c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf online control Library utility azure .net winforms visual studio Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi46-part515

2.228
PART 2
Hence, as a result of the change from complete to incomplete energy transfer below 
30 V, the power curve is somewhat reduced if the peak primary current is limited to 9.2 A. 
However, a very useful 20-A output current is still available at the lower output voltages. 
It is recommended that a primary current limit always be used with this type of supply. It 
reduces the high current stress that would normally apply to both input and output circuits, 
if the lower constant power curve is maintained at the lower output voltages. 
The remainder of the transformer design, i.e., selection of wire sizes and general design 
parameters, will be very similar to that of the flyback transformers shown in Chap 2., 
except that the secondary must be rated for the higher current of 20 A. Part 3, Chap. 4 
covers general design and wire selection. 
25.1.9 Final Transformer Specification 
Core size
PM 87 
Center pole area A
cp
 700 mm2
Operating frequency
 21 kHz 
Total period
 45 Ms
Maximum “on” period
 33.3% (15 Ms)
Minimum primary volts  280 V DC 
Optimum flux density
 0.15 T 
Primary turns
 42 
Secondary turns
 9 
25.2 VARIABLE-FREQUENCY MODE 
If the minimum “on” pulse width is limited to 1 Ms, it can be shown (by the same methods 
as used above) that the maximum input power at the limiting input current of 9.2 A will 
be 57 W. 
This limiting power condition will occur at very low output voltages, but the limiting 
output current will still be 20 A. Hence the internal losses will be large (say 30 W). If the 
output power falls below, say, 27 W at low output voltages, the power must be further 
reduced, and the system reverts to a variable-frequency mode. 
At high output voltages, with complete energy transfer, the maximum input power for 
a l-Ms period will be only 1.9 W. Hence, constant-frequency operation will be maintained 
down to this much lower power level at higher voltages. Figure 2.24.1 shows the area of 
variable-frequency operation. 
25.3 PROBLEMS 
1. The switchmode variable supply may replace two or three linear variable supplies in the 
same power range. Why is this? 
2. Why is the flyback technique particularly suitable for switchmode variable supplies? 
3. Why is constant-frequency operation abandoned at low output powers in the variable 
switchmode supply? 
4. Why is the output power at low output voltages somewhat less than that at high output 
voltages? 
Delete pages pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy page from pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
Delete pages pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pages on pdf file
P
L
A
L
R
L
T
L
3
APPLIED DESIGN
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page on pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
cut pages from pdf preview; delete pdf pages in reader
This page intentionally left blank 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page from pdf file online
3.3
INDUCTORS AND CHOKES 
IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES 
The following types of wound components (inductors and chokes) are covered in this 
chapter: 
1.2 Simple inductors (no DC current) 
1.3    Common-mode  line-filter inductors  (special dual-wound  inductors that  carry 
large but balanced line frequency currents) 
1.7    Series-mode line-filter inductors (inductors which carry large and unbalanced
line frequency currents) 
1.8 Chokes (inductors with a large DC bias current wound on gapped ferrite cores) 
1.12   Rod chokes (chokes wound on ferrite or iron powder rods) 
The derivation of magnetic equations and the development of nomograms are shown in 
Appendixes 3.A, 3.B, and 3.C. 
1.1 INTRODUCTION 
For the purpose of this discussion, the term “inductors” will be reserved for wound 
components that do not carry a DC current, and the term “chokes” will be used for 
wound components which carry a large DC bias current, with relatively small ac ripple 
currents. 
The design and materials used for a wound component can vary considerably depend-
ing on the application. Further, the design process tends to be iterative; a number of inter-
active but often divergent variables must be reconciled. 
The engineer who fully masters all the theoretical and practical requirements for the 
optimum design of the various wound components used in switchmode supplies has a rare 
and valuable design skill. 
The design approach used here will depend on the application. The final design often 
tends to be a compromise, with emphasis being placed on minimum cost, minimum size, 
or minimum loss. Since the optimum conditions for these three major requirements are 
divergent, a compromise choice will often have to be made. The designer’s task is to obtain 
the best compromise. 
In switchmode applications, inductors (no DC bias) will normally be confined to low-
pass filters used in the supply line. Here, their function is to prevent the conduction of 
high-frequency noise back into the supply lines. For this application, high core perme-
ability would normally be regarded as an advantage. 
CHAPTER 1 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages android
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages in preview; delete a page from a pdf reader
3.4
PART 3
Chokes (inductors that carry a large DC bias current) will be found in high-frequency 
power output filters and continuous-mode buck-boost converter “transformers.” In such 
applications, low permeability and low high-frequency core loss would normally be con-
sidered advantages. 
To minimize the number of turns and hence reduce copper loss, it might have been 
assumed that a high-permeability core material with a low core loss would be the most 
desirable. Unfortunately, in choke design, the large DC current component and the limited 
saturation flux density of real magnetic materials force the selection of a low-permeability 
material or the introduction of an air gap in the core. However, as a result of the low effec-
tive permeability, more turns are needed to obtain the required inductance. Hence, in choke 
design, the desired low copper loss and high efficiency are compromised by the need to 
support a large DC current. 
1.2 SIMPLE INDUCTORS 
In power supply applications, pure inductors (those that do not carry a DC component 
or a forced high-current ac component) are rare. Since the design of such inductors 
is relatively straightforward since the inductance may be obtained directly from the 
A
L
value provided for the core because no gap is required, apart from the common 
mode filter inductors described below, their design will not be covered here. However, 
remember that the inductance increases as N2. Therefore. Al may be given for one turn 
(as in the following equation) or for many turns in which case normalize the Al value 
to a single turn by dividing by the given turns squared.
L N A
L

2
1.3 COMMON-MODE LINE-FILTER INDUCTORS 
Figure 3.1.1a shows a balanced line filter typical of those used to meet the conducted-mode 
RFI noise rejection limits in direct-off-line switchmode supplies. It shows two separate induc-
tors, L1(a) and L1(b), which are wound on a single core to form a dual-wound common-mode 
line-filter inductor. Also shown is L2, which is a single-wound series-mode inductor. 
Typical  examples  of  dual-wound  common-mode  filter inductors  are  shown  in 
Fig. 3.1.1b and c.
The common-mode filter inductor has two isolated windings with the same number of 
turns. The windings are connected into the circuit in such a way that the two windings are 
in antiphase for series-mode line frequency currents. Hence, the magnetic field that results 
from the normal series-mode ac (or even DC) supply currents will cancel to zero.
When the two windings are connected in this way, the only inductance presented to series-
mode currents will be the leakage inductance between the two windings. Hence the low-frequency
line current will not saturate the core, and a high-permeability material may be used without 
the need for a core air gap. Thus a large inductance can be obtained with few turns. 
However, for common-mode noise (noise currents  or voltages  that appear on both 
lines at the same time with respect to the ground plane), the two windings are in parallel 
and in phase, and a very high inductance is presented to common-mode currents. Hence 
common-mode noise currents are bypassed to the ground plane by capacitors C1 and C2. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete pages of pdf
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.5
FIG. 3.1.1 (a) Line input filter for reduction of SMPS common- and differential-mode conducted 
noise. (b) and (c) Typical examples of common-mode line-filter inductors. (d) Typical series-mode 
line-filter choke using low-permeability high-loss iron dust toroidal core.
3.6
PART 3
This  arrangement  prevents any significant  common-mode  interference  currents  from 
being conducted back to the input supply lines. 
1.3.1 Basic Design Example of a Common-Mode Line-Filter Inductor (Wound 
on an E Core) 
In this example, it will be assumed that the maximum common-mode inductance is required 
from a specified core size, using a high-permeability ferrite E core. The effective DC or 
low-frequency ac current in the core is zero as a result of using two equal opposed and bal-
anced windings, as shown in Fig. 3.1.1a. Very often, in the design of common-mode line-
filter inductors, the designer will simply choose to obtain the maximum possible inductance 
at the working current from a particular core size, chosen to meet the size needs (consistent, 
of course, with acceptable performance, power loss, and temperature rise). 
When this approach is used, core loss is assumed to be negligible, and bobbins will be 
completely filled with a gauge of wire that will just give a copper loss that will result in an 
acceptable temperature rise at the maximum working current. Although with this design 
approach the number of turns and the interwinding capacitance may be quite large, giv-
ing a low self-resonant frequency, the low-frequency inductance and noise rejection will 
be maximized for the core size. Moreover, the higher-frequency components can often be 
more effectively blocked by the series-mode inductor L2, which would normally have a 
high self-resonant frequency. 
If this design approach is chosen, and a ferrite E core is to be used, then the design steps 
discussed in the following sections should be followed. 
1.3.2 Core Size 
Select a core size that suits the mechanical size requirement, calculate the “area product”
(AP), and refer to the core area product graph, Fig. 3.1.2, to obtain the thermal resistance 
R
th
of the finished inductor. 
AP
A A
cp wb

cm
4
Note: The area product is the product of the core area and the usable winding window area 
(one side of the E core on bobbin; see Appendix 3.A; an example of the use of Fig. 3.1.2 
is given in Sect. 1.4). 
1.3.3 Winding Dissipation 
Calculate the permitted winding dissipation P that will just give an acceptable temperature
rise $T. Then obtain the winding resistance R
w
, at the working (rms) current I. Assume 
zero core loss.
P
T
R
th

$
W
and
R
P
I
w

2
7
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.7
From this permitted maximum resistance (of the fully wound bobbin), the wire gauge, 
turns, and inductance can be established by one of the methods discussed in the following 
sections.
1.3.4 Establish Wire Size, Turns, and Inductance 
Many manufacturers provide information on the resistance and maximum number of turns 
of a fully wound bobbin using various wire gauges. Also, the A
L
factors for cores are often 
FIG. 3.1.2 Nomogram for establishing the area product (and hence the size) for chokes in ferrite material, 
as a function of DC load current and inductance, with thermal resistance as a parameter. 
3.8
PART 3
provided, from which the inductance can be calculated. Because balanced windings are 
used, there is no need for an air gap. 
In some cases a nomogram is available, from which the wire gauge, turns, and resistance 
of the wound component can be read directly. (A good example is shown in Fig. 3.1.3. and 
an application is shown in Sec. 1.4.) 
If the above information is not available for the chosen bobbin, then the turns, gauge, 
and resistance may be calculated from the basic core data. (See Appendix 3.B.) 
FIG. 3.1.3 Nomogram for establishing the wire size for chokes in ferrite material, as a function of turns 
and core size, with resistance as a parameter. 
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.9
An inductor wound following the preceding simple steps provides the maximum induc-
tance possible on the selected core size, at the maximum rated current and selected tem-
perature rise. The finished choke will look much like the example shown in Fig. 3.1.1c.
1.4 DESIGN EXAMPLE OF A COMMON-MODE 
LINE-FILTER INDUCTOR (USING A FERRITE E 
CORE AND GRAPHICAL DESIGN METHOD) 
Assume that an EC35 core is to be used to provide the maximum inductance for a common-
mode line-filter inductor, with a temperature rise not to exceed 30°C at an input current 
of 5 A rms. 
The area product for the EC35 is 0.7 (when a bobbin is used). Entering the left side of 
Fig. 3.1.2 with AP  0.7 gives the thermal resistance 20°C / W (at the top of the nomogram). 
Hence the dissipation permitted for a temperature rise $T of 30°C will be 
P
T
R
th

$


30
20
1.5 W
At a current of 5 A rms, the maximum resistance is related to power by 
I R P
2

Hence
R

15
25
006
.
. 7
From the nomogram shown in Fig. 3.1.3, the maximum number of turns to give a resistance 
of 0.06 7 on the EC35 core can be established as follows: 
Find the required resistance (0.06 7) on the top horizontal scale of resistance. (An 
example is shown at top left.) Project down to the upper (positively sloping) “resistance 
and turns” lines for the EC35, as shown in the example. The intersection with the EC35 
line is projected left to give the number of turns (56 in this example). From the same point, 
project right to the intersection with the negatively sloping “wire gauge and turns” line for 
the EC35 core. This point is then projected down to the lower scale as shown to give the 
wire gauge (approximately #17 AWG in this example). 
In a common-mode inductor, the winding will be split into two equal parts. Hence the 
EC35 bobbin would be wound with two windings, each of 28 turns of #17 AWG. 
Note: For resistance values of less than 50 m7, enter the graph from the bottom scale of 
resistance and project up to the lower group of “resistance and turns” lines. For example, 
assume that a winding of 40 m7 is required on an EF25 core. Enter the graph from the 
lower 40-m7 scale and project up to the EF25 “resistance and turns” line. Project left to 
give the total number of turns (34 in this example). The intersection of this turns line with 
the “wire gauge and turns” line for the EF25 core is then projected down to give the gauge 
(#17 AWG again in this example). Hence two windings, each of 17 turns of #17 AWG, 
would be used. 
For applications not covered by the nomogram, the winding parameters may be calcu-
lated as shown in Appendixes 3.A and 3.B.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested