c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf document software control project winforms azure .net UWP Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi41-part510

2.178
PART 2
voltage is related to the transformer secondary voltage (neglecting diode drops) by the 
following equation:
V
Vt
t
t
out
s on
on
off

where V
out
 output voltage 
V
s
 transformer secondary peak voltage 
t
on
 “on” time, Ms (when voltage at point A is positive)
t
off
“off” time, Ms (when voltage at point A is negative)
The ratio t
on
/(t
on
t
off
) is often referred to as the duty ratio D. It can be seen from the above 
equation that adjusting the duty ratio or input voltage will control the output voltage.
In many of the previous techniques, the width of the power pulses on the primary of 
the main transformer will be adjusted by the primary power switches to provide dynamic 
control of the output voltage. In some multiple-output buck-regulator converters, the input 
voltage to a square-wave converter (DC transformer) will be controlled so as to provide 
a fixed output voltage. In some multiple-output applications, additional regulation will be 
required on auxiliary outputs, and linear regulators will often be used even though high 
dissipation will occur.
Clearly, if some form of pulse-width control is used to provide the required regulation 
on the secondary outputs, it should be possible to obtain higher efficiency. Pulse-width con-
trol can be introduced at several positions in the secondary loop. In Fig. 2.21.2, for example, 
a switch S1 has been introduced in the secondary circuit at point A.
FIG. 2.21.1 Typical secondary output rectifier and filter circuit of a 
duty-cycle-controlled forward converter. 
FIG. 2.21.2  Output filter, showing duty  cycle (pulse width) secondary control 
switch S1 in series with the rectifier diode D1.
This switch may be operated in synchronism with the applied power pulses to further 
reduce the pulse width applied to the output filter L1, C1. This reduction in pulse width 
may be achieved by either switching off the power pulse early, thus removing the trailing 
edge of the power pulse, or switching on the power pulse late, thus removing the leading 
edge of the power pulse. In either case, the effective pulse width to the output filter will be 
Delete pages pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf reader; cut pages from pdf online
Delete pages pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add or remove pages from pdf; delete page in pdf online
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTORPOWER REGULATOR
2.179
reduced, and by applying dynamic control to this switch, output regulation can be obtained 
at a lower output voltage.
If the switch and other components have very low loss, then the efficiency of this 
method of power control will be high. To achieve this, the switch must be nearly perfect. 
That is, it needs near-zero “on”-state resistance, very high “off”-state resistance, and low 
switching losses.
Clearly, the switch in Fig. 2.21.2 could be replaced with any device that provides suit-
able switching action. Some examples would be power FETs, SCRs, triacs, or transistors 
(e.g., Bisyn, a power FET designed for synchronous switching). However, all these devices 
have relatively high losses at high output currents. The following section describes a mag-
netic reactor (choke), which will be considered “on” when saturated and “off” when not 
saturated.
21.3 THE SATURABLE REACTOR POWER 
REGULATOR PRINCIPLE
Consider what would be required from a magnetic reactor to make it behave like a good 
magnetic on-off switch. It must have a high effective impendence in its “off” state (non-
saturated state), and low effective impendence in its “on” state (saturated state). Also, it 
must be able to switch rapidly between these two states with low loss. These properties can 
be obtained from the saturable magnetic reactor, if the correct core material is used.
Consider the B/H characteristic for a hypothetical, near ideal, square-loop magnetic 
material, as shown in Fig. 2.21.3.
FIG. 2.21.3 B/H loop of an “ideal” saturable core for pulse-width modulation. 
This near-square magnetization characteristic has the following properties:
1. In the nonsaturated state (points S2 and S3), the characteristic is vertical, showing neg-
ligible change in H (current change) for the full excursion of $B (applied volt-seconds); 
that is, the permeability is very high. An inductor wound on such a core would have 
nearly infinite inductance. Hence, provided that the core is not allowed to saturate, 
negligible current would pass. (The reactor would be in its “off” state and would make 
a good low-loss “off” switch.) 
2. Now consider the core in a saturated state (at, say, point S1 on the characteristic). The 
B/H characteristic in this area is nearly horizontal, so that a negligible change in B will 
result with a large change in H; that is, the permeability is near zero, and the inductance 
is near zero. The impedance will be very close to the resistance of the winding, only a 
few milliohms. In this state the reactor presents very little impedance to the current flow. 
(It is now in its “on” state and makes an efficient “on” switch.) 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages android; delete page from pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pdf pages acrobat
2.180
PART 2
Since the area of the ideal B/H loop is negligible, very little energy is lost as the B/H loop is 
traversed. Consequently, this ideal core may be switched between the “on” and “off” states 
at high frequency, and the losses will be very small.
It now remains to see how the core may be switched between these two states. 
21.4 THE SATURABLE REACTOR POWER 
REGULATOR APPLICATION 
Consider a reactor wound on a core of ideal square-loop material and fitted in series 
with output rectifier diode D1 (position A in Fig. 2.21.1). This gives the circuit shown 
in Fig. 2.21.4.
FIG. 2.21.4 Single-winding saturable reactor regulator with simple voltage-controlled 
reset transistor Q1.
In the circuit shown in Fig. 2.21.4, assume that the core is unsaturated at a point S3 
on the B/H characteristic shown in Fig. 2.21.5. When the start of the secondary winding 
of T1 goes positive, D1 will conduct, and a voltage will be impressed across the winding 
SR of the saturable reactor. The applied volt-seconds increases the flux density B from S3 
toward positive saturation, as shown by the dashed line. Provided that the “on” period is 
short, the change in flux density $B is small, and the core will not saturate; B moves to, 
say, a point level with S2. Hence, only a small magnetization and core loss current will 
flow into the output. (The area of the B/H loop has been exaggerated for clarity.)
If Q1 is conducting during the “off” state (secondary voltage of T1 reversed), then the 
core will be reset to point S3, and for the next power pulse, the same small B/H loop will be 
followed. Hence, the only current allowed through to the output load will be the magnetiza-
tion and loss current of the reactor (which is very small compared with the load).
If, on the other hand, the core was not reset after the first forward voltage pulse (Q1 
turned off), then the core will have reset to a point on the H  0 line level with S2. Now 
the second forward voltage pulse will take the core from point S2 into saturation, along the 
dashed line to, say, point S1 on the B/H characteristic. The impedance of the reactor will 
now be very low, and a large current can flow via D1 and L1 into the output capacitor and 
load during the remainder of this second pulse.
If Q1 remains off, then at the end of the second pulse, when the current in the second-
ary of T1 and the saturable reactor falls to zero, the core will return to its remanence value 
(B
r
on the B/H characteristic). The rectifier diode D1 prevents any reversal of current in 
the reactor winding, and there will not be a reverse reset action.
Hence, at the beginning of the third and subsequent “on” periods, only a very small 
increment in B (applied volt-seconds), from B
r
to B
s
, is required to saturate the core. Hence 
only a very short forward volt-seconds stress is required to take the core back into saturation 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Create the new document with 3 pages. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages from pdf preview; delete blank page from pdf
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTORPOWER REGULATOR
2.181
at S1. With the ideal core material, the slope (permeability) of the characteristic in the satu-
rated area (point S1) will be near zero, and the inductance is negligible.
Hence, after initial switch-on, only two forward polarization pulses were required 
to make the saturable reactor look like a magnetic switch in its “on” state. All the time 
it remains in this state, it presents very little impedance to the flow of forward (output) 
current. It introduces only a slight winding resistance and gives a short delay to the lead-
ing edge of the applied pulse, as the core is incremented from B
r
to B
s
with each pulse. 
Hence, this ideal saturable reactor may be made to behave like a magnetic on-off switch 
by either resetting or not resetting the flux density level before the beginning of each 
“on” pulse.
In practice, the core will normally be reset between pulses to some intermediate point 
between S3 and B
r
on the B/H characteristic. Consequently, when the next forward voltage 
pulse is applied, there will be a delay in the current flow while the core is taken from its 
nonsaturated point (say S2 on the characteristic) into a saturated state. At saturation the 
core switches to its low-impedance “on” state, and the remainder of the power pulse will 
be allowed through to the output circuit.
In this type of circuit, it is only possible to reduce the effective pulse width and hence 
reduce the output voltage. The forward current pulse is made narrower by presetting the 
flux density further down the B/H characteristic. By using Q1 to give a controlled reset dur-
ing the “off” period (when the secondary voltage of T1 is reversed), the output voltage can 
be controlled to some lower value. (The reset increases the delay applied to leading edge of 
the power pulse, as shown in Fig. 2.21.6.) 
For a given core size, the time taken to bring the core from, say, S3 on Fig. 2.21.5 to 
saturation (the leading-edge delay) will be defined by the number of turns, the applied 
FIG.  2.21.5 Saturable reactor core  magnetization  curves, showing two  reset 
examples S2 and S3.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Create the new document with 3 pages. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" newDoc.Save(outputFilePath).
delete a page from a pdf; cut pages from pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
delete page from pdf preview; delete blank pages in pdf
2.182
PART 2
voltage, and the required flux density increment (the change in $B from the reset value to 
the saturated value), as defined by Faraday’s law: 
t
N BA
V
d
e
s

$
where t
d
 delay time, Ms
N turns
$B  preset flux density change S3 to B
s
, T 
A
e
 area of core, mm2
V
s
 secondary voltage 
21.5 SATURABLE REACTOR QUALITY FACTORS
The effectiveness of the saturable reactor as a power switch will be determined by several 
factors as follows:
Controlling Factors as an “Off” Switch.
The magnetization current can be considered a leakage current in the “off” state of the 
switch. The reactor’s quality as an “off” switch—that is, its maximum impedance—will 
be defined by its maximum inductance. This in turn depends on the permeability of the 
core in the unsaturated state and the number of turns. Increasing the number of turns will, 
of course, increase the inductance and reduce the magnetization current. However, large 
numbers of turns will increase the copper losses and minimum turn-on delay, degrading the 
performance as an “on” switch.
FIG. 2.21.6 Secondary current waveforms with saturable reactor fitted.
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete pdf pages in preview
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete page on pdf reader; reader extract pages from pdf
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTORPOWER REGULATOR
2.183
Controlling Factors as an “On” Switch.
The reactor’s quality as an “on” switch will depend on the resistance of the winding, the 
residual inductance in the saturated state, and the minimum turn-on delay time.
1. Minimum Resistance. A low resistance indicates a minimum number of turns and maxi-
mum wire gauge, which is in conflict with the “off” requirement (above) for maximum 
inductance. Hence, the actual choice of turns must be a compromise.
2. Minimum Inductance. Some magnetic materials still exhibit considerable permeability 
in the “saturated” state. This limits the minimum inductance and maximum let-through 
current. In the “on” state, the minimum impendence is required, and reducing the number 
of turns and using a very square loop core with low postsaturation permeability improves 
this parameter.
3. Minimum Turn-On Delay. This is the inevitable delay on the leading edge of the current 
pulse, caused by the need to take the core from the residual flux level B
r
to the saturated 
level B
s
when there is no reset (the “on” state).
For a defined core, number of turns, and operating voltage, the minimum turn-on 
delay time is controlled by the B
r
/B
s
ratio of the core material. During the “off” period, 
provided that there is no reset current, the flux density in the core will return to its 
residual value B
r
. When the next power pulse is applied, there is an inevitable delay in 
reactor conduction as the flux density increments from B
r
to B
s
at point S1 on Fig. 2.21.5. 
This minimum undesirable delay may be calculated from the previous equation if B
sat
and B
r
are known. 
Because of the delay, the maximum width of the current pulse let through to the output 
filter will be narrower than the applied secondary voltage pulse, and some of the control 
range will be lost. It should be noticed from the previous equation that the delay time is 
proportional to the number of turns, while inductance is proportional to the number of 
turns squared.
Although it is possible to reduce the turn-on delay by prebiasing the core into its satu-
rated state with a control winding, generally it is not economical to use the control power 
in this way. 
Once again, the ideal solution is a very square loop material with a B
r
/B
s
ratio close to 1.
4. Power Loss. At a fixed frequency, the power loss depends on two factors, copper loss 
and core loss.
First, the copper loss is controlled by the size of the wire and the number of turns, 
and this loss decreases as the core gets larger. Second, the core loss gets larger as the 
core size and control range get larger. Hence, as in transformers, the core size is a com-
promise choice. However, because of the high cost of the core material, the smallest 
practical core size is often selected, even if this does not give the smallest overall power 
loss. (The copper loss will be large.)
21.6 SELECTING SUITABLE CORE MATERIALS
The ideal core material would match the ideal B/H characteristic shown in Fig. 2.21.3 as 
closely as possible. That is, it would exhibit high permeability in the nonsaturated state 
(values from 10,000 to 200,000 are possible), and the saturated permeability and hysteresis 
losses would be very low.
2.184
PART 2
To minimize the turn-on delay, the squareness ratio B
r
/B
s
should be as high as pos-
sible (values between 0.85 and 0.95 are realizable). The hysteresis and eddy-current 
losses should be small to minimize core loss and allow high-frequency operation—
remember, in this application, the flux density swing is large. Square-loop materials 
are now available that have usable square-loop magnetic parameters and acceptable 
losses up to 100 kHz. Unfortunately, most manufacturers do not quote the saturated 
permeability of their cores, and no standards are available; hence some research in this 
area is necessary.
For low-frequency operation, up to, say, 30 kHz, suitable materials will be found in 
the grain-oriented, cold-rolled, field-annealed Permalloys and Mumetals. These materials 
are nickel-iron alloys available in tape-wound toroidal form for maximum permeability 
and best squareness ratios. Magnetic field annealing will improve the squareness ratio.
For higher-frequency applications, up to, say, 75 kHz, amorphous nickel-cobalt alloys 
are more suitable. At the time of writing, efficient operation much above 50 kHz is not 
possible with these materials because of their excessive core loss and modified pulse mag-
netization characteristics. However, rapid improvements are being made.
For higher frequencies, square-loop ferrite materials are more suitable.
Some of the core materials found most suitable for this application are listed in 
Table 2.21.1.
21.7 CONTROLLING THE SATURABLE REACTOR
As explained in Sec. 21.2, to control the saturable reactor in switching regulator applica-
tions, it is necessary to reset the core during the “off” period to a defined position on the 
B/H characteristic prior to the next forward power pulse.
The reset (volt-seconds), may be applied by a separate control winding (transductor 
or magnetic amplifier operation; see Fig. 2.21.7) or by using the same primary power 
winding and applying a reset voltage in the opposite direction to the previous power pulse 
during the “off” period (saturable reactor operation; see Fig. 2.21.5). Although the circuits 
for these modes of operation are quite different, as far as the core is concerned the action 
is identical.
In Fig. 2.21.7, the reset is provided during the “off” period of D1—that is, when the 
drive winding has gone negative—by the reset transistor Q1, which applies a voltage to a 
separate reset winding via D2. The reset current flows from the positive output, through 
Q1, the SR reset winding, and D2, to the transformer secondary. (This secondary is negative 
during the reset period.)
The reset magnetizing ampere-turns will be equal and opposite to the previous for-
ward magnetizing ampere-turns. (This magnetizing current is shown on the leading edge 
cf the waveform in Fig. 2.21.6 and is considered leakage current as far as the perfect 
magnetic switch is concerned.) The advantage of having a separate reset winding is that 
the reset current can be reduced by increasing the turns. However, remember: forward 
and reverse volt-seconds/turn must be equal. More reset turns require more reset volts 
or more reset time.
The saturable reactor control circuit shown in Fig. 2.21.4 operates as follows.
As the output voltage tries to exceed the zener diode ZD1 voltage, Q1 will turn on, 
increasing the reset of the core. The core is reset to a position on the B/H curve that pro-
vides the correct delay on the leading edge of the next power pulse to maintain the output 
voltage constant.
Since the pulse width can only be reduced, the required output voltage must be obtained 
at a pulse width that is narrower than the normal secondary forward “on” period.
TABLE 2.21.1 Properties of Typical Square-Loop Magnetic Materials
Trade name
Squareness 
ratio B
r
/B
s
Saturation
flux density, T
Core loss, W/kg (0.002 in at 300 mT)
50 Hz
35 kHz
Curie temp, °C
Frequency
Ultraperm Z
0.91
0.8
0.01
60
400
High
Permax Z
0.94
1.25
0.06
180
520
Low
Square Permalloy 80
0.9
0.7
0.01
70
High
Mumetal
0.6
0.7
0.03
180
350
Middle
H.C.R.
0.97
1.54
0.15
60 (5 kHz)
Low
Sq. Metglass
0.5
1.6
0.1
150
Low
Vitrovac 6025
0.9
0.55
0.003
50
85*
High
Sq. Ferrite
0.9
0.4
0.01
60
High
Fair-Rite 83
High
Note: Square Metglass and Vitrovac 6025 are amorphous material.
*Maximum long-term operating temperature. (Amorphous properties degrade slowly above this temperature.)
2
.
1
8
5
2
.
1
8
6
P
A
R
T
2
I
n
F
i
g
.
2
.
2
1
.
4
,
t
h
e
r
e
s
e
t
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
i
s
a
p
p
l
i
e
d
d
i
r
e
c
t
l
y
t
o
t
h
e
m
a
i
n
w
i
n
d
i
n
g
o
f
t
h
e
s
a
t
u
r
a
b
l
e
r
e
a
c
t
o
r
.
A
m
a
j
o
r
a
d
v
a
n
t
a
g
e
o
f
t
h
i
s
a
r
r
a
n
g
e
m
e
n
t
i
s
t
h
a
t
t
h
e
r
e
s
e
t
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
f
r
o
m
Q
1
a
u
t
o
-
m
a
t
i
c
a
l
l
y
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
s
t
h
e
p
r
e
l
o
a
d
i
n
g
o
f
t
h
e
o
u
t
p
u
t
n
e
c
e
s
s
a
r
y
t
o
e
x
a
c
t
l
y
r
e
a
b
s
o
r
b
t
h
e
r
e
a
c
t
o
r
l
e
a
k
a
g
e
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
c
o
m
p
o
n
e
n
t
f
r
o
m
t
h
e
p
r
e
v
i
o
u
s
f
o
r
w
a
r
d
o
n
p
e
r
i
o
d
.
I
n
t
h
i
s
e
x
a
m
p
l
e
,
r
e
s
e
t
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
f
l
o
w
s
v
i
a
Q
1
a
n
d
d
i
o
d
e
D
2
i
n
t
o
t
h
e
m
a
i
n
w
i
n
d
i
n
g
w
h
e
n
t
h
e
t
r
a
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
s
e
c
o
n
d
a
r
y
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
i
s
n
e
g
a
t
i
v
e
.
D
i
o
d
e
D
1
i
s
r
e
v
e
r
s
e
-
b
i
a
s
e
d
(
t
u
r
n
e
d
o
f
f
)
d
u
r
i
n
g
t
h
i
s
r
e
s
e
t
a
c
t
i
o
n
.
T
h
e
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
w
a
v
e
f
o
r
m
s
a
t
p
o
i
n
t
A
w
i
t
h
a
n
d
w
i
t
h
o
u
t
t
h
e
s
a
t
u
r
a
b
l
e
r
e
a
c
t
o
r
s
a
r
e
s
h
o
w
n
i
n
F
i
g
.
2
.
2
1
.
6
.
T
h
e
e
x
c
u
r
s
i
o
n
s
o
n
t
h
e
B
/
H
l
o
o
p
f
o
r
t
w
o
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
p
u
l
s
e
-
w
i
d
t
h
c
o
n
d
i
t
i
o
n
s
a
r
e
s
h
o
w
n
i
n
F
i
g
.
2
.
2
1
.
5
.
I
t
i
s
i
m
p
o
r
t
a
n
t
t
o
n
o
t
i
c
e
a
t
t
h
i
s
p
o
i
n
t
t
h
a
t
t
h
e
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
t
a
k
e
n
d
u
r
i
n
g
t
h
e
r
e
s
e
t
t
i
n
g
o
f
t
h
e
c
o
r
e
i
s
g
i
v
e
n
b
y
t
h
e
v
a
l
u
e
o
f
t
h
e
n
e
g
a
t
i
v
e
m
a
g
n
e
t
i
z
a
t
i
o
n
f
o
r
c
e
H
r
e
q
u
i
r
e
d
t
o
t
a
k
e
t
h
e
c
o
r
e
f
r
o
m
B
r
t
o
a
p
o
i
n
t
,
s
a
y
,
S
3
o
n
t
h
e
B
/
H
c
h
a
r
a
c
t
e
r
i
s
t
i
c
.
F
o
r
a
p
a
r
t
i
c
u
l
a
r
r
e
a
c
t
o
r
a
t
a
f
i
x
e
d
i
n
p
u
t
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
,
t
h
i
s
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
i
s
e
n
t
i
r
e
l
y
c
o
n
t
r
o
l
l
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
c
o
r
e
p
a
r
a
m
e
t
e
r
s
,
n
o
t
t
h
e
c
o
n
t
r
o
l
c
i
r
c
u
i
t
o
r
l
o
a
d
.
T
h
e
p
r
e
v
i
o
u
s
f
o
r
w
a
r
d
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
(
a
n
d
h
e
n
c
e
t
h
e
l
o
a
d
p
o
w
e
r
)
d
o
e
s
n
o
t
a
f
f
e
c
t
t
h
e
v
a
l
u
e
o
f
t
h
e
r
e
s
e
t
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
,
a
s
t
h
e
c
o
r
e
a
l
w
a
y
s
r
e
t
u
r
n
s
t
o
t
h
e
s
a
m
e
r
e
m
a
n
e
n
c
e
v
a
l
u
e
B
r
w
h
e
n
t
h
e
f
o
r
w
a
r
d
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
h
a
s
f
a
l
l
e
n
t
o
z
e
r
o
.
(
W
h
e
n
t
h
e
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
i
s
z
e
r
o
,
H
m
u
s
t
b
e
z
e
r
o
.
)
H
e
n
c
e
,
i
r
r
e
s
p
e
c
t
i
v
e
o
f
t
h
e
f
o
r
w
a
r
d
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
o
r
t
h
e
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n
o
n
t
h
e
B
/
H
l
o
o
p
a
t
w
h
i
c
h
t
h
e
c
o
r
e
w
a
s
s
a
t
u
r
a
t
e
d
d
u
r
i
n
g
f
o
r
w
a
r
d
c
o
n
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
(
i
.
e
.
,
H
1
,
H
2
,
H
3
,
e
t
c
.
)
,
t
h
e
r
e
s
e
t
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
r
e
m
a
i
n
s
t
h
e
s
a
m
e
d
u
r
i
n
g
t
h
e
f
o
l
l
o
w
i
n
g
r
e
s
e
t
p
e
r
i
o
d
.
C
o
n
s
e
q
u
e
n
t
l
y
,
v
e
r
y
l
a
r
g
e
p
o
w
e
r
s
c
a
n
b
e
c
o
n
t
r