c# pdf reader itextsharp : Cut pages out of pdf application SDK utility azure wpf html visual studio Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi37-part505

2.138
PART 2
switching action. (Assume that a forced beta of 5:1 is chosen in this example; the actual 
value depends on the transistor parameters.)
This means that for every turn on the primary (collector) winding of T2P1, 5 turns must 
be provided on the secondary base drive winding T2S1. Consequently, it will be seen that 
the base winding can be incremented only in steps of 5 turns.
The secondary voltage of T2S1 is defined at a diode drop D1 plus V
be
of Q1 (approxi-
mately 1.3 V), and this voltage, secondary turns T2S1, and core size set the frequency. A 
core size must now be selected so that the correct operating frequency will be obtained with 
5 turns (or an increment of 5 turns) on the base drive winding T2S1. (The smaller the core, 
the larger the number of turns for the same frequency.)
16.4 SELECTING CORE SIZE AND MATERIAL
Assume that the operating frequency is to be 50 kHz, that the required forced beta is 5, and 
that a single turn will be used on the collector winding. The secondary will have 5 turns, and 
the voltage seen by the secondary winding will be 1.3 V (V
be
plus a diode drop).
The area of core required for a half period (10 Ms ) can be calculated as follows:
A
Vt
BN
e
s
s

$
where V
s
 secondary voltage (1.3 V)
t half period (10 Ms)
$B  flux density change ( B to  B)
N
s
 secondary turns (5 in this case)
If the TDK H7A material is chosen, then from Fig. 2.15.4a, the saturating flux density at 
40°C is 0.42 T, and B  0.84 T peak-to-peak. Hence
A
e

r
r

13 10
084 5
310
.
.
. mm
2
From Table 2.15.1, the area required will be satisfied by core T 4–8–2, and this is selected 
for T2 in this example.
This core is now bifilar-wound with two wires of 5 turns to form the secondary windings 
T2S1 and T2S2. A wire to each transistor collector is passed through the toroid from oppo-
site directions to give a single primary turn for each transistor, and the drive transformer 
is complete. 
16.5 MAIN POWER TRANSFORMER DESIGN
The design of the main transformer follows the same procedure used for any driven push-
pull converter. Typical designs are covered in Part 3, Chap. 4.
Cut pages out of pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf file
Cut pages out of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
16. TWO-TRANSFORMER SELF-OSCILLATING CONVERTERS
2.139
16.6 PROBLEMS
1. What is the major advantage of the two-transformer self-oscillating converter?
2. Why is the two-transformer converter more suitable for high-power applications?
3. What is the functional name that is often applied to the square-wave self-oscillating 
converter?
4. What are the major disadvantages of the two-transformer self-oscillating converter?
5. By what process is staircase saturation eliminated in the two-transformer self-oscillating 
converter?
6. By what process is flux doubling eliminated in the two-transformer self-oscillating 
converter?
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image Cropper Control SDK to Cut Out Part of Image. Do you need to cut out certain unwanted part from one image file by VB.NET code?
delete blank page from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages of pdf; delete pages in pdf reader
This page intentionally left blank 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf reader; add and delete pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
delete pages from a pdf; delete blank page in pdf
2.141
THE DC-TO-DC TRANSFORMER 
CONCEPT 
17.1 INTRODUCTION
In all the forward converter topologies presented so far, the high-frequency transformer 
has been considered an integral part of the converter topology. However, it can be shown 
that the transformer does not change the fundamental form of the converter. The basic 
building blocks remain the buck and boost converters. In all the forward converter topol-
ogies, the main function of the transformer was to provide input-to-output galvanic 
isolation and voltage transformation.
It would be useful at this stage to introduce the concept of the ideal DC-to-DC trans-
former (a transformer that would provide a DC output for a DC input). Although this may 
seem a strange concept at first, consider the conventional ideal transformer model. The 
ideal transformer would pass all frequencies from DC upward in both directions, with no 
power loss. It would provide any required voltage or current ratio, and would have infinite 
galvanic isolation between input and output. It would also provide the same performance 
for all windings. Clearly such an ideal device does not exist.
17.2 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF THE DC-TO-DC 
TRANSFORMER CONCEPT
The reason that the DC-to-DC transformer concept seems strange should be recognized as 
the unquestioned acceptance of a nonideal device. The practical transformer can transform 
a DC input to a DC output only for a very short time, because it has a limited inductance 
and the core soon saturates. However, this practical limitation can be overcome by reversing 
all terminals of the transformer before saturation occurs.
The rotary DC converter and the synchronous vibrator (shown in Fig. 2.17.1, but now 
obsolete) did just this, physically reversing the transformer input and output terminals 
with a commutator or an electromechanical synchronous relay. This simple vibrator will 
be examined in more detail.
In Fig. 2.17.1, switches S1(a) and S1(b) are on the same armature and are thus syn-
chronized to each other. This synchronous vibrator circuit (apart from its mechanical limi-
tations) provides a nearly ideal DC-to-DC transformer. It is interesting to note that it is 
symmetrical and hence fully bidirectional; it can transform DC from input to output or 
vice versa. This is entirely due to the bidirectional nature of the mechanical switches. This 
circuit provides a good model for the modern DC-to-DC transformer concept.
CHAPTER 17 
2.141
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Please have a quick test by using the following C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
delete pdf pages in preview; delete page on pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages pdf
2.142
PART 2
In the modern semiconductor equivalent, the bidirectional property is lost as a result 
of replacing the mechanical switches by unidirectional semiconductors. In the square-
wave DC-to-DC converter, the primary switching S1(a) is provided by two unidirectional 
transistors or power FETs, and the secondary synchronous switching S1(b) by diode 
rectification. However, the basic concept is the same as that of the synchronous vibrator 
(keep reversing the input and output of the transformer before saturation can occur, and 
thus provide DC-to-DC transformation).
17.3 DC-TO-DC TRANSFORMER EXAMPLE 
In this example, a push-pull converter will be used to demonstrate the principle. Figure 2.17.2 
shows a typical self-oscillating square-wave converter. This type of converter is character-
ized by full conduction angle operation; that is, no pulse-width modulation is applied, and 
each transistor is conducting for a full 50% of the period. Consequently, in this simple 
form, the converter will not provide regulation and the DC output voltages will change in 
sympathy with the input.
When operated in this mode, the converter is a true DC-to-DC transformer. Its main 
functions are to provide DC voltage and current step-up or step-down, galvanic isolation, 
and multiple outputs. The outputs may be isolated, common, or inverted as required.
Being self-oscillating, the converter has the advantage of very low cost, since very few 
drive components are required. The full conduction angle results in a near DC input and 
output, so that very little filtering will be required.
The output impedance of the DC-to-DC transformer reflects the input impedance and 
can be very low. The transformer utility and the efficiency are very high as a result of the 
full conduction angle operation. For multiple-output applications, the tracking between 
independent outputs will be very good, typically better than 2%.
The simple self-oscillating converter shown in Fig. 2.17.2 is a modification of the Royer 
circuit, which has been described more fully in Chaps. 14, 15, and 16. Although this con-
verter normally depends on saturation of the transformer to initiate commutation, in this 
example the collector current at commutation is specified by R3 and R4 and the zener 
FIG. 2.17.1 DC-to-DC transformer (mechanical synchronous vibra-
tor type). 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page pdf file reader; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for your C# project.
delete pages on pdf; delete page in pdf file
17. THE DC-TO-DC TRANSFORMER CONCEPT
2.143
voltages D1 and D2, and the transformer does not saturate; hence a measure of overload 
protection is provided. This is a considerable improvement on the gain-limited switching 
action of the original Royer circuit.
There are many variations of this simple DC-to-DC converter, but the principle of opera-
tion will be similar. The main attractions are the extremely low cost and efficient operation. 
The frequency variations that occur with these simple systems (because of input voltage 
and load changes) are sometimes considered a disadvantage. However, since the input and 
output should be DC, the frequency of operation should not matter, and with efficient 
screening should be acceptable in all cases. 
The DC-to-DC transformer (self-oscillating square-wave converter) is unlikely to be 
used on its own because it does not provide regulation. Hence it is normally supplemented 
with other regulating circuits to form a regulated system.
For low-power applications up to, say, 10 W, this type of converter is often used with 
linear three-terminal output regulators to provide fully regulated multiple outputs from a 
single DC input.
These low-power regulated converters are very often manufactured as small encapsu-
lated units, and may be used to generate extra local supply voltages. They will often be 
mounted directly on the users’ printed circuit boards.
For larger-power applications, the simple single-transformer circuit may be used to 
provide the drive to a larger converter, giving rise to the two-transformer self-oscillating 
converter. The advantage is that the larger transformer will not be operated in a saturated 
mode.
The DC-to-DC transformer may be preceded by a switching regulator, with the control 
loop closed to the output of the DC transformer. This combination is ideal for multiple-
output applications, since the low source impedance for the DC-to-DC transformer provides 
very good load and cross regulation for the additional auxiliary outputs. This technique is 
described more fully in Chap. 18.
FIG. 2.17.2 DC transformer (transistor, self-oscillating, square-wave, push-pull converter 
with biphase rectification).
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page
delete pdf pages in reader; delete pages on pdf online
2.144
PART 2
It should be noticed that the DC-to-DC converter, in its ideal form, only provides volt-
age conversion and primary to secondary isolation, and as such it is just a benign building 
block. It does not change the basic properties of the  power control method. A buck regula-
tor remains a buck regulator and retains the transfer properties of its type, as will the boost 
regulator. Very often the buck or boost action will be integrated into the DC-DC converter 
making it difficult to see this basic relationship.
In conclusion, a buck or boost type regulator proceeding or following a DC-DC con-
verter, or even integrated into a DC-DC converter, will retain the overall properties of its 
basic buck or boost origin.
17.4 PROBLEMS
1. In the “ideal transformer,” the transmission of DC current would be possible. Why is this 
not possible in practical applications? 
2. What are the basic requirements of a high-frequency square-wave converter to satisfy 
the DC transformer concept?
3. Give the ideal transfer functions of the DC transformer.
4. What advantages does the DC transformer provide in multiple-output applications?
2.145
MULTIPLE-OUTPUT 
COMPOUND 
REGULATING SYSTEMS 
18.1 INTRODUCTION
It has been shown9,10,14–17 that it is possible to combine DC-to-DC transformers (non-
regulated DC-to-DC converter circuits) with buck- or boost-derived regulators to produce 
regulated single- or multiple-output converter combinations.
Using integrated magnetics and various modeling techniques,16 a wide range of possible 
combinations have been demonstrated. In many cases, these combinations are not clearly 
distinguishable as combinations of converters. Various advantages and disadvantages are 
claimed for each combination; for example, in the C
´
uk converter it has been shown that 
by combining output and input chokes it is possible to suppress the input and output ripple 
currents to near zero. Hence combinations of converters can provide some very useful 
properties.
The power supply designer who is fully conversant with the various combinations and 
is able to select the most appropriate for a particular application has at his disposal very 
powerful design tools.
Full coverage of the many techniques is beyond the scope of this book, but one par-
ticularly useful topology is covered in the following sections. For more information, the 
interested engineer should study the many excellent papers and books referred to in the 
Bibliography.
18.2 BUCK REGULATOR, CASCADED 
WITH A DC-TO-DC TRANSFORMER
The following section considers just one of the more popular and straightforward arrange-
ments of a buck regulator cascaded with a square-wave free-running voltage-fed DC-to-DC 
converter (referred to as a DC transformer in Part 2, Chap. 17). The general block schematic
for a FET version of this converter is shown in Fig. 2.18.1. This combination is particularly 
useful for multiple-output off-line switchmode supplies.
CHAPTER 18 
2.145
2.146
PART 2
18.3 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
In simple terms, in the example shown in Fig. 2.18.1, the input buck regulator FET1, L1, 
and D1 reduces the high-voltage (300-V) input to a more manageable preregulated 200-V 
DC to the push-pull DC transformer FET2, FET3, and T1. The control loop of the buck 
regulator is closed to the main output of the DC transformer, to maintain this output and 
hence the other auxiliary outputs near constant.
In push-pull operation, the DC transformer FETs are subjected to a voltage stress of at 
least twice the preregulated supply voltage. The buck regulator, by reducing this voltage 
and removing input variations, considerably reduces the stress on the converter FETs and 
improves the reliability.
The voltage control loop is closed to the output that is to be most highly regulated, in 
this case the 5-V output, by amplifier A1 and optical coupler OC1. Thus, the buck regula-
tor maintains the DC supply to the DC transformer section at a level that will maintain 
the 5-V output constant. Since the input to the converter section is now almost entirely 
isolated from ac supply variations, and a much lower voltage stress is applied to the con-
verter switching components, there will be a reduction in output ripple and improved 
reliability. 
Further, as a result of the closed-loop control, the DC transformer volts per turn will be 
maintained constant (to the first order), and any other outputs wound on the same trans-
former will be semistabilized.
For input voltage transients, the natural filtering provided by the large input capacitor 
C1 and the buck regulator and filter L1, C2 gives good noise immunity. A small low-pass 
filter on the output further eliminates switching and rectifier recovery noise from the 
output. Since the DC transformer runs under full duty ratio (square-wave) conditions, 
the rectified output is nearly DC, and only a small high-frequency filter is required in the 
output circuit. This becomes particularly cost-effective where a large number of outputs 
are required.
In some applications, the converter operating frequency will be synchronized to the 
buck regulator to prevent low-frequency intermodulation components, which tend to gener-
ate extra output ripple.
A power FET is used in the buck regulator section so that it can be operated at a high fre-
quency without introducing excessive switching loss. This arrangement means that several 
power pulses will be provided from the buck regulator for each half cycle of the converter 
section, reducing intermodulation ripple.
FIG.  2.18.1 Voltage-regulated DC-to-DC transformer  (DC  converter), consisting  of  a 
combination of a primary buck switching regulator and a DC-to-DC transformer.
18. MULTIPLE-OUTPUT COMPOUND REGULATING SYSTEMS
2.147
This buck-derived combination is subject to low-frequency instability at light loads 
when a bipolar switch is used in the buck regulator position. This instability is believed 
to be caused by modulation of the storage time of the bipolar transistor by direct positive 
feedback from the DC transformer section. The effect is difficult to compensate, because 
it is outside of the normal control loop. The negligible storage time of a FET switch in 
the buck regulator position eliminates this problem.
It should be noted that the DC transformer is voltage-fed, capacitor C2 being large 
enough to maintain the voltage nearly constant over a cycle. This provides a low-
impedence ripple-free preregulated DC input to the DC transformer and permits the use 
of secondary duty ratio control if additional secondary regulation is required. It also 
reduces cross-regulation effects. Without additional secondary regulation, output regu-
lation on the auxiliary outputs of ±5% would be expected when the loop is closed to the 
5-V output, or ±2% when the loop is closed to a higher-voltage, lower-current output.
18.4 BUCK REGULATOR SECTION
Figure 2.18.2 shows in block schematic form the basic elements of the buck regulator sec-
tion. In general, this is a current-mode-controlled system, very similar to the buck regulator 
described in Chap. 20.
FIG. 2.18.2 Voltage-regulated DC-to-DC transformer, using current-mode control on the buck 
regulator section with the voltage control loop closed to the secondary.
Briefly, the buck regulator power FET is turned on in response to a clock signal from the 
oscillator section. It is turned off in response to the current in L1 as sensed by the current 
transformer CT1. The current switching level is defined by the much slower voltage control 
loop from the output via A1 and OC1.
The clock signal from the oscillator section sets the bistable switch D1 to turn on the 
series power switch FET1, which then delivers current to the series inductor L1. 
During the “on” period, the current in inductor L1 will increase, and this increase is 
translated by the current transformer CT1 to a ramp voltage on the input of the voltage 
comparator A2. When the amplitude of the ramp voltage has reached the reference value 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested