excursion 
is all in one quadrant (see Chap. 9). This flux density will apply at nominal input voltage 
for the effective core area A
e
. (It determines the core losses and so applies to nominal core 
size and normal input voltage.)
If this flux density is to apply at the nominal line voltage (110 V ac), then at maximum 
line voltage (137 V ac) and maximum pulse width the maximum flux density 
ˆ
B will be 
ˆ
(max)
(
)
B
B V
V
cc
cc


r

opt
nominal
m
170 380
222
290 TT
This is less than the saturation value for the core (Fig. 2.2.3) and hence is acceptable. 
11.1.3 Step 2, Primary Turns 
Since the primary waveform is a square wave, the minimum primary turns may be calcu-
lated using Faraday’s law: 
N
Vt
BA
e
min
ˆ

on
where V
cc
(max)  maximum DC supply voltage (380 V)
t
on
 maximum “on” period, MS (10 Ms)
ˆ
B
 maximum flux density, T (0.29 T)
A
e
 effective core area, mm2 (120 mm2)
Therefore
N
min
.

r
r

380 10
029 120
109 turns
Note: The effective core area A
e
is used here rather than the minimum area, as the flux level 
has been chosen for core loss considerations rather than maximum flux density. 
11.1.4 Step 3, Calculating Secondary Turns 
The required output voltage is 5 V. For the LC filter used in this example, the output voltage 
is related to the transformer secondary V
s
by the following equation:
V
V
t
t
t
s

out on
off
on
(
)
where V
s
 secondary voltage
V
out
 required output voltage (5 V)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages out of pdf; delete blank pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages pdf online
11. TRANSFORMER DESIGN FOR DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FORWARD CONVERTERS
2.91
In this example the secondary voltage will be calculated for the maximum duty ratio of 
50%, which will occur at minimum line input voltage. Hence t
on
t
off
, and the secondary 
voltage V
s
may be calculated:
V
s


510 10
10
10
(
)
V
Allowing an extra volt for diode voltage drop, and wiring and inductor resistance losses, 
the secondary voltage V
s
will be 11 V.
In this example, the maximum “on” period has been used, and the calculated second-
ary voltage is the minimum usable value. This must be available at minimum line voltage; 
hence the minimum secondary turns must be calculated for these conditions.
At a line voltage of 85 V, V
cc
will be 209 V.
Allowing a voltage drop of 2 V each for FET1 and FET2, the voltage applied to the 
primary V
p
will be
V
p

 
209 4 205V
Consequently, the minimum secondary turns will be
NV
V
p s
p

r

109 10
205
5.8 turns
The turns will be rounded up to 6 turns and the primary turns increased proportion-
ally, resulting in a lower flux density and core loss. Alternatively, the primary turns 
can stay at the same number; the control circuit will then reduce the pulse width to 
give the required output. This results in a larger pulse current amplitude but lower 
drop-out voltage.
The choice is with the designer.
11.2 DESIGN NOTES 
Under normal operating conditions, the pulse width required for 5 V out will be consider-
ably less than the maximum value of 50%. Consequently, the transformer will normally be 
operating with a smaller flux excursion, and the core losses will be optimized.
Under transient conditions, the maximum flux condition can occur. Consider the unit 
operating at maximum line input and minimum load. The input voltage V
cc
will be approxi-
mately 380 V. If the load is now suddenly applied to the output, the current in the output 
choke L1 cannot change immediately, and the output voltage will fall. Since the control 
amplifier is designed to give maximum transient response, it will rapidly increase the input 
pulse width to maximum (50% or 10 μs in this example).
The volt-seconds applied to the transformer primary will now be at maximum, and a 
maximum flux density condition will occur for a number of cycles as follows: 
ˆ
(
B
V t
N A
cc
p cp


r
r

on
mT
very clo
380 10
109 100
348
sse to saturation)
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
copy page from pdf; delete page pdf file
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; add and delete pages in pdf online
2.92
PART 2
where
ˆ
B maximum flux density in the smallest area of the core
A
cp
minimum core area (for this type of core the center leg is smaller than A
e
and the 
minimum core area is considered to check that no part of the core will saturate)
When the output current has built up to the required load value, the pulse width will return 
to its original value.
Hence, the requirement to sustain the high stress voltage together with maximum pulse 
width conditions (to give fast transient response) requires a larger number of primary turns 
with increased copper losses. However, fewer turns may be used if steps are taken to pre-
vent transformer saturation under transient conditions. Suitable methods would be
1. Reduced control-loop slew rate.
2. Primary current limiting (or control, which will recognize the onset of transformer satu-
ration and reduce the “on” period).
3. Provision of a pulse-width end stop which is inversely proportional to applied voltage.
Although all these methods result in reduced transient performance, the results will often 
be acceptable for most applications, and improved transformer efficiency may then be 
achieved by using fewer turns.
Suitable drive and control circuits will be found in Part 1, Chaps. 15 and 16, and the 
design of output chokes and filters in Part 3, Chaps. 1, 2, and 3.
To minimize the energy stored in the primary inductance, the transformer core is not 
normally gapped in the forward converter. A small gap will sometimes be introduced to 
reduce the effects of partial core saturation; however, this gap will rarely exceed 0.1 mm 
(0.004 in).
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pages pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
cut pages out of pdf online; cut pages from pdf file
2.93
HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL 
DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED 
CONVERTERS
12.1 INTRODUCTION
The half-bridge converter is a preferred topology for direct-off-line switchmode power 
supplies because of the reduced voltage stress on the primary switching devices. Further, 
the need for large input storage and filter capacitors, together with the common require-
ment for input voltage doubling circuits, supplies one-half of the bridge as a natural part 
of the input circuit topology.
12.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
Figure 2.12.1a shows the general arrangement of a power section for the half-bridge push-
pull converter. The switching transistors Q1 and Q2 form only one side of the bridge-
connected circuit, the remaining half being formed by the two capacitors C1 and C2. The 
major difference between this and the full bridge is that the primary of the transformer will 
see only half the supply voltage, and hence the current in the winding and switching transis-
tors will be twice that in the full-bridge case.
Assume steady-state conditions with capacitors C1 and C2 equally charged so that the 
voltage at the center point, node A, will be half the supply voltage V
cc
.
When the top transistor Q1 turns on, a voltage of half V
cc
will be applied across the pri-
mary winding T1p with the start going positive. A reflected load current and magnetization 
current will now build up in the transformer primary and Q1.
After a time defined by the control circuit, Q1 will be turned off.
Now, as a result of the primary and leakage inductances, current will continue to flow 
into the start of the primary winding, being supplied from the snubber capacitors, C3 and 
C4. The junction of Q1 and Q2 will swing negative, and if the energy stored in the primary 
leakage inductance is sufficiently large, diode D2 will eventually be brought into conduc-
tion to clamp any further negative excursion and return the remaining flyback energy to 
the supply.
The voltage at the center of Q1 and Q2 will eventually return to its original central value 
with a damped oscillatory action. Damping is provided by the snubber resistor R1.
After a period defined by the control circuit, Q2 will turn on, taking the start of the 
primary winding negative. Load and magnetizing currents will now flow in Q2 and into 
CHAPTER 12 
2.93
2.94
PART 2
the transformer primary winding finish so that the former process will repeat, but with the 
primary current in the opposite direction. The difference is that at the end of an “on” period, 
the junction of Q1 and Q2 will go positive, bringing D1 into conduction and returning the 
leakage inductance energy to the supply line. The junction of Q1 and Q2 will eventually 
return to the central voltage, with a damped oscillatory action. The cycle of operations is 
now complete and will continue. The waveforms are shown in Fig. 2.12.1b.
As C1 and C2 are the main reservoir capacitors for the input filter, their value is very 
large. Consequently, the voltage at the center point of C1 and C2, node A, will not change 
significantly during a cycle of operations.
The secondary circuit operates as follows: When Q1 is “on,” the start of all windings 
will go positive, and diode D3 will conduct. Current will flow in L1 and into the external 
load and capacitor C5.
When transistor Q1 turns off, the voltage on all transformer windings will fall toward 
zero, but current will continue to flow in the secondary diodes as a result of the forcing 
action of choke L1. When the secondary voltage has dropped to zero, diodes D3 and D4 
will share the inductor current nearly equally, acting as flywheel diodes and clamping the 
secondary voltage at zero.
A small but important effect to consider during the flywheel period is that the primary 
magnetizing current is transformed to the secondary, which flows in the two output diodes. 
Although this current is normally small compared with the load current, the effect is to 
FIG. 2.12.1 (a) Power section of half-bridge 
push-pull  forward  converter.  (b)  Collector 
voltage and current waveforms for half-bridge 
forward converter. 
12. HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED CONVERTERS
2.95
maintain the flux density at a constant value during the flywheel period. As a result, when 
the opposite transistor turns on, the full range of flux density swing from  B to  B is 
available. If the forward voltages of D3 and D4 are not matched, there will be a net voltage 
applied to the secondary during the flywheel period, and as this voltage is in the same direc-
tion for both “off” periods, it will drive the core toward saturation.
Under steady-state conditions, the current will increase in L1 during the “on” period and 
decrease during the “off ” period, with a mean value equal to the output current.
Neglecting losses, the output voltage is given by the equation 
V
V D
n
cc
out

where V
cc
 primary voltage
n  turns ratio N
p
/N
s
N
p
 primary turns
N
s
 secondary turns
D  duty ratio [t
on
/(t
on
+ t
off
)]
t
on
 “on” time 
t
off
 “off” time
Hence, by using suitable control circuits to adjust the duty ratio, the output voltage can be 
controlled and maintained constant for variations in supply or load.
12.3 SYSTEM ADVANTAGES
The half-bridge technique is often used, as it has a number of advantages, particularly for 
high-voltage operation, 
One major advantage is that transistors Q1 and Q2 will not be subjected to a voltage 
in excess of the supply voltage (plus a diode drop). Diodes D1 and D2 behave as energy 
recovery components and clamp the collectors to the supply line, eliminating any tendency 
for voltage overshoot. Consequently, the transistors work under well-defined voltage stress 
conditions.
The frequency doubling effect in the output biphase rectifiers provides two energy 
pulses for each cycle of operation, reducing the energy storage requirements for L1 and C5.
The series arrangement for input capacitors C1 and C2 lends itself to a simple voltage 
doubling approach when 110-V operation is required.
The transformer primary winding P1 and core flux density swing are fully utilized for 
both half cycles of operation. This provides better utilization of the transformer windings 
and core than the conventional push-pull converter, where one half winding is unused dur-
ing each half cycle. (A bridge rectifier in the output will provide the same action for the 
output winding, but this is usually reserved for high-voltage outputs for diode efficiency 
reasons.)
Finally, energy recovery windings are not required on the primary. This action is pro-
vided by D1 and D2 as a natural result of the topology.
12.4 PROBLEM AREAS
The designer must guard against a number of possible problems with this type of 
converter.
2.96
PART 2
A major difficulty is staircase saturation of the transformer core. If the average volt-
seconds applied to the primary winding for all positive-going pulses is not exactly equal 
to that for all negative-going pulses, the transformer flux density will increase with each 
cycle (staircase) into saturation. The same effect will occur if the secondary diode volt-
ages are unbalanced. As storage times and saturation voltages are rarely equal in the two 
transistors or diodes, this effect is almost inevitable unless active steps are taken to prevent 
it. A small gap in the transformer core will improve the tolerance to this effect, but will 
not eliminate it.
Fortunately, there is a natural compensation effect as the transformer approaches satu-
ration. The collector current in one transistor will tend to increase toward the end of an 
“on” period as the core starts to saturate. This results in a shorter storage time and hence a 
shorter period on that particular transistor, and some natural balancing action occurs.
However, where very fast switching transistors with low storage times or power FETs 
are used, there may be insufficient storage time for such natural corrective action.
To prevent staircase saturation, current-mode control can be used. For 110-V voltage 
doubler input rectifier connections, a DC path exists in the primary, and no special DC 
restoration circuits are required. However, for 220-V bridge operation, when current-mode 
control is used, a DC path through the primary must be provided, and special restoration 
circuits must be used. (See Part 3, Sec. 10.10.)
At lower power, a workable alternative is to select transistors Q1 and Q2 for near-
equivalent storage times. Output diodes D3 and D4 should be selected for equivalent for-
ward voltage drop at the working current. The transistor types and drive topology should 
be such that a reasonable storage time exists during the turnoff period.
Finally, the slew rate of the control amplifier must be slow so that large variations in 
pulse width cannot occur between cycles (otherwise the transistor that is operating near 
saturation will, of course, immediately saturate). The transient response of such a design 
will be degraded, but this may not be important. It depends on the application.
Although the partial saturation of the core caused by the staircase-saturation effect may 
not be a major problem under steady-state conditions, severe problems can arise during 
transient loading.
Assume that the power supply has been operating at a relatively light load and that 
steady-state operating conditions have been established. The natural tendency to staircase 
saturation will have resulted in the transformer operating very near a saturated condition 
for one transistor or the other. A sudden increase in output current demand will result in the 
output voltage falling initially, as the inductor current cannot change instantaneously. The 
control circuit will respond to the drop in output voltage by increasing the drive pulse width 
to maximum. The transformer will immediately saturate for one half cycle, with possible 
catastrophic results for the switching device.
Consequently, some other control mechanism, perhaps primary current limit or ampli-
fier slew rate limitation, will need to be brought into action to prevent catastrophic failure. 
Both of these would impose a severe limitation on transient response time. More effective 
methods of dealing with staircase saturation (currentmode control methods) are discussed 
in Part 3, Chap. 10.
12.5 CURRENT-MODE CONTROL 
AND SUBHARMONIC RIPPLE 
A coupling capacitor C
x
is often fitted to prevent a DC path through the transformer 
winding when the supply is linked for 110-V operation. This capacitor is intended 
to prevent  staircase saturation by blocking DC current in the transformer  primary. 
Unfortunately, it can also introduce an undesirable effect, characterized by alternate 
12. HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED CONVERTERS
2.97
cycles being high-voltage, narrow pulse width and low-voltage, wide pulse width as a 
result of the capacitor C
x
developing a DC bias. This unbalanced operation results in 
alternate power cycles being of different amplitude and introduces subharmonic ripple 
into the output voltage. Even when this capacitor C
x
is not fitted, this problem can still 
occur when the input link is removed for 220-V operation, as C2 and C3 now provide 
DC blocking. Special DC restoration techniques must be used if automatic balancing 
is to be provided, or current-mode control is applied to the half-bridge converter. (See 
Part 3, Sec. 10.10.)
12.6 CROSS-CONDUCTION PREVENTION 
Cross conduction can be a major problem in the half-bridge arrangement. Cross conduction 
occurs when both Q1 and Q2 are “on” at the same instant, usually as a result of excessive 
storage time in the “off”-going transistor. This fault applies a short circuit to the supply 
lines, usually with disastrous results.
Two methods are suggested to stop this effect. The simple approach is to apply a fixed 
end stop to the drive pulse width so that the conduction angle can never be wide enough 
to allow cross conduction to take place. The problem with this approach is that the stor-
age time is variable, depending upon transistor type, operating temperature, and loading. 
Consequently, to be safe, a wide margin must be provided, and hence the range of control 
and the utility factor of the transformer, transistors, and diodes will be reduced. (The power 
must be transferred during a relatively narrow conduction period.)
An alternative approach which does not suffer from these limitations is the active “cross-
coupled inhibit” or “overlap protection” circuit. (See Part 1, Chap. 19.) 
In this arrangement, if, say, Q1 is “on” for any reason, then the drive to Q2 is inhibited 
until Q1 comes out of saturation, and conversely for Q2. This automatic inhibit action has 
the advantages of accommodating variations in the storage time and always allowing a full 
conduction angle to be utilized.
12.7 SNUBBER COMPONENTS (HALF-BRIDGE)
Components C3, C4, and R1 are often referred to as snubber components (more correctly load 
line shaping see Part 1, Chap. 18); they assist the turn-off action of the high-voltage transistors 
Q1 and Q2 so as to reduce secondary breakdown stress. As the transistors turn off, the trans-
former inductance maintains a current flow, and the snubber components provide an alternative 
path for this current, preventing excessive voltage stress during the turn-off action.
The conventional diode capacitor snubber circuit should not be used in the half-bridge 
connection, as it provides a low-impedance cross-conduction path during the turn-on 
transients of Q1 and Q2.
12.8 SOFT START
When the converter is first switched on, the drive pulses should be progressively increased 
to allow a slow buildup in output current and voltage. This is known as soft start. If this soft-
start action is not provided, there will be a large inrush current on initial switch-on, with an 
overshoot in output voltage; also, the transformer may saturate as a result of flux doubling 
effects. (See Part 3, Chap. 7.) The soft-start action should always be invoked following a 
shutdown of the converter—for example, after an overvoltage or overload protection shut-
down. (See Part 1, Sec. 9.2.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested