c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete page on pdf reader Library software class asp.net winforms windows ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi36-part504

2.128
PART 2
15.5 TRANSFORMER DESIGN (SATURATING-
CORE-TYPE CONVERTERS) 
In the following design example, a square-loop ferrite toroid in TDK H7A material will 
be used (see Fig. 2.15.4a). This material has excellent properties for this application, as 
the hysteresis losses and remanence flux are both low. Hence, this core gives low loss and 
energetic flyback action, resulting in good switching performance. A low-loss material is 
required, as the core will be operated from saturation in one direction to saturation in the 
reverse direction at 50 kHz. Since the complete hysteresis loop will be used, the core losses 
will be maximum.
15.5.1 Step 1, Select Core Size
For low-power converters of this type (5 to 25 W), the core size is often larger than the 
power needs alone would indicate, as the size is chosen for winding convenience to meet 
approvals requirements rather than for power considerations. Further, because the core loss 
is thus intrinsically large, the copper losses must be small if an excessive temperature rise is 
to be avoided. It has been found that if a wire current density of approximately 150 A/cm2
is used, and a toroidal core is chosen that will just allow a single-layer primary winding, 
then the core size will be adequate for the power requirements. This design approach will 
be used in the following example.
Consider a design to meet the following requirements: 
Output power
10 W
Input voltage
48 V DC
Operating frequency
50 kHz
Output voltage
12 V
Output current
830 mA
15.5.2 Step 2, Calculate Input Power and Current
The output power is 10 W. Assume efficiency H  70%; then the input power will be
P
P
in
out
W

r

r

100 10 100
70
14 3
H
.
With full-wave rectification at the output and square-wave operation, the input current will 
be almost a continuous DC and may be calculated as follows:
I
P
V
in
in
in
A



14 3
48
03
.
.
15.5.3 Step 3, Select Wire Gauge
At 150 A/cm2, from Table 3.1.1, a 24 gauge wire is required for 0.3 A. Hence, the wire 
diameter is 0.057 cm.
Delete page on pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages in pdf online
Delete page on pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf preview; delete a page in a pdf file
15. THE DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FLYBACK CONVERTER
2.129
Note:Two wires will be used for the bifilar primary winding, taking up a space of 0.114 cm 
per bifilar turn.
15.5.4 Step 4, Calculate Primary Turns
In this type of self-oscillating converter, the duration of the “on” period, and hence the 
frequency, is set by core saturation. Since this is a push-pull circuit, the total flux density 
change IB from B to  B must occur for each half cycle. From Fig. 2.15.4a, for the H7A 
material at 80°C, the saturation flux density is 3500 G. The swing will be 2 r 3500  
7000 G (700 mT).
A core size is now required that will just allow a single-layer bifilar winding of 24 AWG 
wires. However, there are two variables to be resolved to obtain the core size:
1. The primary turns required to saturate the core at 48 V in the 10-μs (50-kHz) half period 
(which is inversely proportional to the core area).
2. The number of turns of bifilar 24 AWG that can be wound on the core in a single layer 
(which is proportional to the circumference of the center hole; see Fig. 2.15.5).
FIG. 2.15.5 Effective inner circumference of toroid with 
single-layer winding.
The relationship between center hole circumference and core area is not known in this 
example and will be different for various core designs, so a graphical solution will be used. 
The graph is developed as follows.
Consider Table 2.15.1. It will be assumed that a suitable core will be found in the range 
from T6-12–3 through T14.5–20–7.5.
The area of each core is given in the table, so the turns required for saturation of each 
core at the operating frequency and applied voltage may be calculated as follows:
N
V t
BA
p
cc
s e

on
$
where N
p
 number of primary turns
V
cc
 supply voltage, V
t
on
 “on” time (
1
/
2
cycle), μs 
$B
s
 flux density change, T (from  B
sat
to  B
sat
)
A
e
 effective core area, mm2
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete a page from a pdf online; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages pdf document; delete page pdf
2.130
PART 2
TABLE 2.15.1 Toroidal Core Dimensions 
A
B
C
Core
factor 
I
c
/A
e
,
cm 1
Effec-
tive 
length
I
e
, cm
Effective 
area A
e
cm2
Effective 
volume V
c
,
cm3
weight
g
mm
mm
Core type
Dimensions
inch
inch
T2-4-1
4.0 ± 0.2
2.0 ± 0.2
1.0 ± 0.15
90.6
0.871
9.61 r 10–3
8.37r 10 r–3
0.045
0.157
0.079
0.039
T3-6-1.5
6.0 ± 0.3
3.0 ± 0.25
1.5 ± 0.2
60.4
1.31
21.6 r 10–3
28.3 r 10–3
0.15
0.236
0.118
0.059
T4-8-2
8.0 ± 0.3
4.0 ± 0.25
2.0 ± 0.2
45.3
1.74
38.4 r 10–3
67.0 r 10–3
0.36
0.315
0.157
0.079
T5-10-2.5
10.0 ± 0.4
5.0 ± 0.3
2.5 ± 0.25
36.3
2.18
60.1 r 10 3
0.131
0.71
0.394
0.197
0.098
T6-12-3
12.0 ± 0.4
6.0 ± 0.3
3.0 ± 0.25
30.2
2.61
86.5 r 10–3
0.226
1.2
0.472
0.236
0.118
T7-14-3.5
14.0 ± 0.4
7.0 ± 0.3
3.5 ± 0.25
25.9
3.05
0.118
0.359
1.9
0.551
0.276
0.138
T8-16-4
16.0 ± 0.4
8.0 ± 0.3
4.0 ± 0.3
22.7
3.48
0.154
0.536
2.9
0.630
0.315
0.157
T9-18-4.5
18.0 ± 0.4
9.0 ± 0.3
4.5 ± 0.3
20.1
3.92
0.195
0.763
4.1
0.709
0.354
0.177
T10-20-5
20.0 ± 0.4
10.0 ± 0.3
5.0 ± 0.3
18.1
4.36
0.240
1.05
5.7
0.787
0.394
0.197
T14.5-20-7.5
20.0 ± 0.4
14.5 ± 0.4
7.5 ± 0.3
26.1
5.33
0.204
1.09
5.4
0.787
0.571
0.295
T16-28-13
28.0 ± 0.4
16.0 ± 0.4
13.0 ± 0.3
8.64
6.56
0.760
4.99
26
1.10
0.630
0.512
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
cut pages from pdf; delete blank pages in pdf files
15. THE DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FLYBACK CONVERTER
2.131
The turns required to saturate each core in the range T6-12–3 through T14.5-20–7.5 are 
calculated as shown above and entered in Table 2.15.2.
TABLE 2.15.2 Windings for Ferrite Toroidal Cores
Core type
Diameter of 
center hole D,
mm
Cross-
sectional area 
of core, 
mm2
Maximum
turns for a 
single-layer
winding of 24 
AWG N
p
turns
Minimum
turns for core 
saturation at 
50 kHz 
N
p
turns
T6-12-3
6
8.6
15
79
T7-14-3.5
7
11.8
18
58
T8-16-4
8
15.4
22
44
T9-18-4.5
9
19.5
25
35
T10-20-5
10
24.0
28
28.5
T14-5-20-7.5
14.5
20.4
42
33
The size of the center hole is given in Table 2.15.1, and the number of turns that will fit 
each core in a single layer, as shown in Fig. 2.15.5, can be calculated as follows.
Consider the toroid center hole with closely packed windings. Figure 2.15.5 shows that 
the diameter of the center hole is related to the number of turns (assuming that the turns 
are large and the wire diameter is small compared with the center hole diameter) by the 
following formula:
N
D d
d
w
w
w

P
(
)
where D  diameter of center hole, mm
d
w
 wire diameter, mm
N
w
 number of primary wires (that will just fit on the core in a single layer)
Note: The primary is to be wound as a bifilar winding, and primary “turns” N
p
refers to a 
pair of wires that will be split finally to form each side of the center-tapped primary. Hence, 
each turn consists of two wires in parallel, so N
p
N
w
/2.
The number of bifilar turns N
p
that will just fit on each core in a single layer for the range 
T6-12–3 through T14.5-20–7.5 is calculated and also entered in Table 2.15.2.
A graph is now drawn (Fig. 2.15.6) of turns required for saturation at 50 kHz against 
core area (plot A) and maximum bifilar turns that will just fit on the core in a single layer 
against core area (plot B). The intersection of these two lines gives optimum core area, from 
which the core size can be established.
It will be seen that the ideal area is between cores T10 and T14, and so the nearest larger 
core T10-20–5 is chosen. The core area is entered on the graph (horizontal dotted lines). 
A vertical line from the intersection of the core area and the ‘A’ line gives the number of 
primary turns required to saturate the core (28 in this example), and the intersection of the 
core area and the B line shows that 29 turns of 24 AWG can be fitted in a single layer on 
this core.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete page in pdf preview; delete pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages of pdf reader
2.132
PART 2
Clearly, the matching point will vary with different core topologies and wire sizes, and 
although a larger core can always be used, because core saturation occurs, the total power 
loss will increase (and efficiency fall) with the larger core.
For this example, the T10-20–5 is chosen and a primary winding P1, P3 of 28 turns is 
used. Two 24-gauge wires will be wound together to form a bifilar winding.
The volts per turn are
T
V
N
pv
cc
p



48
28
1. 71turns/V
Selecting a feedback voltage of approximately 5 V provides adequate regenerative feed-
back, resulting in fast switching action. In this example, 3 turns would be used for the feed-
back winding P2. The secondary winding will be designed for the required output voltage 
by normal transformer action; in this case 8 turns are used.
The value of the transistor base feed resistor R3 will be selected in accordance with the 
maximum collector current and transistor gain. The emitter resistors R1 and R2 are chosen 
to ensure that transistor drive pinch-off will not occur under normal full-load conditions, 
but will occur before excessive collector current flows. A current margin of about 30% 
above full load is a good compromise. Remember, the emitter current is the sum of the 
transformed load current, the magnetization current, and the base drive current. In this 
example a value of 2.2 7 is used.
Cross conduction (that is, conduction caused by both power transistors being “on” at 
the same time) is eliminated in this circuit arrangement, as it is the turnoff action of one 
transistor that initiates the turn-on action of the second. Consequently, variations in storage 
FIG. 2.15.6 Graphical method for finding optimum toroidal core size for a single-layer winding.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected annotations. guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer &
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete pages in pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
15. THE DIAGONAL HALF-BRIDGE FLYBACK CONVERTER
2.133
time are automatically accommodated without the possibility of cross conduction. This is 
a useful feature of the self-oscillating converter.
The frequency of this type of simple self-oscillating converter will change with input 
voltage, core temperature (because of the change in saturated flux level at high tempera-
tures), and load. Increasing the load results in a voltage drop in the transformer resistance 
and transistors, so that the effective transformer primary voltage is lower; hence the fre-
quency will fall with increasing load.
15.6 PROBLEMS
1. Explain the major advantages of the self-oscillating converter. 
2. Give a typical application for a small self-oscillating converter. 
3. Why is the frequency stability of the self-oscillating converter rather poor?
4. Why does the single-transformer self-oscillating converter tend to be limited to low-
power applications? 
5. Explain why ungapped very square loop magnetic materials (such as square amorphous 
material) are considered unsuitable for self-oscillating single-transformer converters. 
This page intentionally left blank 
2.135
TWO-TRANSFORMER 
SELF-OSCILLATING 
CONVERTERS
16.1 INTRODUCTION
In the two-transformer self-oscillating converter, the switching action is controlled by satu-
ration of a small drive transformer rather than the main power transformer, resulting in 
improved performance and better power transformer efficiency.
As the main power transformer is no longer driven to saturation, more optimum 
transformer design is possible, and the shape of the B/H loop is not so critical. Further, 
better transistor switching action is obtained, because the collector termination current 
is lower and the power transistors turn off under more controlled conditions. The switch-
ing frequency is also more constant, as the drive transformer is not loaded by the output 
and the voltage across the drive transformer is not a direct function of the input voltage. 
Hence, the operating frequency is less sensitive to supply and load changes.
With all these advantages over the simple saturating converter, the two-transformer 
converter is preferred in many higher-power applications. It is often used for low-cost DC 
transformers, (See Chap. 17.)
There  are  two  major  disadvantages  of  the  simple  self-oscillating  two-transformer 
square-wave converter that tend to limit its applications:
1. Soft start is difficult to provide because the pulse width cannot be easily reduced during 
the initial turn-on action. 
2. Outputs are unregulated because of the square-wave (100% duty ratio) output. 
16.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
A basic two-transformer circuit is shown in Fig. 2.16.1. This operates as follows.
At switch-on, a current flows in R1 to initiate turn-on of one of the two drive transistors, 
say Q1. (It depends on the two devices’ gains and their individual emitter-base voltages.) 
As Q1 turns on, regenerative feedback is provided by proportional current drive from a 
separate drive transformer T2. The primary T2P1 couples with the collector current of Q1 
to provide the base drive to Q1 via the secondary winding T2S1. The phasing of the wind-
ings is such that an increase in current in the collector of Q1 will cause an increase in base 
CHAPTER 16
2.135
2.136
PART 2
current in Q1. Since T2 is a current transformer, the base drive current is defined by the 
collector current and the turns ratios of T2. (A ratio of 1/5, for a forced beta of 5, is used 
in this example.)
FIG. 2.16.1 Two-transformer self-oscillating converter.
With Q1 in its “on” state, the voltage V
s
across the secondary of the drive transformer 
T2S1 will be the base-emitter drop of Q1 plus the diode drop of D1 (approximately 1.3 V 
total). The voltage across the drive winding to Q2, T2S2, will be the same value, but in the 
opposite direction, taking the base of Q2 0.7 V negative.
After a period of time defined by the core area and secondary voltage V
s
, the drive trans-
former T2 will saturate, the drive voltage to Q1 will fall to zero, and Q1 will then turn off. 
This is arranged to happen before the main transformer T1 saturates.
With Q1 off, the collector current will fall to zero, and the voltages on T2 will reverse 
by flyback action. Q2 will be brought into conduction, and Q1 will turn hard off. The 
same cycle of operations will now occur on transistor Q2, with the collector current for Q2 
flowing in the second half of the drive transformer T2P2 and the main transformer T1P2, 
reversing the phase.
Since the forward voltages of the base-emitter junction of Q1 and D1, or Q2 and D1 
define the voltage across the secondary of T2, the timing voltage for T2 is fixed and inde-
pendent of the supply voltage. Consequently, the operating frequency is largely indepen-
dent of supply and load changes. However, changes in temperature will affect both diode 
and base voltages and the saturation flux density of the drive transformer T2. Hence, the 
frequency is still sensitive to temperature changes. In many applications, small changes in 
frequency are not important.
Clamp diodes D2 and D3 are fitted across the collector-emitter junctions of the switch-
ing transistors to provide a path for the reverse magnetization current, which would oth-
erwise flow from base to collector in Q1 and Q2 during turn-on, when the reflected load 
current is less than the magnetization current. Although this will occur only under very 
light loading conditions, with proportional drive it can cause problems and warrants further 
examination. 
Consider the conditions immediately before the turn-off of Q1: A transformer magne-
tization current will have been established in the primary of the power transformer T1P1 
and the collector of Q1, flowing from right to left in the winding. When Q1 turns off, this 
magnetization current will try to continue in the same direction in the winding, taking the 
collector of Q1 positive and the collector of Q2 negative (flyback action).
16. TWO-TRANSFORMER SELF-OSCILLATING CONVERTERS
2.137
Since the magnetization current cannot instantly drop to zero, and with Q1 off cannot 
flow in the collector of Q1, it will commutate from the collector of Q1 to the collector of 
Q2, to flow from right to left in T1P2 from the clamp diode D3. If D3 were not fitted, the 
current would flow in the base-collector junction of Q2, and since it is now flowing in 
the reverse direction to the normal collector current, it diverts the base drive current away 
from the base-emitter junction into the base-collector junction. (The transistor is reverse-
biased.)
This reverse collector current would also flow in the primary of the drive transformer 
T2P2, but in the reverse direction to that required for positive feedback. This reverse cur-
rent would prevent or at least delay the turn-on of Q2 and is very undesirable. However, 
by providing a low-resistance alternative path through the clamp diode D3, the majority of 
this undesirable current is diverted away from Q1. In some cases a further series blocking 
diode will be required in the collectors of Q1 and Q2.
In any event, until the magnetization current has fallen to less than the reflected load 
current under light loading conditions, there will not be a forward collector current or a 
regenerative base drive action. If this light loading condition is to be a normal mode of 
operation, an extra voltage-controlled drive winding will be required to maintain the drive 
until normal forward current is established. This extra winding T2P3 and T1S2 is shown as 
a dashed-line detail in Fig. 2.16.1.
If the load current always exceeds the magnetization current, then this refinement is 
not necessary, and diodes D2 and D3 are redundant (except as small snubber components 
if required).
Once again, in this topology, cross conduction is eliminated, since it is the turn-off 
action of one transistor that initiates the turn-on action of its partner. It is interesting to note 
that staircase saturation of T1 cannot occur because the drive transformer T2 equates T1’s 
forward and reverse volt-seconds in the longer term. Even variations in the storage times of 
the two transistors will be accommodated.
If a drive core with a square B/H loop and a high remanence is used, “flux doubling” 
on initial switch-on is eliminated. Both cores retain a magnetic “memory” of the previous 
direction of operation. When the system is turned off, the residual flux remains in the drive 
core as a “memory” of the last operating pulse direction. If, on the next switch-on, the 
first half cycle of operation is in the same direction, then the drive core will saturate more 
rapidly, and this pulse will be shortened; hence saturation of the main transformer will not 
occur. For this reason the residual flux level B
r
of the drive transformer material should be 
higher than that of the main transformer.
With this good control of the state of the flux density in the main core, the working flux 
excursion of the main transformer can be selected with confidence, for optimum efficiency.
It can be seen from the preceding discussion that although the self-oscillating circuits 
appear to be simple, they operate in a fairly sophisticated manner, providing very efficient 
converter action if correctly designed. It is this type of converter (or DC transformer, as it is 
known) that is used in tandem with the primary series buck switching regulator (Chap. 18) 
to provide extremely cost effective multiple-output supplies.
To its disadvantage, two transformers are required for this type of converter. However, 
the drive transformer T2 is very small, as it delivers little power.
16.3 SATURATED DRIVE TRANSFORMER DESIGN
The drive transformer T2 is essentially a saturating current transformer.
Having decided on the operating power, select the power transistors and operating cur-
rent. From the transistor data, find the forced beta required to ensure good saturation and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested