c# pdf reader table : Delete pdf pages acrobat SDK Library service wpf asp.net winforms dnn Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi49-part518

3.30
PART 3
extremely size- and cost-effective. The saturating flux level is much higher than it is for 
ferrite materials, giving more energy storage and reduced size. 
Although at higher frequencies, gapped ferrites in the form of E, I, or pot cores are more 
often used, considerable magnetic radiation can occur where outer limbs are gapped. Also, 
the bobbin windings used with these cores will usually have relatively large interwinding 
capacitance, and the self-resonant frequency will be low. Consequently, E-core chokes will 
not give very efficient high-frequency noise rejection when used on their own. 
If a two-stage LC output filter is used, good high-frequency rejection in the first stage is 
not essential, and a simple, low-cost ferrite rod choke in the second stage is very effective in 
dealing with the higher-frequency components. In such applications, the multilayer wound 
E core can be very effective. 
As with the gapped ferrite core previously considered, the design exercise with pow-
dered iron tends to be an iterative process. AC and DC flux density levels are calculated to 
ensure good design margins, and the wire gauge is selected for minimum loss. For the best 
high-frequency rejection (low interwinding capacitance), single-layer windings should be 
used on toroidal cores. 
2.2 ENERGY STORAGE CHOKES 
The energy stored in the choke core is proportional to the square of the flux density 
and inversely proportional to the effective permeability of the material. Hence, from 
Eq. 3.A.15, 
Energy
eff
s
B
2
M
The high saturation flux density of powdered iron cores (greater than 1T), together with 
their low permeability (35 to 75), makes them very suitable for energy storage chokes. 
2.3 CORE PERMEABILITY 
The materials considered in this section are the Micrometals Mix #8 through Mix #40.*
These have permeabilities in the range 35 to 75. Table 3.2.1 shows the basic properties of 
these materials. (Other manufacturers produce similar materials.) 
Iron powder materials have a “soft” saturation characteristic. This has two advantages 
for choke applications. First, good overload characteristics are provided, preventing a 
*
A trade name of Micrometals Inc.
TABLE 3.2.1 General Material Properties 
Mix #
Permeability, M
0
Temperature 
stability ( )
Inductance
tolerance, %
Relative cost
Core color code
8
35
225 ppm/°C
 10/ 5
4.0
Yellow/Red
26
75
822
 15/ 7½
1.2
Yellow/White
28
22
415
 10/  5
1.7
Gray/Green
33
33
635
 10/  5
1.6
Gray/Yellow
40
60
950
15/ 7½
1.0
Green/Yellow
Delete pdf pages acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages pdf preview
Delete pdf pages acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages from pdf online
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.31
sudden loss of inductance if the current is above the normal maximum value. Second, 
the chokes can be designed to “swing,” that is, to provide a larger inductance at low DC 
currents. The swinging choke maintains continuous current conduction to a lower load 
current. This is often an advantage in buck regulator applications. Figure 3.2.1 shows 
how the initial permeability of the iron powder material falls as the DC magnetizing force 
increases.
2.4 GAPPING IRON POWDER E CORES 
Iron powder E cores may be gapped to increase their energy storage capability, prevent 
DC saturation, or obtain permeability values between the discrete values provided by the 
material mix. Because of the rapid fall in effective permeability at high values of DC mag-
netizing force, a small air gap can result in an increase in effective permeability under some 
high-current conditions. This is particularly true with the #26 and #40 mix materials. 
2.5 METHODS USED TO DESIGN IRON POWDER 
E-CORE CHOKES (GRAPHICAL AREA PRODUCT 
METHOD) 
General Conditions 
In this example, in the interest of minimum cost, it has been assumed that the smallest 
E core consistent with a maximum temperature rise of 40°C is to be used. The required 
inductance and maximum DC load current are known. 
FIG. 3.2.1 Magnetization parameters of iron powder cores. (Micrometals Inc.) 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf reader
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages in pdf online; delete page from pdf file
3.32
PART 3
With the above parameters defined, the smallest core size may be obtained using the 
area product nomogram in Fig. 3.2.2. [This nomogram is developed from Eq. 3.A.13 and 
covers the current range from 1 to 100 A, and inductances from 250 nH to 32 mH.] 
Design Steps 
In the area product graphical design approach, the following design steps should be fol-
lowed: 
1. To establish the core size, obtain the required area product as follows: Enter the bot-
tom of the graph with the required DC current, project up to the required inductance, 
then project horizontally left, to the vertical scale, which then indicates the required 
area product. 
FIG. 3.2.2 Nomogram for iron powder cores, giving area product (and hence core size) as a func-
tion of DC load current and required inductance, with thermal resistance as a parameter.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete page in pdf reader; delete page from pdf preview
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page pdf; delete page from pdf file online
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.33
The area product translates to core size (see Table 3.2.2). Interpolate between the 
lines for other inductances, choose the next larger core size, or reduce the required 
inductance if the area product is between core sizes. 
2. Calculate the number of turns needed to give the required inductance, using Eq. 3.A.9: 
N
LI
B A
e

ʉ
10
4
TABLE 3.2.2 Iron Powder E Core and Bobbin Parameters
Core
type
No.
Core parameters
Bobbin parameters
l, cm
A
e, 
cm2
V, 
cm3
W, 
cm2
AP,
cm4
A
wb,
cm2
A
pb, 
cm4
m
lt
,
cm
S
a
,
cm2
E75
4.13
0.226
0.929
0.530
0.12
0.4
0.09
3.8
10.3
E100
5.08
0.403
2.05
0.810
0.32
0.62
0.25
5.1
16.5
E125
7.34
0.907
6.83
1.37
1.21
0.97
0.9
6.4
34.3
E137
7.30
0.907
6.63
1.51
1.37
1.22
1.1
7.0
36.1
E162
8.25
1.61
13.3
1.70
2.74
1.32
2.13
8.3
49.9
E168
10.3
1.84
19.0
2.87
5.28
2.32
4.3
9.2
67
E168A
10.3
2.45
25.3
2.87
7.03
2.17
5.3
10.2
73
E178
8.63
2.48
23.3
1.94
4.81
1.61
4.0
9.5
67
E220
13.1
3.46
42.3
4.07
14.08
3.33
11.5
11.9
114
E225
10.4
3.58
40.5
2.78
9.95
2.05
7.3
11.4
90
E450
20.9
12.2
279
12.7
154
10.5
128
22.8
354
where l  magnetic path length, cm
A
e
 effective core area, cm2
V  volume of core, cm3
W  window area of core, cm2
AP  area product of core, cm4
A
wb
 window area of bobbin, cm2
A
pb
 area prodict of bobbin, cm4
m
lt
 mean length of turn, cm
S
a
 surface area of wound core, cm2
3. Calculate the initial permeability required from the core material, using Eq. 3.A.17. 
M
M
r
e
e
l L
N A

10
1
0
2
4. Select the nearest core material that meets or exceeds the permeability requirements 
from Table 3.2.1. 
5. Calculate the DC magnetizing force HDC and check the percentage initial permeability 
from Fig. 3.2.2. 
H
NI
l
e

0.4 P
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages pdf files; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
3.34
PART 3
6. Calculate the permeability of the selected core at the working magnetizing force H, and 
establish whether an air gap is required. (A gap is required if the permeability is too 
large or the core is saturating.) 
7. If an air gap is required, first establish the effective length of the air gap built into the 
core material at the existing permeability. (This is the air gap that would exist if the 
distributed gap were all collected in one place.) Assume that the core material itself 
has zero reluctance. This calculation is quite simple; for example, if the existing per-
meability is 50, then the core length is 50 times longer than it would have been if it 
had been all air. This means that the effective air gap is only 
1
50
/
of the actual length of 
the core. 
Also calculate the required effective gap at the required (lower) permeability; for 
example, if a permeability of 40 is required, then the gap would be 
1
40
/
of the core length. 
The difference between these two effective gaps is the length of the real air gap that must 
be added to obtain the required permeability. Hence 
l
l
l
g
e
x
e
r

M
M
8. Calculate wire size and winding resistance. 
9. Calculate the copper loss and check the predicted temperature rise of the finished choke 
from the thermal resistance shown in Fig. 3.2.2. If the ripple current exceeds 10% or the 
operating frequency is above 40 kHz, check the core loss and adjust the temperature rise 
prediction if necessary.
The following example demonstrates the use of the above procedure.
2.6 EXAMPLE OF IRON POWDER E-CORE 
CHOKE DESIGN (USING THE GRAPHICAL AREA 
PRODUCT METHOD) 
In  this example, a  25-kHz continuous-mode  buck regulator choke with the following 
parameters is to be designed on an iron powder E core: 
Inductance  1 mH
Mean DC current  6 A
Maximum temperature rise  50°C
Maximum ripple current  10% I DC
2.6.1 Step 1, Establish Core Size 
Obtain the area product from Fig. 3.2.2.
In this example, entering the graph with 6 A and projecting up to the 1-mH line gives 
an area product of 4.4.
From Table 3.2.2, the E168 core with an AP of 5.28 (4.3 with bobbin) meets this 
requirement. 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pages of pdf reader; add and delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete pages in pdf reader; delete page from pdf acrobat
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.35
2.6.2 Step 2, Calculate Turns
N
LI
BA
e

10
4
where N  total turns
L inductance, mH
I maximum DC current, A
B maximum flux density, mT
A
e
 effective core area, cm2
Note:To limit core loss, the graph in Fig. 3.2.2 was developed using a peak flux density of 
350 mT. This value is used to calculate the turns. 
From Table 3.2.2, the E168 core constants are 
Area of center pole A
e
 1.84 cm 
Length of magnetic path l
e
 10.3 cm
Hence
N
r r
r

1 6 10
350 1 84
93
4
.
turns
2.6.3 Step 3, Calculate Required Initial Core Relative Permeability μ
r
M
M
r
e
e
lL
N A

10
1
2
0
where M
0
 4P r 10–7
l
e
 effective magnetic path length, cm
L  inductance, mH
N  turns
A
e
 area of core, cm2
Hence
M
P
r

r r
r
r
r

10 3 1 10
4
93
184
51
1
7
2
.
.
10
At a required permeability of 51, only the 40 and 26 core materials can be considered, as 
the rest have permeabilities that are already too low. 
2.6.4 Step 4, Calculate the DC Magnetizing Force H
DC
Note: The magnetizing force is required so that the percentage initial permeability can be 
obtained.
H
NI
l
e
DC
Oe

0.4 P
3.36
PART 3
where H
DC
 DC magnetizing force Oe
N  turns (93)
I  DC current (6 A)
l
e
 magnetic path length (10.3 cm)
Hence
H
DC
93 6
Oe

r
r

04
10 3
68
.
.
P
2.6.5 Step 5, Establish Effective Working Permeability and Select Core 
Material 
From Fig. 3.2.1, at H  68 Oe the percentage initial permeability is only 41% of M-75 for 
the #26 mix material or 44% of M-60 for the #40 mix material, giving 
  M
r(eff)
 30.75 for the #26 material
or
M
r(eff )
 26.4 for the #40 material
Hence, at H  68, the effective permeability of the nongapped cores in any of the materials 
is lower than the required value of 51, because the core material is approaching saturation. 
However, if the higher-permeability material is chosen, it is possible to delay the onset of 
saturation by introducing an air gap. (Although the gap will reduce the permeability at 
low values of magnetizing force, it will increase it at high values by reducing the onset of 
saturation.) Hence in this example an air gap is indicated. 
To obtain the highest possible permeability at full-load current, the higher-permeability 
(M-75) #26 mix material is selected, and it is gapped to give a permeability of 51 at low 
currents.
2.6.6 Step 6, Establish Air Gap Size 
The effective length of the core air gap intrinsic to the E168 M75 core (that is, the effective 
length of the internal distributed gap) is l
e
/M
r
(103/75 mm  1.37 mm, this example). If 
the effective permeability M
r(eff)
is to be 51, then the effective air gap must be increased to 
103/51 2.02 mm. The difference is 0.65 mm (26 mil), and this is the required total air gap 
(in practice 13 mil in each leg). Hence
l
l
l
g
e
x
e
r

M
M
mm
where l
e
 effective length of magnetic path (of core), mm
l
g
 length of air gap, mm
M
r
 relative permeability (before gap is introduced)
M
x
 required permeability (after gap us introduced)
In this example, 
l
g


103
51
103
75
0. 65mm
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.37
Some adjustment of the air gap may be required to obtain the optimum inductance. Check 
core saturation (Part 2, Sec. 2.4.11): 
B
N I
p
DC
o
DC

M
A
10
3
2.6.7 Step 7, Establish Optimum Wire Size 
For minimum copper loss the winding should fill the available bobbin window area with 
some allowance for insulation. 
From Appendix 3.B, the packing factor K
u
for round wire with heavy-grade insulation 
is 0.64. 
The E168 core and bobbin have been selected. From Table 3.2.2, the window area of 
the bobbin A
wb
is 2.32 cm, and 93 turns are required (from step 2). Hence the area of the 
wire A
x
is 
A
A K
N
x
wb
u


r

232 0 64
93
0016
.
.
.
cm
2
From Table 3.1.1, a #16 AWG wire is selected.
2.6.8 Step 8, Calculate Copper Loss 
The total length of wire l on the fully wound bobbin can be calculated from the number of 
turns N and mean turn length l
m
.
From Table 3.2.2, the mean turn length l
m
for the E168 bobbin is 9.2 cm.
Hence
l Nl
m

cm
Therefore, in this example, l  93 r 9.2  856 cm.
The resistance per centimeter of #16 AWG copper wire RT
cm
at 70°C (50°C rise above 
ambient) is 0.00015 7 /cm (Fig. 3.4.11). Hence the total resistance of the winding R
wT
is 
R
wT
 l RT
cm
 856 r 0.00015  0.1287
The power P dissipated in the winding as a result of the DC current flow is 
P I2R  62r 0.128  4.6 W
2.6.9 Step 9, Calculate Temperature Rise
From Fig. 3.2.2, the thermal resistance (R
o
w-a) of the E168 wound assembly at a tempera-
ture rise above ambient of 50°C is given by the intersection of the horizontal E168 line with 
the diagonal 50°C line as 9.1°C/W (top scale). Hence the temperature rise of the wound 
core $T
a
resulting from copper loss only would be approximately 
$T
a
(R
0
w-a) P  9.1 r 4.6  41.8°C
3.38
PART 3
Core Loss (Iron Powder Cores). The above example neglects the core loss and is valid so 
long as this loss is negligible. However, at ripple currents of more than 10% and/ or frequen-
cies higher than 40 kHz, the core loss can become significant and must be considered. 
In this example, calculate the core loss for the above choke at 10% ripple current and 
40-kHz operation. From Eq. 3.A.9 the flux density swing can be determined: 
$ 
$
B
L I
AN
e
10
4
where $B  flux density swing, mT
L  inductance, mH
I  Ripple current, A p-p
A
e
 effective core area, cm2
N  turns
Therefore
$ 
r
r
r

B
1 0 6 10
184 93
35
4
.
.
mT
From Fig. 3.2.3, the core loss at 35 mT and 40 kHz is 50 mW/cm3, and with a core volume 
of 19 cm3, the total core loss is 950 mW. Hence, in this example, the core loss would give a 
20% increase in the total loss, and the temperature rise will now be 50.3°C. Therefore some 
allowance must be made for core loss. 
At high frequency and high ripple currents, the core loss quickly predominates and may 
even prevent the use of iron powder cores, as the following example shows. 
Example 
Consider the loss in the above choke example (1 mH at 6 A) if the choke were operated at 
100 kHz and 20% ripple current (20% r 6 A  1.2 A p–p ripple current).
Hence
$ 
r
r
r

B
1 1 2 10
184 93
70
4
.
.
mT
From Fig. 3.2.3, the core loss of #26 mix at 70 mT and 100 kHz is 800 mW/cm3. The 
core volume (Table 3.2.2) is 19 cm3, and the total core loss is (0.8 r 19)  15.2 W. 
Clearly the #26 iron powder material would not be suitable for this application. 
The corresponding loss using M-60 Molypermalloy (MPP) material would be 1.5 W, 
and with gapped ferrite, only 0.5 W. Hence, these materials would be more suitable and 
would be considered for this type of high-frequency, high-ripplecurrent application.
In the final application, the temperature rise depends on the complex  thermal 
interaction of the complete thermal system in the finished product. A final tempera-
ture measurement of the choke under working conditions is essential to complete the 
design process.
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.39
FIG. 3.2.3 Core loss as a function of ac flux density swing for iron powder #26 mix, with frequency as a 
parameter. (Micrometals Inc.) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested