c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pdf pages reader application control utility azure html web page visual studio Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi4-part508

1.8
PART 1
1.15 OVERLOAD PROTECTION (INPUT 
POWER LIMITING) 
Power limiting is usually applied to the primary circuits and is concerned with limiting the 
maximum throughput power of the power converter. In multiple-output converters this is often 
necessary because, in the interest of maximum versatility, the sum of the independent output 
current limits often has a total VA rating in excess of the maximum converter capability. 
Primary power limiting is often provided as additional backup protection, even where 
normal output current limiting would prevent output overloading conditions. Fast-acting 
primary  limiting  has the advantage of preventing  power  device  failure under unusual 
transient loading conditions, when the normal secondary current limiting may not be fast 
enough to be fully effective. Furthermore, the risk of fire or excessive power supply damage 
in the event of a component failure is reduced. Power supplies with primary power limiting 
usually have a much higher reliability record than those without this additional protection. 
1.16 OUTPUT CURRENT LIMITING 
In higher-power switchmode units, each output line is independently current-limited. The 
current limit should protect the supply under all load conditions including short-circuit. 
Continuous operation in a current-limited mode should not cause overdissipation or failure of the 
power supply. The switchmode unit (unlike the linear regulator) should have a constant current 
limit. By its nature, the switching supply does not dissipate excessive power under short-circuit 
conditions, and a constant current limit is far less likely to give the user such problems as “lockout” 
under nonlinear or cross-coupled load conditions. (Cross-coupled loads are loads that are con-
nected between a positive and a negative output line without connection to the common line.) 
Linear regulators traditionally have reentrant (foldback) current limiting in order to 
prevent excessive dissipation in the series element under short-circuit conditions. Section 
14.5 covers the problems associated with cross-coupled loads and reentrant current limits 
more fully. 
1.17 BASE DRIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
HIGH-VOLTAGE BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS 
In direct-off-line SMPSs the voltage stress on the main switching devices can be very large, 
of the order of 800 to 1000 V in the case of the flyback converter. 
Apart from the obvious needs for high-voltage transistors, “snubber” networks, load 
line shaping, and antisaturation diodes, many devices require base drive waveform shaping. 
In particular, the base current is often required to ramp down during the turn-off edge at a 
controlled rate for best performance. (See Part 1, Chap. 15.) 
1.18 PROPORTIONAL DRIVE CIRCUITS 
With bipolar transistors, base drive currents in excess of those required to saturate the 
transistor reduce efficiency and can cause excessive turn-off storage times with reduced 
control at light loads. 
Delete pdf pages reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page numbers in pdf; delete page from pdf online
Delete pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf file
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.9
Improved performance can be obtained by making the base drive current proportional 
to the collector current. Suitable circuits are shown in Part 1, Chap. 16.
1.19 ANTISATURATION TECHNIQUES 
With bipolar transistors, in the switching mode, improved turn-off performance can be 
obtained by preventing “hard” saturation. The transistor can be maintained in a quasi-
saturated state by maintaining the drive current at a minimum defined by the gain and 
collector current. However, since the gain of the transistor changes with device, load, and 
temperature, a dynamic control is required. 
Antisaturation circuits are often combined with proportional drive techniques. Suitable 
methods are shown in Part 1, Chap. 17. 
1.20 SNUBBER NETWORKS 
This is a power supply engineering term used to describe networks which provide turn-on 
and turn-off load line shaping for a switching device.
Load line shaping is required to prevent breakdown by maintaining the switching device 
within its “safe operating area” throughout the switching cycle. 
In many cases snubber networks also reduce RFI problems as a result of the reduced 
dv/dt on switching elements, although this is not their primary function. 
1.21 CROSS CONDUCTION 
In half-bridge, full-bridge, and push-pull applications, a DC path exists between the supply 
lines if the “on” states of the two switching devices overlap. This is called “cross conduc-
tion” and can cause immediate failure. 
To prevent this condition, a “dead time” (a period when both devices are off) is often 
provided in the drive waveform. To maintain full-range pulse-width control, a dynamic 
dead time may be provided. (See Part 1, Chap. 19.) 
1.22 OUTPUT FILTERING, COMMON-MODE 
NOISE, AND INPUT-TO-OUTPUT ISOLATION 
These parameters have been linked together, as they tend to be mutually interdependent. In 
switchmode supplies, high voltages and high currents are being switched at very fast rates 
of change at ever-increasing frequencies. This gives rise to electrostatic and electromag-
netic radiation within the power supply. The electrostatic coupling between high-voltage 
switching elements and the output circuit or ground can produce particularly troublesome 
common-mode noise problems. 
The problems associated with common-mode  noise are sometimes not recognized, 
and there is a tendency to leave this requirement out of the power supply specifications. 
Common-mode noise can cause system problems, and it is good power supply design 
practice to minimize the capacitance between the switching elements and chassis and to 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from a pdf reader
1.10
PART 1
provide Faraday screens between the primary and secondary of the power transformer. 
Where switching elements are to be mounted on the chassis for cooling purposes, an insu-
lated Faraday screen should be placed between the switching element and the mounting 
surface. This screen and any other Faraday screens in the transformer should be returned to 
one of the input DC supply lines so as to return capacitively coupled currents to the source. 
In many cases, the transformer will require an additional safety screen connected to earth 
or chassis. This safety screen should be positioned between the RF Faraday screen and the 
output windings. 
In rare cases (where the output voltages are high), a second Faraday screen may be 
required between the safety screen and the output windings to reduce output common-
mode current. This screen should be returned to the common output line, as close as pos-
sible to the transformer common-line connection pin. 
The screens, together with the necessary insulation, increase the spacing between the 
primary and secondary windings, thereby increasing the leakage inductance and degrading 
transformer performance. It should be noted that the Faraday screen does not need to meet 
the high current capacity of the safety screens and therefore can be made from lightweight 
material and connections. (See Part 1, Chaps. 3 and 4.) 
1.23 POWER FAILURE SIGNALS 
To allow time for “housekeeping” functions in computer systems, a warning of impending
shutdown is often required from the power supply. Various methods are used, and typically 
a warning signal should be given at least 5 ms before the power supply outputs fall below 
their minimum specified values. This is required to allow time for a controlled shutdown 
of the computer. 
In many cases, simple power failure systems are used that recognize the presence or 
absence of the AC line input and give a TTL low signal within a few milliseconds of line 
failure. It should be recognized that the line input passes through zero twice in each cycle 
under normal conditions; since this must not be recognized as a failure, there is usually a 
delay of several milliseconds before a genuine failure can be recognized. When a line fail-
ure has been recognized, the normal holdup time of the power supply should provide output 
voltage for a further period, allowing time for the necessary housekeeping procedures. 
Two undesirable limitations of these simple systems should be recognized. First, if 
a “brownout” condition precedes the power failure, the output voltage may fall below 
the minimum value without a power failure signal being generated. Second, if the line 
input voltage to the power supply immediately prior to failure is close to the minimum 
required for normal operation, the holdup time will be severely diminished, and the time 
between a power failure warning and supply shutdown may not be long enough for effec-
tive housekeeping. 
For critical applications, more sophisticated power failure warning systems that rec-
ognize brownout should be used. If additional holdup time is required, charge dumping 
techniques should be considered. (See Part 1, Chap. 12.) 
1.24 POWER GOOD SIGNALS 
“Power good” signals are sometimes required from the power supply. These are usually
TTL-compatible outputs that go to a “power good” (high state) when all power supply volt-
ages are within their specified operating window. “Power good” and “power failure” signals 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page in pdf document; delete pages from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.11
are sometimes combined. LED (light-emitting diode) status indicators are often provided 
with the “power good” signals, to give a visual indication of the power supply status. 
1.25 DUAL INPUT VOLTAGE OPERATION 
With the trend toward international trading it is becoming increasingly necessary to provide 
switchmode supplies for dual input, nominally 110/220-V operation. A wide variety of 
techniques are used to meet these dual-voltage requirements, including single or multiple 
transformer tap changes that may be manual or automatic, and selectable voltage doubling. 
If auxiliary transformers and cooling fans are used, these must be considered in the dual-
voltage connection.
A useful method of avoiding the need for special dual-voltage fans and auxiliary trans-
formers is shown in Part 1, Chap. 23. It should be remembered that the insulation of the 
auxiliary transformer and fan must meet the safety requirements for the highest-voltage 
input. More recently, high-efficiency “brushless” DC fans have become available; these can 
be driven by the supply output, overcoming insulation and tap change problems. 
The voltage doubler technique with one or two link changes is probably the most cost-
effective and is generally favored in switchmode supplies. However, when this method 
is used, the design of the filter, the input fuse, and inrush limiting should be considered. 
When changing the input voltage links the low-voltage tap position gives higher current 
stress, whereas the higher tap position gives greater voltage stress. The need to meet both 
conditions results in more expensive filter components. Therefore, dual-voltage operation 
should not be specified unless this is a real system requirement. 
1.26 POWER SUPPLY HOLDUP TIME 
One of the major advantages of switchmode over linear supplies is their ability to maintain 
the output voltages constant for a short period after line failure. This “holdup time” is typi-
cally 20 ms, but depends on when during the input cycle the power failure occurs and the 
loading and the supply voltage before the line failure. 
A major factor controlling the holdup time is the history and amplitude of the supply 
voltage immediately prior to the failure condition. Most specifications define holdup time 
from nominal input voltage and loading. Holdup times may be considerably less if the sup-
ply voltage is close to its minimum value immediately prior to failure. 
Power supplies that are specified for long holdup times at minimum input voltages are 
either expensive because of the increased size of input capacitors, or less efficient because 
the power converter must now maintain the output voltage constant for a much lower input 
voltage. This usually results in less efficient operation at nominal line inputs. Charge dump-
ing techniques should be considered when long holdup times are required at low input 
voltages. (See Part 1, Chap. 12.) 
1.27 SYNCHRONIZATION 
Synchronization of the switching frequency is sometimes called for, particularly when 
the  supply is to be used  for VDU (visual display unit) applications. Although syn-
chronization is of dubious value in most cases, as adequate screening and filtering of 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
pdf delete page; delete pages pdf preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete page in pdf reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
1.12
PART 1
the supply should eliminate the need, it must be recognized that systems engineers often 
specify it. 
The constraints placed on the power supply design by specifying synchronization are 
severe; for example, low-cost variable frequency systems cannot be used. Furthermore, the 
synchronization port gives access to the drive circuit of the main converter and provides a 
means whereby the operating integrity of the converter can be disrupted. 
The possibility of badly defined or incorrect synchronization information must be 
considered in the design of synchronizable systems; techniques used should be as insen-
sitive as possible to abuse. The system engineer should be aware that it is difficult to 
guarantee that a power supply will not be damaged by incorrect or badly defined syn-
chronization signals. Because of the need to prevent saturation in wound components, 
most switchmode supplies use oscillator designs which can be synchronized only to 
frequencies higher than the natural oscillation frequency. Also, the synchronization range 
is often quite limited. 
1.28 EXTERNAL INHIBIT 
For system control, it is often necessary to turn the power supply on or off by external 
electronic means. Typically a TTL high signal will define the “on” condition and a TTL 
low the “off’ condition. Activation of this electronic inhibit should invoke the normal soft-
start sequence of the power supply when it is turned on. Power supplies for which this 
remote control function is required often need internal auxiliary supplies that are common 
to the output. The auxiliary supply must be present irrespective of main converter opera-
tion. This apparently simple requirement may define the complete design strategy for the 
auxiliary supplies. 
1.29 FORCED CURRENT SHARING 
Voltage-controlled power supplies, by their nature, are low-output-impedance  devices. 
Since the output voltage and performance characteristics of two or more units will never 
be identical, the units will not naturally share the load current when they are operated in 
parallel.
Various methods are used to force current sharing (see Part 1, Chap. 24). However, in 
most cases these techniques force current sharing by degrading the output impedance (and 
consequently the load regulation) of the supply. Hence the load regulation performance in 
parallel forced current sharing applications will usually be lower than that found with a 
single unit. 
A possible exception is the master-slave technique which tends to a voltage-controlled 
current source. However, the master-slave technique has the disadvantage of its inability 
to provide good parallel redundant operation. A failure of the master system usually results 
in complete system failure. 
Interconnected systems of current-mode control topologies can resolve some of these 
problems, but the tendency for noise pickup on the P-terminal (parallel current sharing) 
link between units makes it somewhat difficult to implement in practice. Further, if one unit 
is used to provide the control signal, failure of this unit will shut down the whole system, 
which is again contrary to the needs of a parallel redundant system. 
The forced current sharing system described in Part 1, Chap. 24 does not suffer from 
these difficulties. Although the output regulation is slightly degraded, the variation in 
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
delete pages of pdf online; add and remove pages from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; cut pages out of pdf online
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.13
output voltage in normal circumstances is only a few millivolts, which should be acceptable 
for most practical applications. 
Failure to provide current sharing means that one or more of the power supplies will be 
operating in a maximum current limited mode, while others are hardly loaded. However, so 
long as the current limits for the units are set at a value where continuous operation in the 
current limited mode gives reasonable power supply life, simple direct parallel connection 
can be used.
1.30 REMOTE SENSING 
If the load is situated some distance from the power supply, and the supply-lead voltage 
drops are significant, improved performance will be obtained if a remote voltage sense is 
used for the power supply. In principle, the reference voltage and amplifier comparator 
inputs are connected to the remote load by voltage sensing lines separate from the current-
carrying lines to remove the line-drop effects. These remote sense leads carry negligible
currents, so the voltage drop is also negligible. This arrangement permits the power supply 
to compensate for the voltage drops in the output power leads by increasing the supply volt-
age as required. In low-voltage, high-current applications, this facility is particularly useful. 
However, the user should be aware of at least three limitations of this technique: 
1. The maximum external voltage drop that can be tolerated in the supply leads is typically 
limited to 250 mV in both go and return leads (500 mV overall). In a 100-A 5-V applica-
tion, this represents an extra 50 W from the power supply, and it should be remembered 
that this power is being dissipated in the supply lines. 
2. Where power supplies are to be connected in a parallel redundant mode, it is common 
practice to isolate each supply with a series diode. The principle here is that if one power 
supply should short-circuit, the diode will isolate this supply from the remaining units. 
If this connection is used, then the voltage at the terminals of the power supply 
must be at least 0.7 V higher than the load, neglecting any lead losses, and the required 
terminal voltage may exceed the power supply’s design maximum unless the supply 
is specifically designed for this mode of operation. Furthermore, it must be borne in 
mind that in the event of power supply failure in this parallel redundant mode, the 
amplifier sense leads will still be connected to the load and will experience the load 
voltage. The remote sense circuit must be able to sustain this condition without further 
damage. 
It is common practice to link the remote sense terminals to the power supply output 
terminals with resistors within the supply to prevent loss of control and voltage over-
shoot in the event of the sense leads being disconnected. Where such resistors are used 
in the parallel redundant connection, they must be able to dissipate the appropriate 
power, 
V
R
out
/
2
, without failure in the event of the main terminal output voltage falling 
to zero. 
3. Remote sense terminals are connected to a high-gain part of the power amplifier loop. 
Consequently, any noise picked up in the remote sense leads will be translated as output 
voltage noise to the power supply terminals, degrading the performance. Further, the 
additional phase shifts caused by lead inductance and resistance can have a destabiliz-
ing effect. Therefore, it is recommended that remote sense leads be twisted to minimize 
inductance and noise pickup. 
Unless they are correctly matched and terminated, coaxial leads are not recom-
mended, as the distributed capacitance can degrade the transient performance.
1.14
PART 1
1.31 P-TERMINAL LINK 
In power supplies where provision is made to interlink one or more units in a parallel 
forced current sharing mode, current sharing communication between supplies is required. 
This link is normally referred to as the P-terminal link. In master-slave applications this 
link allows the master to control the output regulators of the slave units. In forced current 
sharing applications this link provides communication between the power supplies, indi-
cating the average load current and allowing each supply to adjust its output to the correct 
proportion of the total load. Once again, the P-terminal link is a noise-sensitive input, so the 
connections should be routed so as to minimize the noise pickup. (See Part 1, Chap. 24.) 
1.32 LOW-VOLTAGE CUTOUT
In most applications, the auxiliary supplies to the power unit are derived from the same sup-
ply lines as the main converter. For the converter to start up under controlled conditions, it is 
necessary that the supply to both the main converter and the auxiliary circuits be correctly 
conditioned before the power converter action commences. It is normal practice to provide 
a drive inhibiting circuit which is activated when the auxiliary supply falls below a value 
which can guarantee proper operation. This “low-voltage inhibit” prevents the converter 
from starting up during the power-up phase until the supply voltage is sufficiently high to 
ensure proper operation. Once the converter is running, if the supply voltage falls below 
a second, lower value, the converter action will be inhibited; this hysteresis is provided to 
prevent squegging at the threshold voltage. 
1.33 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT LIMIT 
ADJUSTMENTS 
The use of potentiometers for voltage and current limit adjustments is not recommended,
except for initial prototype applications. Power supply voltages and current limits, once set, 
are very rarely adjusted. Most potentiometers become noisy and unreliable unless they are 
periodically exercised, and this causes noisy and unreliable performance. Where adjust-
ments are to be provided, high-grade potentiometers must be used. 
1.34 INPUT SAFETY REQUIREMENTS 
Most  countries  have  strict  regulations  governing  safety  in  electrical  apparatus, 
including power supplies. UL (Underwriters Laboratories), VDE (Verband Deutscher 
Elektrotechniker), IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), and CSA (Canadian 
Standards Association) are typical examples of the bodies formulating these regulations. 
It should be remembered that these regulations define minimum insulation, spacing, and 
creepage distance requirements for printed  circuit boards,  transformers, and  other 
components. 
Meeting these specifications will have an impact on performance and must be an inte-
gral part of the design exercise. It is very difficult to modify units to meet safety regulations 
after they have been designed. Consequently, drawing office and design staff should be 
continually alert to these requirements during the design phase. Furthermore, the technical 
1. COMMON REQUIREMENTS: AN OVERVIEW
1.15
requirements for high performance tend to be incompatible with the spacing requirements 
for the safety specifications. Consequently, a prototype unit designed without full attention 
to the safety spacing needs may give an excessively optimistic view of performance which 
cannot be maintained in the fully approvable finished product. 
A requirement often neglected is that ground wires, safety screens, and screen connec-
tions must be capable of carrying the fuse fault current without rupture, to prevent loss 
of safety ground connections under fault conditions. Further, any removable mountings 
(which, for example, may have been used to provide an earth connection from the printed 
circuit board to earth or chassis) must have a provision for hard wiring of the ground of the 
host equipment main frame. Mounting screws alone do not meet the safety requirements 
for some authorities.
This page intentionally left blank 
1.17
AC POWERLINE SURGE 
PROTECTION
2.1 INTRODUCTION 
With the advent of “direct-off-line” switchmode power supplies using sensitive electronic
primary control circuits, the need for input AC powerline transient surge protection has 
become more universally recognized. 
Measurements carried out by the IEEE over a number of years have demonstrated, on 
a statistical basis, the likely frequency of occurrence, typical amplitudes, and waveshapes 
to be expected in various locations as a result of artificial and naturally occurring electri-
cal phenomena. These flndings are published in IEEE Standard 587–1980* and are shown 
in Table 1.2.1. This work provides a basis for the design of AC powerline transient surge 
protection devices.40
2.2 LOCATION CATEGORIES 
In general terms, the surge stress to be expected depends on the location of the equipment to 
be protected. When equipment is inside a building, the stress depends on the distance from 
the electrical service entrance to the equipment location, the size and length of connection 
wires, and the complexity of the branch circuits. IEEE Standard 587–1980 proposes three 
location categories for low-voltage AC powerlines (less than 600 V). These are shown in 
Fig. 1.2.1, and described as follows:
1. Category A, Outlets and Long Branch Circuits. This is the lowest-stress category; it 
applies to
a. All outlets more than 10 m (30 ft) from Category B with #14 to #10 wires. 
b. All outlets at more than 20 m (60 ft) from the service entrance with #14 to #10 
wires. In these remote locations, far away from the service entrance, the stress volt-
age may be of the order of 6 kV, but the stress currents are relatively low, of the 
order of 200 A maximum. 
2. Category B, Major Feeders and Short Branch Circuits. This category covers the highest-
stress conditions likely to be seen by a power supply. It applies to the following locations: 
a. Distribution panel devices
b. Bus and feeder systems in industrial plants 
*Also issued under ANSI/IEEE Standard C64.41–1980 and IEC Publication 664–1980. 
CHAPTER 2
1.17
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested