c# pdf reader table : Delete page from pdf SDK Library service wpf asp.net winforms dnn Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi48-part517

3.20
PART 3
In this example, 
A
w
 138 mm2 (EC41)
K
u
 0.6 (for round wire)
N  37
Hence
A
x

r
¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´

138 0 6
37
15
1 2
.
.
/
mm
2
giving a wire size of #15 AWG (which is close to the size #14 established by the nomogram 
method).
1.10.5 Step 5, Calculate Core Gap 
If it is assumed that most of the reluctance will be in the air gap (the normal case), then 
the approximate air gap length l
g
, neglecting fringe effects, will be given by the following 
formula:
I
N
A
L
g
r
e

ʉ
M M
0
2
1
10
where l
g
 total air gap, mm 
μ
0
 4P r 10 7
μ
r
 1 (for air) 
N  turns 
A
e
 area of center pole, cm2
L  inductance, H
In this example,
N  37
A
e
 106 r 10 2
L  90 r 10 6
Hence
I
g

r
r
r
r
r
r

4
37
106 10
90 10
7
2
2
6
P 10
0.1
1.74 mm
For a minimum external magnetic field, the gap should be confined to the center pole only. 
However, with this type of inductor, when the ripple current component is small, the gap 
may extend right across the core, and the radiation will not be excessive. The majority of 
any remaining external field may be effectively eliminated by fitting a copper screen as 
shown in Fig 1.4.5. 
With the EC core, the area of the center pole is less than the sum of the outer legs, and 
if the gap extends right across the core, then the effective leg gap will be reduced by this 
ratio. In any event, because of the neglected core permeability and fringe effects, some 
adjustment of the air gap may be necessary to obtain optimum results. 
Delete page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf reader; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf online; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.21
1.10.6 Step 6, Check Temperature Rise 
The temperature rise will depend mainly on the total power loss (core loss plus copper 
loss), the surface area and emissivity, and the air flow. In the interest of simplicity, a num-
ber of second-order effects have been neglected in the design procedure. These neglected 
effects will only result in a small error in the final calculated temperature rise. In any 
event, the temperature of the choke should be checked finally in the working prototype, 
where the layout and thermal design will also introduce additional “difficult to determine” 
thermal effects. 
The preceding graphical design approach assumed that the core loss using ferrite cores 
would be negligible. This may be verified as follows. 
1.10.7 Step 7, Check Core Loss
The core loss is made up of eddy-current and hysteresis losses, both of which increase 
with frequency and flux excursion. The loss factor depends on the material and is pro-
vided in the material specifications. Usually the published graphs assume a symmetrical 
flux density excursion about zero (push-pull operation), so the indicated B
max
is only half 
$B peak-to-peak. For first-quadrant buck and boost chokes and flyback applications, the 
calculated $B peak-to-peak should be divided by 2 to enter the graphs and obtain the 
core loss. 
In the preceding example, the ac flux density excursion is given by 
$
B 
e t
NA
e
ac
off
where $B
ac
 ac flux density swing, T
|e|  output voltage plus diode drop, V
t
off
 “off” time, μs
N  turns
A
e
 area of core, mm2
For the above example,
|e|  5.6 V
t
off
 32 μs
N  37
A
e
 106 mm2
Hence B
ac
is
B
ac
mT

r
r

56 32
37 106
46
.
With a typical ferrite material, at this flux density and a frequency of 20 kHz, the core 
loss will be less than 1 mW/g (see Fig. 2.13.4), giving a total core loss of 26 mW with 
the EC41 core (a negligible loss). Hence, with ferrite material, core loss will not be sig-
nificant, except for high-frequency and large-ripple-current applications. 
Much greater losses will be found with powdered iron cores, and it may not be possible 
to neglect the core loss with these materials. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete a page from a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete page from pdf acrobat
3.22
PART 3
1.10.8 Step 8, Check Copper Loss 
The DC resistance of the wound choke can be obtained from the bobbin manufacturer’s 
information, or it may be calculated using the mean diameter of the wound bobbin, turns, 
and wire size. In any event, it should finally be measured, as winding stress and pack-
ing factor will depend on the winding technique, and will affect the overall resistance. 
Remember, the resistance of copper will increase approximately 0.43%/ °C from its value 
at 20°C. This makes it 34% higher at 100°C.
The copper power loss is given by I2R. (Since the ripple current is small, the skin effects 
are negligible, and the mean DC current and DC resistance can be used with little error.) 
Hence
Powerloss
W
I R
2
In this example,
I
I


10
100
2
A
and
The length of the winding, and hence the resistance, may be established from the mean 
diameter of the bobbin and the number of turns, as follows: 
Mean diameterofEC41 bobbin
cm
d
m
2
Total length of wire
cm
l
d N
t
m
P
Therefore
l
t
P r r

2 37 233 cm
From Table 3.1.1, the resistance of #14 AWG wire is between 83 M7 /cm at 20°C and 
111 M7 /cm at 100°C, giving a total resistance between 19.3 and 25.8 m 7.
Hence the power loss I2R will be between 1.9 and 2.58 W.
From Table 2.19.1, the thermal resistance of the EC41 is 15.5°C/W, giving a tempera-
ture rise of between 29.5 and 40°C, depending on the ambient (starting) temperature.
1.10.9 Step 9, Check Temperature Rise (Graphical Method) 
The graphical area product design approach using Fig. 3.1.3 should result in a temperature
rise of 30°C in free air. 
A further design check may be made by obtaining the thermal resistance from Fig. 3.1.2. 
With this, the temperature rise may be calculated and confirmed. 
Entering the graph once again with 37 turns, the second intercept with the EC41 resis-
tance and turns core line gives a wound resistance at 100°C of 21.5 m7 (lower scale).
The power loss I2R is 2.15 W. The thermal resistance of the EC41, from Fig. 3.1.2, is 
15°C/W. Hence the temperature rise $T will be 
$ 

r

n
T
R P
th
15 2 15 32 2
.
. C
giving a working temperature of 52°C, at an ambient temperature of 20°C.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages pdf preview; delete page pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; add and delete pages in pdf online
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.23
TABLE 3.1.1 AWG Winding Data (Copper Wire, Heavy Insulation) 
AWG
Diameter, 
copper, 
cm
Area,
copper, 
cm2
Diameter, 
insulation,
cm
Area,
insulation,
cm2
7/cm
20°C
7 /cm 
100°C
A for 
450
A/cm2
10
.259
.052620
.273
.058572
.000033
.000044
23.679
11
.231
.041729
.244
.046738
.000041
.000055
18.778
12
.205
.033092
.218
.037309
.000052
.000070
14.892
13
.183
.026243
.195
.029793
.000066
.000088
11.809
14
.163
.020811
.174
.023800
.000083
.000111
9.365
15
.145
.016504
.156
.019021
.000104
.000140
7.427
16
.129
.013088
.139
.015207
.000132
.000176
5.890
17
.115
.010379
.124
.012164
.000166
.000222
4.671
18
.102
.008231
.111
.009735
.000209
.000280
3.704
19
.091
.006527
.100
.007794
.000264
.000353
2.937
20
.081
.005176
.089
.006244
.000333
.000445
2.329
21
.072
.004105
.080
.005004
.000420
.000561
1.847
22
.064
.003255
.071
.004013
.000530
.000708
1.465
23
.057
.002582
.064
.003221
.000668
.000892
1.162
24
.051
.002047
.057
.002586
.000842
.001125
.921
25
.045
.001624
.051
.002078
.001062
.001419
.731
26
.040
.001287
.046
.001671
.001339
.001789
.579
27
.036
.001021
.041
.001344
.001689
.002256
.459
28
.032
.000810
.037
.001083
.002129
.002845
.364
29
.029
.000642
.033
.000872
.002685
.003587
.289
30
.025
.000509
.030
.000704
.003386
.004523
.229
31
.023
.000404
.027
.000568
.004269
.005704
.182
32
.020
.000320
.024
.000459
.005384
.007192
.144
33
.018
.000254
.022
.000371
.006789
.009070
.114
34
.016
.000201
.020
.000300
.008560
.011437
.091
35
.014
.000160
.018
.000243
.010795
.014422
.072
36
.013
.000127
.016
.000197
.013612
.018186
.057
37
.011
.000100
.014
.000160
.017165
.022932
.045
38
.010
.000080
.013
.000130
.021644
.028917
.036
39
.009
.000063
.012
.000106
.027293
.036464
.028
40
.008
.000050
.010
.000086
.034417
.045981
.023
41
.007
.000040
.009
.000070
.043399
.057982
.018
The larger temperature rise is due to the choice of the smaller core. If this is not accept-
able, choose a larger core or reduce the inductance requirements. 
The area product graph in Fig. 3.1.2 assumes a wire current density of 450 A/cm, 
which will give a temperature rise of 30°C for a core size with an AP of 1 cm4. To obtain 
the same temperature rise with larger cores, a smaller current density should be used. 
(The surface-area-to-volume ratio is not so good in larger cores.) However, the packing 
factor tends to be better in larger cores when copper strip or rectangular conductors are 
used. Hence, provided that the complete window is utilized, this results in a lower current 
density in the larger cores, compensating somewhat for the reduced surface area ratio. 
1.10.10 Step 10, Check Temperature Rise (Area Product Method) 
The “scrapless” E-core geometry allows the surface area of the wound core to be related 
to the area product. Further, the surface area defines the rate of heat loss and hence the 
temperature rise.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
cut pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete page on pdf reader; cut pages out of pdf online
3.24
PART 3
The nomogram in Fig. 3.1.7 shows the surface area as a function of area product (top 
and left scales), and the temperature rise as a function of dissipation, with surface area as a 
parameter (lower scale and diagonal lines). 
The thermal resistance values given in Fig. 3.1.2 are valid only for a temperature rise of 
30°C. Figure 3.16.11 shows that the thermal resistance is a function of the temperature dif-
ferential, and falls as the temperature differential increases. Hence, when the temperature 
rise of the wound core is other than 30°C, a more accurate figure will be obtained from 
Fig. 3.1.7. 
Example 
Predict the temperature rise of the EC41 core when the total wound component loss 
is 3.9 W.
The area product of the EC41 core is 1.46. 
Enter the nomogram in Fig. 3.1.7 at the top with an AP of 1.46. The intersect with the 
AP line (dashed line) gives the surface area on the left scale (40 cm2 in this example). 
Enter the nomogram with the total dissipation (lower scale), and the intersect with the 
surface area line (40 cm2) gives the temperature rise on the diagonal lines (70°C in this 
example). 
FIG. 3.1.7 Nomogram giving temperature rise as a function of area product and dissipation, with surface 
area as a parameter. 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
cut pages out of pdf; delete pdf pages reader
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete page on pdf document; delete pages from a pdf reader
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.25
1.11 FERRITE AND IRON POWDER ROD CHOKES 
For small low-inductance chokes, the use of straight open-ended ferrite or iron powder 
rods, bobbins, or spools or axial lead ferrite rods should be considered. In many cases, 
the ac current will be much smaller than the DC current (for example, in a second-stage 
LC output filter), and the high-frequency magnetic radiation from these open-ended rods, 
normally the most objectionable parameter, will be acceptably small. 
By careful attention to minimizing the interwinding capacitance—for example, using 
spaced windings and insulating the wire from the ferrite rod former—the self-resonant 
FIG. 3.1.8 Effective permeability M
e
of rod core chokes as a function of the initial material permeability, 
with the ratio of length to diameter as a parameter. (By W.J.Polydoroff)
3.26
PART 3
frequency of chokes wound on open-ended rods can be made very high. An example of a 
wound ferrite rod, a self-resonant choke filter, is given in Part 1, Sec. 20.5. These chokes, 
when used in output LC filters with low-ESR output capacitors, can be very effective in 
reducing high-frequency output noise. The intrinsically large air gap will prevent the 
saturation of high-permeability ferrite rods, even when the DC current is very large. The 
wire gauge should be chosen for acceptable dissipation and temperature rise. 
The lower-cost iron powder rods are also suitable for this application. The lower perme-
ability of these materials is not much of a disadvantage, as the large air gap swamps the 
initial permeability of the core material. The inductance is more dependent on the geometry 
of the winding than on the properties of the core.
The inductance of a “rod core” choke depends on the turns, core material permeability, 
and geometry. Figure 3.1.8 shows how the inductance of iron powder rod wound chokes 
is related to core permeability and winding geometry. It should be noted that for most 
practical applications, where the length-to-diameter ratio is of the order of 3:1 or less, 
the initial permeability of the core material μ
0
will not significantly affect the relative 
permeability μ
r
. Hence, the inductance is not very dependent on the core permeability. 
The information in Fig. 3.1.8 can also be applied to high-permeability ferrite rod chokes 
with little error. 
Figure 3.1.9 gives design information for single- and multiple-layer windings on rod-
type chokes. 
FIG. 3.1.9 Methods of winding rod core chokes, and inductance calculations. (Arnold Eng. Co.) 
1. INDUCTORS AND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.27
1.12 PROBLEMS
1. Explain the functional difference between inductors and chokes, as defined in this 
chapter. 
2. Why is the DC component of conducted current a problem in choke design? 
3. Give a method of reducing core permeability without necessarily changing the core 
material.
4. By what means is the problem of core saturation eliminated in dual-wound common-
mode input filter inductors? 
5. Explain the conditions that would control the selection of each of the following core 
materials for choke construction: (a) iron powder; (b) molybdenum Permalloy (MPP);
(c) gapped ferrite; (d) gapped laminated iron. 
This page intentionally left blank 
3.29
HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES 
USING IRON POWDER CORES 
2.1 INTRODUCTION 
Iron powder cores are constructed from finely divided ferromagnetic particles bonded 
together by a nonmagnetic material in such a way that small gaps are introduced in the 
magnetic path throughout the body of the core. These distributed gaps significantly lower 
the effective permeability and increase the energy storage capability of the core. A further 
advantage of the distributed gap is the reduction of the radiated magnetic field as a result 
of the elimination of the discontinuity associated with the discrete air gap, more common 
in the ferrite or silicon iron-cored chokes.
For filter applications, improved high-frequency performance is sometimes obtained 
from iron dust cores, because of their large high-frequency losses. The iron dust core tends 
to reduce radiation due to core loss, and the material can be manufactured to selectively 
absorb part of the high-frequency energy. These properties, together with the relatively 
low interwinding capacitance possible on a single-layer toroidal winding, results in good 
high-frequency rejection. However, considerable core losses and hence temperature rise 
may occur with this material at high frequency, when the flux density swing is large, and 
this must be considered in the choke design. An undoubted advantage of the iron dust core 
is its low cost. 
At high frequencies, better choke efficiency will be obtained with Molypermalloy 
(MPP) toroids, as these have much lower core losses at high frequencies and will give 
a lower temperature rise. These cores are available in a wide range of sizes, shapes, and 
permeabilities, typically ranging from 14 through 550. To their disadvantage, the cost 
of MPP cores is generally considerably greater than that of powdered iron. Hence, for 
medium-frequency switchmode output choke applications, iron powder cores offer a very 
cost-effective alternative to MPP, gapped ferrites, or laminated silicon iron. 
Unlike in the ferrite core, the power loss in the powdered iron cannot normally be 
neglected when establishing the total power loss and temperature rise. Using the manu-
facturer’s core data, operating frequency, core weight, and flux density excursion, the core 
losses can be established. These losses must be added to the copper losses to obtain the 
total dissipation. 
Although iron powder materials have relatively large core losses compared with fer-
rite and MPP materials, they have low losses compared with laminated iron. Further, the 
larger loss may not be a major problem, provided that the ac ripple current component is 
low (say, less than 10% of I
DC
). 
Hence, for many medium-frequency high-DC-current chokes, the core losses are not 
predominant, and the various Permalloy, iron powder, and gapped laminated cores can be 
CHAPTER 2 
3.29
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested