c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net web page mvc Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi40-part509

2.168
PART 2
When Q1 turns off, the current in L1 will continue to flow in the same direction and will 
take point A positive. When the voltage at point A exceeds the output voltage on capaci-
tor C1, rectifier diode D1 will conduct, and the inductor current will be transferred to the 
output capacitor and load. Since the output voltage exceeds the supply voltage, L1 will now 
be reverse-biased, and the current in L1 will decay linearly during the “off” period of Q1 
back toward its starting value.
Unlike in the buck regulator, the current into the output capacitor C1 from rectifier 
diode D1 is discontinuous, and a much larger output capacitor will be required if the output 
ripple voltage is to be as low as in the buck regulator. The ripple current in C1 is also much 
larger.
To the boost regulator’s advantage, the input current is now continuous (although there 
will be a ripple component depending on the value of the inductance L1); hence less input 
filtering is required, and the tendency for input filter instability is eliminated.
As with the buck regulator, for steady-state conditions, the forward and reverse volt-
seconds across L1 must equate. The output voltage V
out
is controlled by the duty ratio of the 
power switch, and the supply voltage, as follows.
By inspection (to meet the volt-seconds equality on L1),
Vt
V
V t
in on
out
in
off

(
)
Therefore
V
V
t
t
t
out
in
off
on
off

¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
But
t
t
t
off
on
off
D

1
1
Hence
V
V
out
in
D

1
It will be seen from this equation that the output voltage is not related to load current 
(neglecting losses), and the output resistance is very low. Again, this is true only when the 
load current is not below the critical value shown in Fig. 2.20.1b.At loads lower than the 
critical value, the duty ratio must be reduced to maintain a constant output voltage.
It should also be noted that in the boost regulator, a sudden increase in load current 
requires that the “on” period be increased initially (to increase the current in L1 and to 
make up for voltage losses). However, increasing the “on” time reduces the “off” time, 
and the output voltage will initially fall (the reverse of what is required) until the cur-
rent in L1 increases to the new load level. This corresponds to 180° phase shift during 
the transient, and is the cause of the right-half-plane zero in the transfer function. (See 
Part 3, Chap. 9.) 
The value of L1 is usually chosen to ensure that the critical current is below the mini-
mum load requirement. Further, L1 must not saturate at maximum load and maximum “on” 
period.
Delete pages pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from a pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
Delete pages pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete page from pdf document
20. DC-TO-DC SWITCHING REGULATORS
2.169
20.2.3 Type 3, The Inverting-type Switching Regulator
Figure 2.20.3a shows the power circuit of a typical inverting (buck-boost) regulator that 
operates as discussed below.
When Q1 is “on,” current will build up linearly in inductor L1 (loop A). Diode D1 is 
reverse-biased and blocks under steady-state conditions. When Q1 turns off, the current 
in L1 will continue in the same direction, taking point A negative (by normal flyback 
action). When the voltage at point A goes more negative than the output voltage, diode D1 
is brought into conduction, transferring the inductor current into the output capacitor C1 
and load (loop B).
During the “off” period, the voltage across  L1 is reversed,  and  the current will 
decrease linearly toward its original value. The output voltage depends on the supply 
voltage and duty cycle D  t
on
/(t
on
 t
off
), and this is adjusted to maintain the required 
output. The current waveforms are the same as those for the boost regulator, shown in 
Fig. 2.20.2b.
As previously, the forward and reverse volt-seconds on L1 must equate for steady-state 
conditions, and to meet this volt-seconds equality (neglecting polarity),
V t
V t
in on
out off

Therefore
V
V
t
t
out
in
on
off

¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
The ratio t
on
/t
off
can be expressed in terms of D as D/(1   D). Hence
V
V
out
in
D
1 D

)
Note that the output voltage is of reversed polarity but may be greater or less than V
in
,
depending on the duty cycle. 
In the inverting regulator, both input and output currents are discontinuous, and consid-
erable filtering will be required on both input and output. 
20.2.4 Type 4,The C
´
uk Regulator 
Since its introduction in 1977 by Slobodan C
´
uk9 (pronounced Chook, to rhyme with book) 
the “boost-buck” regulator shown in Fig. 2.20.4a, which C
´
uk described as the “optimum 
topology converter,” has attracted a great deal of interest. It was the first major new switch-
ing regulator topology to appear for some years. Subsequent analysis and duality circuit 
modeling show that this circuit is the dual of the type 3 inverting (buck-boost) regulator.16
For the C
´
uk regulator, some of the major features of interest to the power supply 
engineer are as follows: 
1. Both input and output currents are continuous; further, the input and output ripple cur-
rents and voltages may be suppressed to zero by correct coupling of L1 and L2. 
2. Although in the basic topology the polarity of the output voltage is reversed, the output 
voltage may have values that are equal to, higher than, or lower than those of the input 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf document; cut pages from pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages ipad; add and delete pages from pdf
2.170
PART 2
voltage. In fact, the input may range through the output voltage value, and the output 
can be maintained constant. 
3. By replacing diodes with active switching devices, it is possible to reverse the direc-
tion of energy transfer, a useful attribute for vehicle or machine control. (Although this 
bidirectional ability also applies to the previous regulator types, in the C
´
uk topology the 
transfer function is not changed by reversing the current flow.) 
4. As with other topologies, DC isolation of input and output (galvanic isolation) can 
be provided by introducing a transformer without compromising the other major 
features.
5. A major advantage in some applications is that failure of a diode or switching device 
will normally result in zero output (an advantage for crowbar-type overvoltage protec-
tion requirements).
20.2.5 Possible Problem Areas (C
´
uk Regulator)
The designer should be cautious of the following possible limitations of the C
´
uk regulator: 
1. Internal resonances can cause discontinuities in the transfer function or poor input ripple 
rejection at some frequencies. Check open-loop response to ensure that this will not be 
a problem for the intended application. 
FIG. 2.20.4 (a) Basic circuit of C
´
uk (boost-buck) regulator. (b) Storage phase. 
(c) Transfer phase.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages pdf online; delete page in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages in pdf
20. DC-TO-DC SWITCHING REGULATORS
2.171
2. In coupled inductor and transformer isolated versions, output voltage reversal can occur 
during initial “switch-on” as a result of inrush current coupling. 
3. As with any boost-derived topology, loop stability problems can occur as a result of the 
right-half-plane zero in the transfer function. (See Part 3, Chap. 9.) 
20.2.6 Operating Principle (C
´
uk Regulator)
The operation cycle of the C
´
uk regulator is more complex than those of the previous three 
types, and excellent papers on this topology have been published.9,10 However, in keeping 
with the previous simple volt-seconds approach, the following explanation is offered.
The operating principle is best understood by considering Fig. 2.20.4 under steady-state 
operation with the following initial conditions:
Input and output voltages are equal but of opposite polarity.
Q1 is operating with a 50% duty cycle (equal “on” and “off” times). 
The regulator is loaded at a current in excess of the critical value, so that L1 and L2 are 
continuously conducting (continuous-mode operation).
The two inductors are identical, so that L1  L2. Current is flowing into L1 from left to 
right (forward current direction) and into L2 from right to left (reverse current direction).
Note: Because the output and input voltages are equal, although of reversed polarity, and 
losses are assumed to be zero, the mean input current must equal the mean output current.
Let the voltage on C1 be V
in
V
out
(2 r V
in
in this example); also, let C1 be very large, so 
that its voltage does not change significantly during a cycle. Finally, let C1 terminal A be 
positive with respect to B.
Consider first the circuit shown in Fig. 2.20.4b with the operating conditions as specified 
above.
When Q1 turns on, point A will go to zero, and the current in inductor L1 will continue 
to flow into Q1 around loop 1. The voltage across L1 (V
L1
) will be the supply voltage act-
ing in the forward direction (from left to right), and the current in L1 will be increasing 
linearly.
Hence during the “on” period of Q1, the voltage applied to L1 (V
L1
), neglecting 
polarity, is 
V
V
L1
in

At the same time as the A terminal of C1 is taken to zero volts, the B terminal will be taken 
to  (2 r V
in
) (the starting voltage across C1). Diode D1 will be reverse-biased and hence 
open-circuit. The current in L2 will continue to flow from right to left into C1 and Q1, 
around loop 2, under the forcing action of L2. Hence, C1 will be discharging toward zero.
During this “on” period of Q1, the voltage applied to L
2
(V
L2
), neglecting polarity, is 
V
V
V
L2
in
out

2
SinceV
V
out
in

,
V
V
L2
in

Thus the volt-seconds applied to the output inductor are equal to the volt-seconds applied 
to the input inductor. Since the voltage is applied in the forward direction in one case and 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete blank pages in pdf files; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages pdf files
2.172
PART 2
the reverse direction in the other, the output current in L2 will increase at the same rate but 
in the opposite direction as that in L1. 
It is interesting to note at this stage that if L1 and L2 were wound on the same core 
with the same number of turns and phased correctly, the ripple current components would 
exactly cancel to zero, and the effective input and output currents would be a steady DC. 
This can in fact be done, although it is not considered further here.30
Consider Fig. 2.20.4c. When Q1 turns off, the forcing action of L2 will drive D1 into 
conduction (loop 4), taking the voltage at point B to zero (neglecting diode drops). At the 
same time, point A will have been taken to 2V
in
(the voltage across the capacitor), so that 
the voltage across L1 will have reversed, with an effective value of V
in
, but in the opposite 
direction to that in the “on” state; however, under the forcing action of L1, the current in L1 
will still continue in the forward direction, but will be decreasing. With Q1 “off,” the current 
path for L1 will be from the supply into C1 and through D1 (loop 3). 
Hence the voltage applied to L1 during the “off” period (V
L1
) is 
V
V
L1
in

Current is  now  flowing into terminal A of  capacitor C1,  replacing  the  previously 
removed charge. Since D1 is conducting, the voltage across L2 for the “off” period is 
simply V
out
(neglecting the diode drop), and the voltage polarity is such that the current in 
L2 will be decreasing. 
Hence the voltage applied to L2 during the “off” period (V
L2
) is 
V
V
L2
out

But
V
V
out
in

Hence
V
V
L
in
2

The volt-seconds applied to L1 and L2 are the same during the “on” and “off” periods. 
It has been shown that the magnitudes of the voltages and volt-seconds applied to L1 and 
L2 for both “on” and “off” periods are the same, although the polarities are reversed. Also, 
the forward and reverse volt-seconds equate for both inductors. Hence, with equal “on” and 
“off” periods, the initial assumed conditions for steady-state operation are satisfied. 
In general, to satisfy the “on” and “off” volt-seconds equality in, say, L1 (neglecting 
polarity),
V t
V
V t
in on
C1
in off

(
)
But
V
V
V
C1
in
out

Hence
V t
V t
in on
out off

Therefore
V
V
t
t
out
in
on
off

¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf preview; delete blank pages in pdf online
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete pdf pages
20. DC-TO-DC SWITCHING REGULATORS
2.173
But
D
t
t
t

on
on
off
(
)
Hence
V
VD
O
1 D

1
Applying this approach to L2 yields the same result. Hence for a 50% duty cycle 
(where t
on
t
off
), V
out
V
in
but the polarity is reversed. 
20.3 CONTROL AND DRIVE CIRCUITS
There are many suitable control and drive circuits in both discrete and integrated circuit 
form. Many of the single-ended control circuits used for the forward and flyback converters 
can be used for the C
´
uk regulator. 
Although many switching regulator control circuits use duty ratio control quite suc-
cessfully, current-mode control can be applied as well. This will yield advantages similar 
to those found in transformer converters.
Research and development work is still in progress on this interesting and useful 
range of regulators using transformers and chokes in integrated magnetic assemblies. 
Full coverage of these techniques is beyond the scope of this book. For more infor-
mation on this subject, the interested engineer should study papers by Slobodan C
´
uk,
R. D. Middlebrook., Rudolf P. Severns., Gordon E. Bloom., and others, some of which 
are covered in References 9, 10, 16, and 20. 
20.4 INDUCTOR DESIGN FOR SWITCHING 
REGULATORS 
It should be clear from the preceding that the inductors (or chokes) play a critical part in 
the performance of these regulators. 
These inductors carry a large component of DC current, as well as sustaining a large 
high-frequency ac stress. The inductor must not saturate for any normal condition, and for 
good efficiency the winding and core losses must be small. 
The choice of inductance is usually a compromise. Theoretically, the inductance 
can have any value. Large values are expensive and lossy, and give poor transient load 
response. However, they also have low ripple currents and give continuous conduction 
at light loads. Small values of inductance give high ripple currents, increasing switch-
ing losses and output ripple. Discontinuous conduction will occur at light loads, which 
changes the transfer function and can lead to instability. However, the transient response 
is good, and efficiency is high, size small, and cost low. The choice is a compromise 
between minimum size and cost, and acceptable ripple current values, consistent with 
continuous-mode conduction. 
Although there are no set rules, one arbitrary choice that is often applied is to choose 
an inductance such that the critical current (the current at which discontinuous conduc-
tion occurs) is below the minimum specified load current. (See Fig. 2.20.1a.) However, if 
the minimum load current is zero, this cannot be done. Hence, although this criterion may 
2.174
PART 2
be a useful guide, a well-designed regulator must work without instability well below the 
critical current value. 
It should be noted that although operation at currents below the critical value is permit-
ted, the load and line regulation will be degraded. Also, with the ripple regulator circuit 
(Sec. 20.7), the frequency can be very low at light loads. 
A practical approach used by the author is to chose the inductance value to be as small 
as possible consistent with acceptable ripple current. Values of ripple current between 10% 
and 30% of I
DC
load (maximum) are used depending on the ripple and transient response 
requirements. Remember, the smaller the inductance, the lower the cost and the better the 
transient load response. 
20.5 INDUCTOR DESIGN EXAMPLE 
Calculate the inductance required for a 10-A, 5-V type 1 buck regulator operating at 
40 kHz with an input voltage range from 10 to 30 V, when the ripple current is not to 
exceed 20% of I
DC
(2 A). 
Procedure: Maximum ripple current will occur when the input voltage is maximum— that 
is, when the voltage applied across the inductor is maximum.
1. Calculate the “on” time when the input is 30 V. 
t
V t
V
p
on
out
in

where t
p
 total period (t
on
t
off
)
Hence
t
on
s

r

5 25
30
4.166
M
2. Select the peak-to-peak ripple current. This is by choice 20% of I
DC
, or 2 A in this 
example. 
3. Calculate the voltage across the inductor V
L
during the on period.
V
V
V
L


in
out
25V
4. Calculate the inductance.
V
LdI dt
L

/
Therefore
L V
t
I
L


r
r

$
$
25 4 166 10
2
52
6
.
MH
The critical load will be 
12
1
/
p p
I

A, or 10% in this example.
The design of these inductors (chokes) is covered more fully in Part 3, Chaps. 1, 2, 
and 3. 
20. DC-TO-DC SWITCHING REGULATORS
2.175
20.6 GENERAL PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS 
Where input-to-output galvanic isolation is not essential, switching regulators can pro-
vide extremely efficient voltage conversion and regulation. In multiple-output switch-
mode power supply applications, independent fully regulated secondary outputs can be 
provided by these regulators. The performance of the overall power unit can then be 
extremely good. 
The user should specify the range of load currents for which full performance is required. 
This range should be as small as is realistic (the lower the minimum current, the larger the 
inductor and the cost). In particular, full performance continuous conduction at very light 
loads should not be demanded, since this may require a very large series inductor, which 
would be expensive and bulky and would introduce considerable power loss. 
20.7 THE RIPPLE REGULATOR 
A control technique that tends to be reserved for the buck-type switching regulator is the 
so-called “ripple regulator.”17 This is worthy of consideration here, as it provides excellent 
performance at very low cost. 
The “ripple regulator” is best understood by considering the circuit of the buck regulator 
shown in Fig. 2.20.5a.
FIG. 2.20.5  (a) Ripple-controlled  switching buck regulator  circuit 
(ripple regulator). (b) Output ripple voltage of ripple regulator. 
A high-gain comparator amplifier A1 compares a fraction of the output voltage V
out
with 
the reference V
R
; when the output fraction is higher than the reference, the series power 
switch Q1 will be turned off. A small hysteresis voltage (typically 40 mV) is provided by 
2.176
PART 2
positive feedback resistor R1, so that Q1 will stay “off” until the voltage has fallen by 40 mV, 
at which point Q1 will turn on again and the cycle will be repeated. 
By this action the output voltage is made to ramp up and down about its mean DC value 
between the upper and lower limits of the hysteresis range (Fig. 2.20.5b).
The time taken for the voltage to ramp up to the higher limit is defined by the value of 
the inductor, output capacitor, and supply voltage.
The time taken for the voltage to ramp down to the lower limit is defined by the output 
capacitor and load current. Since both periods are variable, the operating frequency is 
variable.
The output ripple is always constant at the hysteresis value (40 mV in this example), 
irrespective of load. If the load is very small, the frequency can be very low. 
20.8 PROBLEMS 
1. The term “switching regulator” is used to describe a particular type of DC-to-DC con-
verter. In what way do these converters differ from transformer-coupled converters? 
2. What is the major advantage of the switching regulator over the three-terminal linear 
regulator? 
3. Explain the major transfer properties of the following regulators: buck regulator, boost 
regulator, inverting regulator, and C
´
uk regulator. 
4. In what way does the C
´
uk regulator differ from the three previous types of regulators? 
5. Why is the boost regulator particularly prone to loop stability problems? 
6. Describe some of the limitations of the coupled inductor integrated magnetic C
´
uk regu-
lator. 
7. Why is a minimum load necessary on a switching regulator? 
8. Why is the output choke in a buck regulator relatively large? 
2.177
HIGH-FREQUENCY 
SATURABLE REACTOR 
POWER REGULATOR 
(MAGNETIC DUTY 
RATIO CONTROL) 
21.1 INTRODUCTION
The saturable reactor regulator, otherwise referred to as the saturable-core magnetic 
regulator or magnetic pulse-width modulator, as applied to high-frequency switchmode 
power supplies, is a development of the line frequency magnetic amplifier power con-
trol technique. However, in high-frequency applications, the mode of operation is quite 
different.
As a result of advances in magnetic materials, particularly the low-loss square-loop 
field-annealed amorphous alloys, these techniques have interesting applications in high-
frequency switching regulators.
The major attraction of this method of control is that large currents at low voltages 
can be efficiently regulated. The power loss in the saturable reactor is mainly limited 
to a small resistive loss in the winding. The core loss can usually be neglected, as it 
is independent of the load current being controlled, and is usually small compared 
with the transmitted power. A further advantage is the inherent high reliability of the 
saturable reactor and its ability to provide independent isolated secondary regulation 
in multiple-output applications.
21.2 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
In simple terms, the saturable reactor is used in high-frequency switchmode supplies as a 
flux-saturation-controlled power switch, providing regulation by secondary pulse-width 
control techniques.
The method of operation is best explained by considering the conventional forward 
(buck) regulator circuit shown in Fig. 2.21.1. In this type of filter arrangement, the output 
CHAPTER 21 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested