c# pdf reader table : Delete blank pages from pdf file software control cloud windows web page azure class Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi42-part511

2.188
PART 2
A single control transistor Q1 may be used to reset both reactors, as the reset current 
will be automatically routed to the correct reactor by the gating action of diodes D3 and D4 
(one diode or the other being reverse-biased during the reset).
Current limiting is provided by Q2, which turns on when the voltage across R1 exceeds 
0.6 V as a result of an overload current. Once again, current transformers may be used if 
preferred, but would be positioned in series with D1 or D2 (or in the DC path through L1 
in the case of the DC current transformer).
The push-pull technique is recommended for higher output currents, as it will consider-
ably reduce the output ripple filtering requirements.
21.10 SOME ADVANTAGES OF THE SATURABLE 
REACTOR REGULATOR
For low-voltage, high-current secondary outputs, the saturable reactor control is particu-
larly valuable. The “on”-state impedance may be very close to the resistance of the copper 
winding (a few milliohms in high-current applications). Consequently, the voltage drop 
across the reactor element will be very low in the “on” state. In the “off” state, with the 
right core material, the inductance and hence the reactance can be very high, and leakage 
current (magnetization current) is low. Consequently, very efficient duty ratio power con-
trol is possible. The reliability of the saturable reactor is very high, as it may be considered 
a passive component.
In a multiple-output application, the secondary saturable reactor regulator provides 
high-efficiency, fully independent voltage and current limit control, Further, all outputs 
may be isolated if required. The saturable reactor is indeed a powerful control tool.
21.11 SOME LIMITING FACTORS IN SATURABLE 
REACTOR REGULATORS 
The saturable reactor is not a perfect switch. Several obvious limitations, such as maximum 
and minimum “off” and “on” reactances, have already been mentioned. Some of the less 
obvious but important limitations will now be considered. 
1. Parasitic Reset. When the voltage applied to the reactor reverses during the reset period, 
the main rectifier diode D1 must block (turn off). During this blocking period, there will 
be a reverse recovery current flowing in the diode. This reverse current flows in the reactor 
winding and applies an unwanted reset action to the core; hence, the core is reset to a point 
beyond the normal remanence value B
r
(even when reset is not required). 
As a result of this spurious reset action, the minimum turn-on delay is increased, reduc-
ing the range of control. Therefore, fast diodes with low recovered charge should be chosen 
for D1 and D2. 
2. Postsaturation Permeability. The permeability in the saturated state is never zero. At 
best it will be at least that of an air-cored coil. 
At very large currents, the saturated inductance of the core may limit the current let-
through to such an extent that full output cannot be obtained. If this is a problem, then a 
larger core with fewer turns should be used. Remember, L is proportional to N2, but B is 
proportional to N/A
e
and a net reduction in the saturated inductance is obtained at the same 
Delete blank pages from pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages online; acrobat export pages from pdf
Delete blank pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete blank page in pdf online
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTORPOWER REGULATOR
2.189
working flux density by using a larger core with fewer turns. Ferrite cores, with their larger 
postsaturation permeability, are more prone to this problem. 
21.12 THE CASE FOR CONSTANT-VOLTAGE OR 
CONSTANT-CURRENT RESET (HIGH-FREQUENCY 
INSTABILITY CONSIDERATIONS) 
At high frequencies the area of the B/H loop increases, giving an increased core loss and a 
general degradation of the desirable magnetic properties.
In particular, some materials show a modification of the B/H loop to a pronounced 
S-shaped characteristic. This S shape can lead to instability if constant-current resetting is 
used in the control circuit. This effect is best understood by considering Fig. 2.21.10.
FIG. 2.21.10 High-frequency pulse magnetization B/H loop, showing S-shaped 
B/H characteristic.
If constant-current reset is used, then the magnetizing force H is the controlled param-
eter. As H is being incremented from zero to H2 during reset, an indeterminate range is 
entered between H1 and H2, in which  B will “flip” to  B because of the negative slope of 
the B/H characteristic between H2 and H1, and progressive control is lost.
In practice, a very large compliance voltage from the constant current reset circuit would 
be required to change B from  B1 to  B2 rapidly. Therefore, some measure of control is 
normally retained even with constant-current reset, since most real constant-current circuits 
have a limited compliance voltage and the control circuit reverts to a voltage-limited state 
during this part of the reset. However, this may not be a well-defined action.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#
delete page pdf online; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf file online
2.190
PART 2
For this reason, better stability will be obtained if controlled volt-seconds reset is used 
rather than constant-current reset (particularly at light loads). Voltage reset will increment 
the flux density B rather than the magnetization force H. This is more controllable in the 
negative-slope region shown in Fig. 2.21.10.
For voltage reset, a fast-slew-rate, low-output-impedance voltage-controlled amplifier 
is preferred. The decoupling capacitor C2 shown in Fig. 2.21.9 converts the current control 
of Q1 to virtual voltage control at high frequencies, but degrades the transient response and 
is a compromise solution only.
21.13 SATURABLE REACTOR DESIGN 
The most difficult design decision is the selection of core material and core size. As previ-
ously discussed, this depends on the application, frequency, and required performance. 
However, once the core selection has been made, the rest of the design procedure is 
relatively straightforward.
21.13.1 Core Material
The choice of core material is normally a compromise between cost and performance. 
At low frequencies, there are many suitable materials, and the controlling factors will be 
squareness ratio, saturation flux density, cost, and core losses. Also, at low frequencies, 
core losses are less important, giving a wider selection. At medium frequencies, up to, say, 
35 kHz, the core loss starts to be the predominant factor, and Permalloys, square ferrites, 
or amorphous materials will be chosen. At high frequencies, above 50 kHz, the core loss 
tends to become excessive, and the parameters of the cores rapidly degrade. Ferrite materi-
als are probably the best choice. (The author’s experience is limited to frequencies below 
50 kHz at this time.)
For very high frequency operation, more than 75 kHz, better results may be found using 
sine-wave converters and true magnetic amplifier techniques. Sinewave operation extends 
the useful frequency range of a material. (Many of the/core losses are proportional to rates 
of change of induction rather than to frequency per se.)
21.13.2 Core Size 
The practical requirements of the power circuit usually determine the core size. In low-
voltage, high-current applications, the reactor winding may be three or four turns of large-
gauge wire, and the practical difficulties of winding this wire on the core will determine 
the core size. In many cases the winding will be a continuation of the transformer second-
ary, and the same wire will be used. To minimize the turns on the saturable reactor, a large 
flux density excursion, typically 300 to 500 mT, will normally be used; hence the core loss 
will be relatively large compared with the copper loss for high-frequency operation. 
A typical example of the single-ended forward saturable reactor regulator will be used 
to demonstrate one design procedure. 
21.14 DESIGN EXAMPLE
Consider a requirement for a 5-V, 20-A saturable reactor to operate at 35 kHz in the single-
ended forward converter shown in Fig. 2.21.4. 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
delete blank page in pdf; delete page on pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
delete pages of pdf; delete pages from pdf online
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTORPOWER REGULATOR
2.191
21.14.1 Step 1, Select Core Material 
From Table 2.21.1, suitable materials would be Permalloy, square ferrite, or Vitrovac 6025. 
In this example, assume that cost is less important than performance, so that the best overall 
material, Vitrovac 6025 amorphous material, will be used. 
21.14.2 Step 2, Calculate the Minimum Secondary Voltage Required 
from the Converter Transformer 
The maximum “on” time is 50% of the total period, or 14.3 Ms at 35 kHz. When the 
SR is fitted, there will be an unavoidable minimum delay on the leading edge of the 
“on” pulse, as a result of the time required to take the core from B
r
to B
sat
, even when 
the reset current is zero. Previous experience with the 6025 material using fast diodes 
indicates that this delay will typically be 1.3 Ms. (The actual value can be calculated 
when the turns, core size, and secondary voltage have been established.) Therefore, 
the usable “on” period will be approximately 13 Ms. The minimum secondary voltage 
required from the converter transformer, to develop the required output voltage can now 
be calculated: 
V
V
t
t
t
s



out on
off
on
V
(
)
(
. )
513 15 6
13
11
21.14.3 Step 3, Select Core Size and Turns 
In this example, it will be assumed that the transformer secondary has been brought out as 
a flying lead, and that this wire is to be wound on to the saturable reactor core to form the 
winding. The core size is to be such that the winding will just fill the center hole. Further, it 
will be assumed that the wire size on the transformer secondary was selected for a current 
density of 310 A/cm2 and that 10 wires of 19 AWG were used. Assuming a packing factor 
of 80%, the area required for each turn will be 19.5 mm2.
The next step is an iterative process to find the optimum core size. The larger the core 
size, the smaller the number of turns required, but the larger the center hole size. 
Consider a standard Series 2 toroid, size 25–15–10. From the manufacturer’s data, this 
toroid has a core area of 50 mm2 and a center hole area of 176.6 mm2. The turns required on 
this core (if the flux density change is to be 500 mT and the core is to control to full pulse 
width) may be calculated as follows: 
N
Vt
BA
s
e


r
r

on
turns
$
11 14 3
05 50
6
.
.
where V
s
 secondary voltage
t
on
 time that forward voltage is applied, Ms
$B  flux density change, T
A
e
 core area, mm2
The area required for six turns of 10 r 19 AWG at 80% packing density is 117 mm2, and 
this will just fit the core center hole size.
At higher input voltages, the flux density excursion will be larger, but as the core can 
support a total change of 1.8 T (
ˆ
ˆ
),
B
B
to
there is an adequate flux density margin.
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
how to rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page Add and Insert a blank Page to Word File in C#. following C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf in preview
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to rotate PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page Add and Insert a blank Page to PowerPoint File in C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
delete pages on pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
2.192
PART 2
21.14.4 Step 4. Calculate Temperature Rise 
The temperature rise depends on the core and winding losses and the effective surface area 
of the wound core. The core loss of Vitrovac 6025 at 35 kHz and 500 mT is approximately 
150 W/kg. The weight of the 25 r 15 r 10 core is 17 g, so the core loss is 2.5 W. The copper 
loss is more difficult to predict, as an allowance must be made for the increase in effective 
resistance of the wire as a result of skin effect. With a multiple-filament winding of this 
type, the F
r
ratio (ratio of DC resistance to effective ac resistance) is approximately 1.2, 
giving a winding resistance of 0.0012 7 and a copper loss (I2R loss) of 0.48 W. Hence, 
the total loss is approximately 3 W. The surface area of the wound core is approximately 
40 cm2, and from Fig. 3.1.9, the temperature rise will be 55°C. Since much of the heat 
will be conducted away by the thick connection leads, the actual rise will normally be 
less than this.
21.15 PROBLEMS 
1. Explain the basic principle of the saturable reactor regulator.
2. What are the desirable core properties for saturable reactors?
3. How does the saturable reactor delay the transmission of the leading edge of a secondary 
current pulse? 
4. How is the saturation delay period adjusted? 
5. Why is the saturable reactor particularly suitable for controlling high-current outputs? 
6. Why is constant-voltage reset preferred to constant-current reset in high-frequency satu-
rable reactor regulators? 
7. Why are fast secondary rectifier diodes recommended for saturable reactor regulators? 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument.Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
delete pdf pages in reader; copy pages from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete page from pdf
2.193
CONSTANT-CURRENT 
POWER SUPPLIES 
22.1 INTRODUCTION
Most engineers will be very familiar with the general performance parameters of constant-
voltage power supplies. They will recognize that these power supplies have a limited 
power capability, normally with fixed output voltages  and some form of current- or 
power-limited protection. For example, a 10-V 10-A power supply would be expected to 
deliver from zero to 10 A at a constant output voltage of 10 V. Should the load current try 
to exceed 10 A, the supply would be expected to limit the current, with either a constant 
or a foldback characteristic. The well-known output characteristics of one such supply 
is shown in Fig. 2.22.1.
CHAPTER 22 
2.193
FIG. 2.22.1 Output characteristics of a constant-voltage power sup-
ply, showing constant-current and reentrant-current protection locus. 
22.2 CONSTANT-VOLTAGE SUPPLIES 
From Fig. 2.22.1, the output characteristics of the constant-voltage supply will be recog-
nized. The normal working range for the constant-voltage supply will be for load resis-
tances from infinity (open circuit) to 1 7. In this range, the load current is 10 A or less. The 
voltage is maintained constant at 10 V in this “working range.” 
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete pages pdf; delete page in pdf
2.194
PART 2
At load resistances of less than 1 7, the current-limited area of operation will be entered. 
In a constant-voltage supply, this is recognized as an overload condition. The output voltage 
will be decreasing toward zero as the load resistance moves toward zero (a short circuit). The 
output current is limited to some safe maximum value, but since this is normally considered 
a nonworking area, the characteristics of the current limit are not very closely specified. 
22.3 CONSTANT-CURRENT SUPPLIES
The constant-current supply is not so well known, and therefore the concept can be a little 
more difficult to grasp. In the constant-current supply, the previous constant-voltage 
characteristics are reversed. Figure 2.22.2 shows the output characteristics of a typical 
constant-current supply.
It should be noted that the controlled parameter (vertical scale) is now the output cur-
rent, and the dependent variable is the compliance voltage. The normal “working range” 
is now from zero ohms (short circuit) to 1 7, and in this load range the output current is 
maintained constant.
At load resistances in excess of 1 7, a compliance-voltage-limited protection area is 
entered. For the constant-current supply, this voltage-limited area would be considered an 
overvoltage condition. Since this is normally a nonworking protection area, the output 
voltage may not be well specified in this area.
22.4 COMPLIANCE VOLTAGE
The terms used to describe the operation of a constant-current supply are somewhat less 
familiar than those used for the constant-voltage supply. For a variable constant-current 
unit, the output current may be adjusted, normally from near zero to some maximum value 
(simply described as the constant-current range).
FIG. 2.22.2 Output characteristics of a constant-current power supply, showing constant-
voltage compliance limits. 
22. CONSTANT-CURRENT POWER SUPPLIES
2.195
To maintain the load current  constant,  the output terminal voltage must change in 
response to load resistance changes. The terminal voltage range over which the output 
current will be maintained constant is called the “compliance voltage.” This compliance 
voltage usually has a defined maximum value. 
In the example shown in Fig. 2.22.2, the compliance voltage is 10 V, and a constant cur-
rent of 10 A will be maintained into a load resistance ranging from zero to 1 7.
Constant-current supplies have limited applications. They will be used where currents 
must be maintained constant over a limited range of variation in the load resistance. Typical 
examples would be deflection and focusing coils for electron microscopes and gas spec-
trometry.
Figure 2.22.3  shows the  basic  circuit for  a  constant-current linear supply. In  this 
example, a voltage-controlled current source is shown. This is an important concept, not 
previously introduced. Just as constant-current supplies can be configured from voltage-
controlled current sources, so can constant-voltage supplies be configured from current-
controlled voltage sources. This concept has important implications for current sharing, 
when constant-voltage supplies are to be operated in parallel.
FIG. 2.22.3 Example of a constant-current linear supply (basic circuit). 
In this example, the load current returns to the supply via the low-value series resistor 
R
s
. The current analogue voltage developed across this resistor is compared with the inter-
nal reference voltage by amplifier A1, and the series regulator transistor Q1 is adjusted 
to maintain the voltage across R
s
constant. Thus the current in R
s
will be maintained 
constant, and provided that the amplifier input current is negligible, the load current will 
also be maintained constant, irrespective of load resistance, within the “compliance volt-
age range.”
It should be noted from Fig. 2.22.3 that as the load resistance increases, the voltage 
across the output terminals V
c
increases to approach the supply voltage V
b
. When V
t
V
h
,
Q1 is fully saturated and has no further control. Beyond this point, the current must start to 
fall, and the output voltage will be defined by the characteristics of the header supply V
b
,
which is not regulated and hence is not well specified in this example.
Although it is possible to reconfigure a constant-voltage supply to give constant-current 
performance, this is not recommended. To provide maximum efficiency and high perfor-
mance, the constant-current supply will have a very low reference voltage (typically less 
than 100 mV), the internal current shunt must be highly stable, and internal current paths 
must be well defined. 
2.196
PART 2
22.5 PROBLEMS
1. How do the general performance parameters of a constant-current power supply differ 
from those of a constant-voltage power supply? 
2. What is the meaning of the term “compliance voltage” in a constant-current supply?
3. What would be considered an overload condition for a constant-current supply? Compare 
this with a constant-voltage supply. 
4. Why is the output ripple and noise voltage a meaningless parameter for a constant-
current supply? 
5. How should output ripple and noise be defined in a constant-current supply? 
2.197
VARIABLE LINEAR 
POWER SUPPLIES
23.1 INTRODUCTION
The variable linear power supply, although perhaps somewhat out of place in a switching
power supply book, has been included here for several reasons. 
First of all, when very low output noise is required, the linear regulator is still the best 
technique available. Also, the “cascaded” linear system described here is a very useful and 
somewhat neglected technique. Finally, the high dissipation and low efficiency of the dissi-
pative linear regulator serve to illustrate the advantages of the switchmode variable supply, 
described in the next chapter.
In this section, we review the basic concepts of a linear variable supply for labora-
tory applications. The same general principles will apply to fixed-voltage linear regulators, 
except that for the latter the losses would normally be much lower. 
To its advantage, the linear regulator has inherently low noise levels, usually measured 
in microvolts rather than the more familiar millivolts of switchmode systems. For applica-
tions in which the minimum electrical noise levels are essential (for example, sensitive 
communications equipment and research and development activities), the advantage of 
the very low noise levels of the dissipative linear regulator often outweighs the wish for 
maximum efficiency.
The transient response of a well-designed linear system may be of the order of 20 Ms for 
full recovery, rather than the 500 Ms for the typical switchmode regulator. 
The major disadvantage of the linear regulator is that it must dissipate as heat the power 
difference between the used output power (volt-amperes) and the internally generated volt-
amperes. This dissipation can be very large. It is largest at high output currents and low 
output voltages.
In the example to be considered here (a 60-V, 2-A variable supply), the unregulated 
header voltage will be 70 V minimum. When the variable output voltage is set to zero at 
2 A load (an output short circuit), normal series regulator dissipation would be 140 W mini-
mum. If this energy is all concentrated in series linear regulator transistors, then expensive 
heat sinks and transistors will be required. 
The following section describes a method of secondary preregulation which allows the 
majority of the unwanted energy to be dissipated in passive resistors rather than in the series 
regulator transistors. Dissipating the energy in resistors has major advantages. It should be 
remembered that good-quality wirewound resistors are much more efficient at dissipat-
ing the unwanted energy, since they may run at much higher surface temperatures than 
semiconductor devices can. Hence smaller air flow can efficiently carry away the excess 
heat. Resistors are also much lower in cost than extra regulation transistors and heat sinks. 
CHAPTER 23 
2.197
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested