c# pdf reader itextsharp : Cut pages from pdf file SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi35-part503

2.118
PART 2
such as auxiliary supplies for the control circuits of a large converter. (In this example, an 
output of 12 V, 150 mA is developed.)
When first switched on, current flowing in R1 initiates the turn-on of Q1. As Q1 turns 
on, positive regenerative feedback is developed by drive winding P2 and applied to Q1 via 
C1 and D1 so that Q1 turns on rapidly. The current in the collector, and hence the emit-
ter, of Q1 will now ramp up linearly at a rate defined by the primary inductance and the 
applied voltage.
As the emitter current increases, the voltage across the emitter resistor R2 (V
ec
)
will also increase until it approaches the value generated by the feedback winding P2. 
At this point, the base current to Q1 will be “pinched off,” and Q1 will start to turn 
off. By normal flyback action, the voltages on all windings will now reverse, and 
regenerative turn-off will be applied to the base of Q1 by the drive winding P2 and 
capacitor C1.
This “off” state will now continue until all the energy that was stored in the transformer 
during the “on” period is transferred to the output circuit. At this point, the voltage across 
all windings will begin to fall toward zero. Now, as a result of the charge that has been 
developed across C1 by the current in R1, as the drive winding P2 returns to zero, the 
base of Q1 will, once again, be taken positive, and Q1 will be turned on again to repeat 
the cycle.
The frequency of operation is controlled by the primary inductance, the value of R2, the 
reflected load current and voltage, and the selected feedback voltage on P2.
To minimize the frequency change resulting from load variations and to maintain the 
flyback voltage constant, the turn-off time must be maintained nearly constant. This is 
achieved by storing sufficient energy during the “on” period to keep the energy recovery 
diode D2 in conduction during the complete flyback period. By this means the flyback 
voltage, and thus the output voltage, are maintained constant. This requires that the 
flyback energy considerably exceed the load requirements, so that the spare energy 
will be returned to the supply line during the complete flyback period, maintaining D2 
in conduction. The transformer inductance will be selected to obtain this condition by 
adjusting the core gap size. In low-power, constant-load applications, a zener diode D3 
in the supply line will stabilize the supply voltage and ensure a fixed frequency and a 
stabilized output voltage.
FIG. 2.14.1 Primary voltage-regulated self-oscillating flyback converter for low-power auxiliary 
supplies.
Cut pages from pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages from pdf in preview
Cut pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf file online; delete page pdf file
14. LOW-POWER SELF-OSCILLATING AUXILIARY CONVERTERS
2.119
14.4 TRANSFORMER DESIGN
14.4.1 Step 1, Select Core Size 
The transformer size may be selected to meet the transmitted power requirement. (See 
Fig. 2.2.2.) But more often, for very low power applications, a practical size will be selected 
that will give a reasonable number of primary turns and wire gauge. Further, the core must 
be large enough to meet any isolation or creepage distance requirements if primary-to-
secondary isolation is required.
Example
In the following example, the output power is only 3 W, and the core will be chosen for 
practical winding considerations rather than for the temperature rise. A core size EF16 in 
Siemens N27 material will be considered.
14.4.2 Step 2, Calculate Primary Turns 
Assume the following specifications: 
Frequency
30 kHz (1
-
2
period t
on
16.5 μs) 
Core area A
e
20.1 mm2
Supply voltage V
cc
100 V
Flux density swing $B
250 mT
N
V t
BA
p
cc
e


r
r
r
r
r
on
$
100 16 6 10
250 10
20 1 10
6
3
.
.

6
330 turns
The flyback voltage will be equal to the forward voltage, as bifilar windings of equal turns 
are used in this example.
14.4.3 Step 3, Calculate Feedback and Secondary Turns
The feedback winding should be selected to generate approximately 3 V to ensure an ade-
quate feedback factor for fast switching action of Q1.
N
NV
V
fb
p fb
cc


r

330 3
100
9.9
(
)
turns use 10 turns
The output voltage is to be 12 V, and allowing 0.6 V for diode losses, the secondary voltage 
will be 12.6 V.
Hence
N
NV
V
s
p s
cc


r

330 12 6
100
42
.
turns
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
cut pages out of pdf online; delete page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide. Help to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a new PDF file.
copy page from pdf; delete pages pdf preview
2.120
PART 2
14.4.4 Step 4, Calculate Primary Current 
The output power is 3 W; therefore, assuming 70% efficiency, the input power will be 4.3 W.
Hence the mean input current at V
cc
 100 V will be
I
P
V
m
cc



43
100
43
.
mA
For a complete energy transfer system, the primary current will be triangular, and the peak 
current can be calculated. The flyback voltage is the same as the forward voltage, so the 
“on” and “off” periods will also be equal. (See Fig. 2.14.2.)
From Fig. 2.14.2, 
I
I
peak
mean
mA


4
172
FIG. 2.14.2 Primary current waveform for self-oscillating auxiliary converter.
The actual collector current should exceed this calculated mean current by at least 50% to 
ensure that D2 will be maintained in conduction during the complete flyback period. This 
defines the flyback voltage and gives a smart switching action. High efficiency will still 
be maintained, as the spare flyback energy will be recovered by energy recovery diode D2 
and returned to the supply. Hence, in this example, the primary current will be increased by 
50%, requiring a lower inductance:
I
I
P


15
258
.
peak
mA
14.4.5 Step 5, Establish Core Gap (Empirical Method) 
Place a temporary gap of 0.010 in in the transformer core. Connect the transformer into 
the circuit, and operate the unit with a dummy load at the required power. Adjust the trans-
former gap for the required period (collector current slope and transmitted power). Note:
$
$
i
t
c


258
16 5
15 5
.
. mA/M s
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, in C# demo code below, we will explain how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
delete blank pages from pdf file; add or remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, below example explains how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
14. LOW-POWER SELF-OSCILLATING AUXILIARY CONVERTERS
2.121
Resistor R1 is selected to give reliable starting and resistor R3 to give the required base 
drive current. These values depend upon the gain of Q1; those shown in Fig. 2.14.1 are 
typical for a small 5-W unit.
R2 must be selected to pinch off the drive when the collector current reaches 253 mA, 
(At this point the base current will have dropped to zero.) Hence 
R2
3 0 6
258 10
93
3


r

V
V
I
fb
be
p
.
. 7
Finally, R2 may be adjusted to give the required operating frequency.
14.4.6 Establish Core Gap (by Calculation and Published Data) 
From Fig. 2.14.2, the required inductance may be calculated from the slope of the current 
and the value of the applied voltage, as follows:
L
V
t
I
p
cc
P


r

$
$
100 16 5
258
64
.
. mH
The required A
L
factor (nH/turn2) may now be calculated:
A
L
n
L


r

2
2
2
64 10
330
59
.
nH/turn
From Fig. 2.14.3 (the published data for the E16 core) the required gap is obtained by enter-
ing the figure with A
L
 59 nH
A gap of 0.6 mm (0.024 in) is indicated.
FIG. 2.14.3 A
L
factor as a function of core gap 
size for E16 size N27 ferrite cores. (Courtesy
of Siemens AG.)
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific location of current PDF file.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages pdf online
This page intentionally left blank 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
delete page from pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf
2.123
SINGLE-TRANSFORMER 
TWO-TRANSISTOR 
SELF-OSCILLATING 
CONVERTERS 
15.1 INTRODUCTION
Figure 2.15.1 shows the circuit of a very basic current-gain-limited two-transistor saturat-
ing transformer converter. This is sometimes referred to as a DC transformer. In this type 
of converter, the main transformer is driven to saturation, giving a large core loss; hence 
the transformer is not very efficient. Also, the maximum collector current in the switch-
ing transistors is gain-dependent and not well specified. Hence, this type of converter is 
most suitable for low-power applications, typically from 1 to 25 W.
Because of the full-conduction square-wave push-pull operation, the rectified output 
is nearly DC, and hence the topology is capable of much higher secondary currents 
than the flyback converter considered in Chap. 14. The primary transistors see a voltage 
stress of at least twice the supply voltage, so the circuit is preferred for lower-input-
voltage applications.
The major advantages are simplicity, low cost, and small size. Where the performance 
is acceptable, these simple converters provide very cost-effective solutions to smaller 
auxiliary power needs.
15.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES (GAIN-LIMITED 
SWITCHING)
The circuit shown in Fig. 2.15.1 operates as follows.
On initial switch-on, a start-up current flows in R1 to the bases of Q1 and Q2. This will 
initiate a turn-on action on the transistor with the lowest V
be
or highest gain; assume Q1 in 
this example.
As Q1 turns on, the finish of all windings goes negative (starts positive), and posi-
tive regenerative feedback from drive winding P2 will take the base of Q1 more positive 
and the base of Q2 more negative. Hence, Q1 will switch rapidly into a fully saturated 
“on” state.
CHAPTER 15
2.123
2.124
PART 2
The supply voltage V
cc
is now applied across the left-hand side main primary winding 
P1, and magnetization current plus any reflected load current will flow in the collec-
tor of Q1.
During the “on” period, the flux density in the core will increase toward saturation—say, 
point S1 in Fig. 2.15.2a. After a period defined by the core size, saturation flux value, and 
number of primary turns, the core will reach its saturated state.
At S1, H is increasing rapidly, giving a large increase in collector current. This con-
tinues until a gain limitation in Q1 prevents any further collector current increase. At this 
point the magnetizing field H will not be further increased, and the required rate of change 
of B (dB/dt) will not be sustained. As a result, the voltage across the primary winding must 
collapse, and the voltage on the collector of Q1 will rise toward the supply voltage.
As the voltage across the primary falls, the base drive voltage on P2 will also collapse, 
and Q1 will turn off.
FIG.  2.15.1 Low-voltage, saturating-core, single-transformer, push-pull self-oscillating 
converter (DC transformer).
FIG. 2.15.2 Typical B/H loops for ferrite cores with B
r
/B
s
ratios (squareness ratios) of (a) less than 70% 
and(b) greater than 85%.
15. THE DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FLYBACK CONVERTER
2.125
Because of the finite slope at the top of the BH characteristic (the post-saturation perme-
ability), there will be a flyback action in the transformer from S1 to S2, and since dB/dt is 
now negative, the voltages on all windings will reverse. This will further turn Q1 off and 
start to turn Q2 on.
By regenerative action, Q2 will now be turned on and Q1 off, and the process will repeat 
on the second half of the primary winding. The flux in the core will now change from S2 
toward S3, where the turn-off action will be repeated.
Note: The start of the turn-off action was initiated by transistor gain-current limiting. This 
limiting action is not well defined, as the collector current will vary with device type and 
temperature. With high-gain transistors, a very large collector current would flow before 
the transistor would become gain-limited. This results in poor switching efficiency and 
increased EMI problems. Further, the ill-defined collector current may even result in failure 
of the switching device under some conditions if it has not been carefully selected for the 
correct (low) current gain and rating.
15.3 DEFINING THE SWITCHING CURRENT
Figure 2.15.3 shows a more satisfactory method of limiting the termination current. Emitter 
resistor R1 or R2 develops an increasing voltage drop as the primary current rises. The volt-
age on the transistor base will track this voltage, and when it reaches the clamp value of 
the zener diode D1 or D2, the base drive current will be “pinched off,” and turn-off action 
will commence.
In this circuit, the peak collector current is defined by the choice of emitter resistors and 
clamp zener voltage, and turn-off termination current no longer depends upon the gain of 
the transistors.
The full action of Fig. 2.15.3 is as follows. On switch-on, current flows through R4 and 
starts to turn on, say, Q1. Positive regenerative feedback from P2 will assist the turn-on 
action, and Q1 will saturate into a fully “on” state.
FIG. 2.15.3 Single-transformer, nonsaturating, push-pull self-oscillating converter with primary 
current limiting.
A drive current loop is now set up from P2 through R3, Q1 base-emitter, and R1, return-
ing via D2, which acts as a diode in the forward direction. The drive current value is large 
so that the transistors are fully saturated throughout the “on” period.
2.126
PART 2
With Q1 “on,” the current in the collector will increase with time, as defined by the 
primary inductance, the reflected secondary inductance L1, and the load.
As the current increases, the voltage across R1 and hence on the base of Q1 will also 
increase until zener diode D1 is brought into conduction.
The value of R1 is chosen so that drive pinch-off occurs at a controlled maximum col-
lector current, which will be just into core saturation at, say, point S1’ on Fig. 2.15.2b. Since 
at the clamp current H cannot be incremented further, the voltages across all windings must 
fall toward zero, and only a very small flyback action is required to finally turn Q1 off and 
Q2 on. The cycle of operations will continue for Q2. The collector termination current no 
longer depends on the gain of the transistors.
Collector diodes D5 and D6 provide a path for reverse current when the reflected load 
current is lower than the magnetization current. These diodes operate in a cross-connected 
fashion; for example, when Q1 turns off, magnetization current will cause the collector of 
Q1 to fly positive. At the same time, the collector of Q2 will fly negative until D6 conducts. 
D6 now provides clamping action for Q1 at a collector voltage of twice V
cc
. To reduce the 
effects of leakage inductance, P1 and P3 would be bifilar-wound.
To reduce RF1 and secondary breakdown stress, snubber networks may be required in 
addition to D5 and D6.
To ensure good switching action, with sufficient regenerative feedback, the drive volt-
age from P2 should be at least 4 V in the circuit shown.
15.4 CHOOSING CORE MATERIALS
The  efficiency  and  performance  of  these  saturating  single-transformer converters 
is critically dependent upon the choice of transformer material. For high-frequency 
operation, low-loss square-loop  ferrite materials are usually  chosen. Square-loop, 
tape-wound toroids may also be used, but these tend to be somewhat expensive at the 
higher frequencies, as very thin laminated tape core material must be used to reduce 
losses. Some of the amorphous square-loop materials show excellent properties for 
this application.
With some square-loop materials, the postsaturation permeability (the slope of the 
B/H characteristic in the saturation region) will be very low (B
r
is high). This is shown 
for the H5B2 material in Fig. 2.15.4b. Hence, the change in flux density between S1 and 
S2 is very small, and the flyback action at turn-off is weak. This gives a lazy switching 
action during the changeover phase. A more energetic switching action will be found 
with the H7A or similar core materials, as shown in Fig. 2.15.4a, but the core losses will 
often be higher with such materials, since they have a low B
r
(remanence) value. With 
toroidal cores it would seem that the designer must make a compromise choice between 
a very square loop low-loss core (giving low core loss but lazy switching) or a lower-
permeability, higher-loss core, which will give good switching but higher magnetizing 
currents (lower inductance) and larger losses. With other core topologies, the problem 
can be solved by introducing an air gap. This gives energetic switching without increas-
ing core loss. Suitable square-loop metal tape-wound materials include square Permalloy, 
Mumetal, and the various HCR materials. Some of the less square amorphous materials 
can also be used. Choose square-loop materials with care, as some are so square they 
will not oscillate, because the flyback action is too weak. (B
r
/B
s
ratios should be less 
than 80%.)
For high-frequency applications, the square-loop ferrites are preferred. Suitable types 
include Fair-Rite #83, Siemens T26, N27, Philips 3C8, TDK H7C1, H5B2, H7A, and 
many more.
FIG. 2.15.4 (a) Magnetization curves for TDK H7A ferrite at 20, 40, and 80°C. This material shows a low residual flux density and low 
loss, making it more suitable for self-oscillating converter applications. (b) Magnetization curves for TDK H5B2 square-loop ferrite material. 
(Courtesy of TDK Ltd.)
2
.
1
2
7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested