c# pdf reader itextsharp : Best pdf editor delete pages software SDK dll windows wpf azure web forms Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi33-part501

2.98
PART 2
12.9 TRANSFORMER DESIGN
Core Size 
The transformer size will be selected to meet the power requirements and temperature rise 
for the selected operating frequency. This information is available from manufacturers’ 
data, and typical graphs for transmissible power are shown in Figs. 2.2.2 and 3.4.3. 
Example 
Assume that a conservative design is to be made for an operating frequency of 30 kHz and 
a temperature rise of 40°C at 100 W output.
A single output of 5 V, 20 A is to be provided. The efficiency of such a system would be 
of the order of 70% (higher efficiencies will be obtained with modern low loss diodes and 
switching devices), giving a transmissible power of approximately 140 W (assuming that 
the majority of the losses will be in the transformer and output circuitry). From Fig. 2.2.2, 
a suitable choice would be the EC41 (FX3730) or similar.
12.10 OPTIMUM FLUX DENSITY
The choice of optimum flux density B
opt
will be a matter for careful consideration. Unlike 
the flyback converter, with push-pull both quadrants of the B/H loop will be used, and the 
available induction excursion is more than double that of the flyback case. Consequently, 
core losses are to be considered more carefully as these may exceed the copper losses if the 
full induction excursion is used. For the most efficient design, the copper and core losses 
should be approximately equal.
Figure 2.12.2 shows the temperature rise for the 41-mm core plotted against total trans-
former loss. If we assume a permitted temperature rise of 40°C, the permitted power loss 
FIG. 2.12.2 Temperature rise of an FX 3730 transformer as a function of total internal 
dissipation, in free air conditions. (Courtesy of Mullard Ltd.)
Best pdf editor delete pages - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf online; delete a page from a pdf file
Best pdf editor delete pages - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page in a pdf file; add and remove pages from pdf file online
12. HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED CONVERTERS
2.99
in the transformer is 2.6 W (note that the hot-spot temperature is somewhat higher than 
the average overall temperature of the core). Consequently, if this power loss is to be split 
equally between core and winding, then the maximum core loss will be 1.3 W.
From Fig. 2.12.3 it can be seen that at 30 kHz the FX 3730 cores have a loss of 1.3 W 
at a total flux & of approximately 19 μWb. The area of the center pole is 106 mm2, so the 
peak flux density in the center pole will be
ˆ
B
A
cp



&
19
106
180
MWb
mm
mT
2
FIG. 2.12.3 Hysteresis and eddy-current loss in a pair of FX 3730 cores as a function 
of total flux & at 100°C, with frequency as a parameter. (Courtesy of Mullard Ltd.)
Note:
1 T  1 Wb/m2
A second consideration for the selection of peak flux density is the possibility of core 
saturation under transient loading conditions at maximum input voltage.
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and
delete pdf page acrobat; copy pages from pdf to word
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
A best HTML5 PDF viewer control for PDF Document reading on ASP.NET web based application An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages
2.100
PART 2
12.11 TRANSIENT CONDITIONS
When the converter operates under closed-loop conditions, as the input voltage increases, 
the pulse width will normally decrease in the same ratio so as to maintain the output voltage 
constant. Under these conditions, the peak flux density of the core remains constant at the 
designed value, in this case 180 mT. However, under transient conditions, it is possible for 
the pulse width to increase to maximum irrespective of the supply voltage. This can occur 
at maximum input voltage. The transformer was designed to operate at 180 mT at mini-
mum voltage and maximum pulse width. Hence the increase in flux density at maximum 
input voltage will follow the same ratio as the increase in voltage (in this case 50%). In this 
example, the flux density would abruptly increase from 180 mT to 270 mT. From Fig. 2.2.3, 
it will be seen that this is still below the saturation limit; so as long as the transformer is 
made to operate symmetrically about zero flux, the transient loading will not cause satura-
tion of the core, and reliable operation would be expected.
If this calculation shows that the core will saturate, then one of the following changes 
is recommended:
1. Design for a lower flux level. This is safe but results in a lower-efficiency trans-
former, because more turns are required and the optimum fluxing level has not been 
used. 
2.  Provide independent, fast-acting current limits on the two switching transistors. This 
is a preferred solution, since it not only prevents saturation but gives protection against 
other fault conditions. A similar action would be provided by cur-rent-mode control. 
(See Part 3, Chap. 10.) 
3. Have an end stop for maximum pulse width which is proportional to input voltage. This 
is also an acceptable solution but degrades the transient performance. 
12.12 CALCULATING PRIMARY TURNS
Once optimum core size and peak flux density have been selected, the primary turns may 
be calculated. The transformer must provide full output voltage at minimum line input. 
Under these conditions, the power pulse will have its maximum width of 16.5 μs. Hence 
the minimum primary turns are calculated for this condition.
With 90 V rms input to the voltage doubling network, the DC voltage will be approxi-
mately 222 V. (See Part 1, Chap. 6.)
Consider one half cycle of operation. The capacitors C1 and C2 will have a center point 
voltage of half the supply, that is, 111 V. When Q1 turns on, the difference between the 
center point voltage and V
cc
will be applied across the transformer primary. Consequently, 
the primary will see a voltage V
p
of 111 V for a period of 16.5 μs.
The turns required for a peak flux density of 180 mT can be calculated as follows:
N
Vt
BA
mpp
p
cp

on
$
where Vp  primary voltage V
cc
/2, VDC
t
on
 “on” time, μs
          $B  total flux density change during the “on” period, (Note:$B
 2B
ˆ
)
A
cp
 minimum core area, mm2
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application. Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages.
delete page from pdf reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET
delete pages in pdf; delete pages pdf files
12. HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED CONVERTERS
2.101
N
mpp
 minimum primary turns (push-pull operation)
ˆ
 peak flux density (with respect to zero), T 
12.13 CALCULATE MINIMUM PRIMARY TURNS 
With 
V
p
V
cc
/2  111 V
t
on
 16.5 μs
B
opt
 180 mT (optimum flux density at 30 kHz)
$B  2
ˆ
B 0.36 T
A
cp
 106 mm2
Therefore
N
mpp

r
r

111 16 5
036 106
48
.
.
turns
Therefore, the minimum primary turns required in this example would be 48 turns. 
12.14 CALCULATE SECONDARY TURNS
The required output is 5 V. Allowing a voltage drop in the rectifier diode, inductor, and 
transformer winding of 1 V (a typical figure), the transformer secondary voltage will be 
6 V. (This assumes that the maximum pulse width is 50%, giving a near-square-wave out-
put.) Since there are 2.3 V per turn on the primary winding, the secondary turns will be
6
23
26
.
 .
turns
Half turns are not convenient, as they can cause saturation of one leg of the transformer 
unless special techniques are used. (See Part 3, Sec. 4.23.) We have the option of round-
ing up to 3 turns or down to 2 turns. If the turns are rounded downward, it would become 
necessary to reduce the number of primary turns to maintain the correct output voltage, as 
the pulse width cannot be increased beyond 50%. This reduction in turns would result in an 
increase in the flux density of the core, and saturation could occur under transient condi-
tions. Therefore, the choice is made to increase the secondary turns to 3. The primary turns 
and maximum flux density will then remain as before, and the pulse width will be reduced 
to give the correct output voltage. Hence, at minimum input voltage, the pulse width will 
be less than 16.5 μs, and it is now possible to have a fixed end stop on the pulse width and 
provide a “dead band” to prevent cross conduction. (Cross conduction occurs when both 
power transistors are “on” at the same time, presenting a short circuit across the supply lines 
and usually resulting in rapid catastrophic failure. See Part 1, Chap. 19.) 
We now have the basic information for winding the power transformer. The selection of 
wire sizes, shapes, and topology is described in Part 3, Chap. 4.
The design approach outlined here is by no means rigorous and is intended for general 
guidance only. More comprehensive information is available in Part 3, Chaps. 4 and 5, and 
the designer is urged to study these sections and References 1 and 2.
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pdf pages in reader
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
add and remove pages from a pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
2.102
PART 2
12.15 CONTROL AND DRIVE CIRCUITS
The control and drive circuits used for this type of converter are legion. They range from 
fully integrated control circuits, available from a number of manufacturers, to the fully 
discrete designs favored by many power supply engineers. A discussion of suitable drive 
circuits will be found in Part 1, Chaps. 15 and 16. 
For reliable operation, the drive and control circuits must provide the following basic 
functions:
1. Soft start. This reduces inrush current and turn-on stress, and helps to prevent output 
voltage overshoot during the turn-on action. In push-pull applications, it also prevents 
saturation of the transformer core by flux doubling effects. (See Part 3, Chap. 7.) 
2. Flux centering. This circuit differentially controls the pulses supplied to the upper and 
lower transistors in push-pull applications to maintain the mean flux in the core at zero. 
Various methods may be used, and these are discussed in Part 3, Chap. 6. 
3. Cross-conduction inhibit. Cross conduction occurs when both power transistors are 
“on” at the same instant. This can occur even though the drive to each device does not 
exceed 50%, as the storage time in the power devices can cause the power pulses to 
overlap. Fixed end stops or an active cross-conduction limit may be used. (See Part 1, 
Chap. 19.) 
4. Current limiting. Current limiting may be applied to input or output and must maintain 
control down to a short-circuit condition. For switchmode systems, a constant-current 
limit is recommended, since this will prevent lockout with nonlinear loads. (See Part 1, 
Chaps. 13 and 14.) 
5. Overvoltage protection. On higher-current units, it is generally acceptable to provide 
overvoltage protection by converter shutdown, rather than by SCR crowbar techniques. 
(See Part 1, Chap. 11.) 
6. Voltage control and isolation. Stable closed-loop control of the output voltage must be 
maintained for all conditions of operation. Where outputs are to be isolated from inputs, 
a suitable isolation device must be used. These include optical couplers, transformers, 
and magnetic amplifiers.
Note: Where output performance is not critical, it is possible to provide control on the 
primary circuit by using an auxiliary winding on the transformer for both voltage control 
and auxiliary requirements. 
7. Primary overpower limiting. A number of possible failure mechanisms can be 
prevented by providing independent current limits on the primary power transis-
tors. Problems associated with cross conduction and transformer saturation can 
be avoided in this way. It is sometimes a requirement of the specification that a 
short circuit on a transformer secondary not cause catastrophic failure. (See Part 1, 
Chap. 13.) 
8. Input undervoltage protection. The control circuit should recognize the state of the input 
voltage and allow operation only when this is high enough for satisfactory performance. 
Hysteresis should be provided on this guard circuit to prevent squegging at the critical 
turn-on voltage. (See Part 1, Chap. 8.) 
9. Ancillary functions. Electronic inhibit (usually TTL compatible), synchronization, 
power good signals, power-up sequencing, input RFI filtering, inrush current limiting, 
and output filter design are all covered in their various sections. (See Index.) 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
delete pages pdf document; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Markup Drawing Library: add, delete, edit PDF markups in C#
in C# Program. A best PDF annotator control for Visual Studio .NET support to markup PDF with various annotations in C#.NET class.
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete blank page from pdf
12. HALF-BRIDGE PUSH-PULL DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED CONVERTERS
2.103
12.16 FLUX DOUBLING EFFECT
The difference in the operating mode for the single-ended transformer and the push-pull 
balanced transformer is not always fully appreciated.
For the single-ended forward or flyback converter, only one quadrant of the B/H loop is 
used, there is a remnant flux B
r
, and the remaining range of induction is often quite small. 
(Fig. 2.9.2 shows the effect well.)
In the push-pull transformer, it is normally assumed that the full B/H loop may be used 
and that B will be incremented from  B
max
to +B
max
each cycle, so that the total change $B
during an “on” period will be (2 r
ˆ
B). Often this value of 2
ˆ
B is used in the calculation of 
primary turns, resulting in half the number of turns being required on the push-pull trans-
former compared with the single-ended case. Hence
N
V t
BA
mpp
cc on
e

2
ˆ
where N
mpp
 minimum primary turns for push-pull operation
V
cc
 primary DC voltage
t
on
 maximum “on” time, μs 
ˆ
B maximum flux density, mT
T
A
e
 effective core area, mm2
However, the designer should be careful when applying this approach, as 2
ˆ
B may not always 
be valid for $B. For example, consider the condition when the converter is first switched on. 
The core flux density will be sitting between  B
r
and  B
r
(the remanence values). Hence, 
for the first half cycle, a flux change of 2
ˆ
B may take the core into saturation (the so-called 
“flux doubling effect”). Thus the full voltage and pulse width cannot be applied for the first 
few cycles of operation, and a soft-start action is required (that is, the pulse width must 
increase slowly over the first few cycles). Further, if under steady-state conditions staircase-
saturation effects are allowed to take the core toward saturation, the full 2
ˆ
B range may not 
be available in both directions. (This is important when rapid changes in pulse width are 
demanded under transient conditions.) Hence there is a real need for symmetry correction 
in push-pull converters.
For these reasons it is common practice to reduce the range of $B and use more turns 
than the above equation would indicate in order to provide a good working margin for any 
start-up and asymmetry problems. The margin required depends on how well the above 
effects have been controlled.
12.17 PROBLEMS
1. Why is the term “half bridge” used to describe the circuit shown in Fig. 2.12.1a?
2. Describe the operating principle of the half bridge.
3. What is the function of diodes D1 and D2 in the half-bridge circuit shown in Fig. 2.12.1a?
4. In a duty-ratio-controlled half-bridge forward converter with full-wave rectification, 
what prevents core restoration during the period when Q1 and Q2 are both “off”?
5. What is the intended function of the series capacitor C
x
in the primary circuit?
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework C#.NET Demo Code: Highlight Text in Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete a page from a pdf in preview; add remove pages from pdf
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
application. Free online C# source codes provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF forms in C#.NET framework project. A
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete page in pdf preview
2.104
PART 2
6. Why does the series capacitor C
x
in Fig. 2.12.1 often cause subharmonic ripple in half-
bridge applications? 
7. What can be done to reduce the effects of core staircase saturation in the half-bridge circuit? 
8. Why is the problem of staircase saturation more noticeable when power FETs are used? 
9. Describe a method of control which eliminates staircase-saturation problems. 
10. Why is it bad practice to fit a capacitor in series with the primary winding when cur-
rent-mode control is being used? 
11. What is meant by “flux doubling,” and what is its cause? 
12. What is normally done to prevent core flux doubling during the initial turn-on of a 
push-pull converter? 
13. What is meant by “cross conduction” in a half-bridge circuit? 
14. Give two methods commonly used to prevent cross-conduction problems. 
15. Diodes are not used in the snubber circuits applied to the half-bridge circuit. Why is this? 
16. Why is the optimum flux density swing in high-frequency push-pull converters often 
considerably less than the peak core capability?
2.105
BRIDGE CONVERTERS 
13.1 INTRODUCTION 
The full-bridge push-pull converter requires four power transistors and extra drive compo-
nents. This tends to make it more expensive than the flyback or half-bridge converter, and 
so it is normally reserved for higher-power applications.
The technique has a number of useful features; in particular, a single primary winding 
is required on the main transformer, and this is driven to the full supply voltage in both 
directions. This, together with full-wave output rectification, provides an excellent utility 
factor for the transformer core and windings, and highly efficient transformer designs are 
possible.
A second advantage is that the power switches operate under extremely well defined 
conditions. The maximum stress voltage will not exceed the supply line voltage under any 
conditions. Positive clamping by four energy recovery diodes eliminates any voltage tran-
sients that in other circuits would have been generated by the leakage inductances.
To its disadvantage, four switching transistors are required, and since two transistors 
operate in series, the effective saturated “on”-state power loss is somewhat greater than 
in the two-transistor push-pull case. However, in high-voltage off-line switching systems, 
these losses are acceptably small.
Finally, the topology provides flyback energy recovery via the four recovery diodes 
without needing an energy recovery winding.
13.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
13.2.1 General Conditions 
Figure 2.13.1 shows the power section of a typical off-line bridge converter. Diagonal pairs 
of switching devices are operated simultaneously and in alternate sequence. For example, 
Q1 and Q3 would both be “on” at the same time, followed by Q2 and Q4. In a pulse-width-
controlled system, there will be a period when all four devices will be “off.” It should be 
noted that when Q2 and Q4 are “on,” the voltage across the primary winding has been 
reversed from that when Q1 and Q3 were “on.”
In this example, a proportional base drive circuit has been used; this makes the base 
drive current proportional to the collector current at all times. This technique is particularly 
suitable for high-power applications and is more fully described in Part 1, Chap. 16. 
CHAPTER 13 
2.105
FIG. 2.13.1 Full-bridge forward push-pull converter, showing inrush limiting circuit and input filter.
2
.
1
0
6
1
3
.
B
R
I
D
G
E
C
O
N
V
E
R
T
E
R
S
2
.
1
0
7
D
u
r
i
n
g
t
h
e
o
f
f
p
e
r
i
o
d
,
u
n
d
e
r
s
t
e
a
d
y
-
s
t
a
t
e
c
o
n
d
i
t
i
o
n
s
,
a
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
w
i
l
l
h
a
v
e
b
e
e
n
e
s
t
a
b
-
l
i
s
h
e
d
i
n
L
1
,
a
n
d
t
h
e
o
u
t
p
u
t
r
e
c
t
i
f
i
e
r
d
i
o
d
e
s
D
5
a
n
d
D
6
w
i
l
l
b
e
a
c
t
i
n
g
a
s
f
l
y
w
h
e
e
l
d
i
o
d
e
s
.
U
n
d
e
r
t
h
e
f
o
r
c
i
n
g
a
c
t
i
o
n
o
f
L
1
,
b
o
t
h
d
i
o
d
e
s
c
o
n
d
u
c
t
a
n
e
q
u
a
l
s
h
a
r
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
u
c
t
o
r
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
d
u
r
i
n
g
t
h
i
s
o
f
f
p
e
r
i
o
d
(
e
x
c
e
p
t
f
o
r
a
s
m
a
l
l
t
r
a
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
m
a
g
n
e
t
i
z
i
n
g
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
)
.
P
r
o
v
i
d
e
d
t
h
a
t
b
a
l
a
n
c
e
d
d
i
o
d
e
s
a
r
e
u
s
e
d
,
t
h
e
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
a
c
r
o
s
s
t
h
e
s
e
c
o
n
d
a
r
y
w
i
n
d
i
n
g
s
w
i
l
l
b
e
z
e
r
o
,
a
n
d
h
e
n
c
e
t
h
e
p
r
i
m
a
r
y
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
w
i
l
l
a
l
s
o
b
e
z
e
r
o
(
a
f
t
e
r
a
s
h
o
r
t
p
e
r
i
o
d
o
f
d
a
m
p
e
d
o
s
c
i
l
-
l
a
t
o
r
y
c
o
n
d
i
t
i
o
n
s
c
a
u
s
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
p
r
i
m
a
r
y
l
e
a
k
a
g
e
i
n
d
u
c
t
a
n
c
e
)
.
T
y
p
i
c
a
l
c
o
l
l
e
c
t
o
r
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
w
a
v
e
f
o
r
m
s
a
r
e
s
h
o
w
n
i
n
F
i
g
.
2
.
1
3
.
2
.
F
I
G
.
2
.
1
3
.
2
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
a
n
d
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
w
a
v
e
f
o
r
m
s
f
o
r
f
u
l
l
-
b
r
i
d
g
e
c
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
r
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested