c# pdf reader table : Cut pages out of pdf application software cloud windows html web page class Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi50-part520

This page intentionally left blank 
Cut pages out of pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in reader; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Cut pages out of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pages pdf
3.41
CHOKE DESIGN 
USING IRON POWDER 
TOROIDAL CORES
3.1 INTRODUCTION
Iron powder toroids can be very suitable for chokes in output filters of power converters, 
provided that the DC current component is large compared with the ripple current. With 
iron powder, the core loss will be relatively low in the mid-frequency range, and although 
it will be somewhat higher than with MPP (molybdenum Permalloy) cores, there is a 
significantly lower cost.
In applications in which high-frequency noise rejection is important, toroidal chokes 
with a single-layer winding give minimum interwinding capacitance and good noise 
rejection. When maximum inductance is required, a “full” multilayer winding will be 
used. 
For the purpose of this discussion, the term “choke” will be used to describe an induc-
tor that carries a large DC bias current and small ac ripple currents of less than 20%. 
Since toroidal cores are generally supplied uncut, it is not possible to introduce an air 
gap into the magnetic path so as to change the permeability; hence, the design procedure 
must ensure that the core will not saturate under maximum current conditions, without 
requiring an air gap. 
The area product of a toroid is often much larger than that of an E core of equivalent 
core area, as the window (center hole area) is relatively large. The main reason for a large 
window is to provide space for the winding shuttle when a winding machine is used. 
Unlike the bobbin-wound E core, the window space of a toroid cannot be fully utilized 
when machine winding is used. 
It is common practice to wind a single layer on toroids, both for ease of winding and to 
get lower interwinding capacitance for improved high-frequency noise rejection. This can 
give a very poor copper packing factor with relatively large copper loss. 
A further complication unique to the toroid is the variation in the wire packing factor 
between the inner and outer surfaces. Because of this, small cores tend to have very poor 
packing factors when large-gauge wires are used. 
The strict consistency of geometric ratios brought about by the “scrapless” approach 
to the E-core topology is not relevant to toroids; hence, there is a much greater variation 
in core geometry with toroidal cores. As a result of the above limitations, together with 
the geometric inconsistency of the toroids, the area product design approach used for 
transformers and E-core chokes tends to be less generally applicable; it will not be used 
in the following example. 
CHAPTER 3 
3.41
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image Cropper Control SDK to Cut Out Part of Image. Do you need to cut out certain unwanted part from one image file by VB.NET code?
delete pages pdf online; delete pdf page acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pdf pages; delete a page from a pdf
3.42
PART 3
3.2 PREFERRED DESIGN APPROACH (TOROIDS) 
Because the toroid window area tends to be rather large relative to the core cross-sectional 
area, it has been found better to allow the magnetic requirements to define the minimum 
core size, rather than the temperature rise requirements that were used for the E-core 
design approach. 
In the following example, the need to provide a defined inductance, while preventing 
core saturation under maximum current conditions, will be used to define the minimum 
core size. 
Further, it will be shown that this design approach yields a suitable core size and 
required number of turns directly from a single nomogram, when only the required mean 
current and inductance are known. The maximum temperature rise is then controlled by 
selecting a suitable wire gauge. 
Although the nomograms used  in this section were developed specifically for the 
Micrometals® powder cores, they may be used for any powder cores of similar geometry 
and permeability. 
3.3 SWINGING CHOKES 
Chokes wound on real ferromagnetic materials will display some nonlinearity as a result 
of the nonlinear magnetization characteristic. The general effect is to reduce the effective 
small-signal dynamic inductance as the DC polarizing current increases. Where this effect 
is undesirable, air gaps will often be introduced to linearize the characteristic. 
In some applications, a nonlinear choke characteristic (swinging choke) can be useful. 
For example, in buck regulators, if the inductance of the choke can be made to increase 
at light loads, continuous-mode converter operation can be extended to smaller minimum 
load currents. Conversely, at larger load currents, the inductance will be lower, giving 
better transient response. Chokes that display this change in effective inductance with 
DC bias current are known as “swinging chokes.” The nonlinear B/H characteristic of 
nongapped iron powder toroids can be used to provide an inductance “swing” ratio of 
up to 2:1.
3.3.1 Types of Core Material Most Suitable for Swinging Choke Applications 
For good swinging choke performance, the B/H loop of the core material should be very 
nonlinear. As the magnetizing force H increases (DC load current increases), the core mate-
rial is taken toward saturation, and the permeability should become progressively lower. 
Some iron powder materials are particularly suitable for this application, as they display a 
rapid change in permeability. 
Figure 3.2.1 shows how the permeability of the various iron powder materials falls as 
the DC magnetizing force H increases. The #26 and #40 materials display a rapid fall in 
permeability as H increases and are more suitable for swinging choke applications. 
If these materials are operated at a maximum full-load magnetizing force H of 50, the 
permeability will be only half of the initial value, and the incremental full load induc-
tance will be only half of the initial (low-current) value. This change in permeability 
gives an inductance swing of 2:1, a useful range. Further, the core is not easily saturated 
at higher values of H, and the current overload safety margin is good. (A current over-
load of 100% will only reduce the inductance by a further 20%, and the core will not be 
saturated.) This provides a safe overload current margin for most applications. Further, it 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
delete pdf pages online; cut pages from pdf preview
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.43
will be shown that choosing the magnetization H for a value of 50 gives a suitable core 
size, resulting in a working temperature rise not exceeding 40°C. 
3.3.2 Design Example (Swinging Chokes) 
The following design example is for a swinging choke with a 2:1 inductance swing 
ratio, wound on a toroidal powder core. A graphical design method based on the nomo-
gram shown in Fig. 3.3.1 will be used. (The derivation of this nomogram is given in 
Appendix 3.C.)
FIG. 3.3.1 Nomogram for iron powder toroidal cores, giving turns as a function of choke current, with 
required inductance and core size as parameters. 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Please have a quick test by using the following C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page in pdf document
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from pdf in reader
3.44
PART 3
Although Fig. 3.3.1 has been based on the #26 mix material, it can be used for all the 
iron powder materials by applying the inductance adjustment factors shown in the dia-
gram. When this design approach is used with the low-permeability #28 and #8 materials, 
the major difference is that the inductance swing will be much smaller.
3.3.3 Choke Specification 
Assume a requirement for a continuous-mode, 5-V, 10-A, 100-kHz buck regulator swing-
ing choke. The peak-to-peak ripple current is to be 20% of the rated current at the maxi-
mum duty ratio of 48%. The inductance swing is to be 2:1, so as to give continuous 
choke conduction down to a minimum load of 0.5 A. To satisfy this requirement, the 
ripple current must not exceed 10% of rated output current at minimum load. Hence at 
a 0.5-A load the inductance must be double that at full load, and the choke specification 
will be as follows: 
V
out
 5 V 
I
mean
 10 A 
I
L(p–p)
 2 A (at full load) 
f  100 kHz 
t
p
 10 μs 
t
off
 5.2 μs 
I
L(p-p)
 1 A (at minimum load, 0.5 A)
3.3.4 Step 1, Calculate the Inductance Required at Full load 
In the buck regulator (Fig. 2.20.1a), during the “off” or flywheel period, the voltage e across 
the choke L is constant at V
out
plus a diode drop; hence
e
L
di
dt

where |e|  the magnitude of the voltage across the choke during the “off” period
di/dt the rate of change of current during the “off” period
and L may be calculated as follows.
In this example,
eV

out
V
07 5 7
.
.
and
di
dt
I
t
L


)
.
p p
off
A/
2
52
M
Hence
L
r
r

57 5 2 10
2
14 8
6
.
.
. MH
3.3.5 Step 2, Obtain Core Size and Turns from Nomogram (Fig. 3.3.1) 
Enter the nomogram at the bottom scale with the required maximum load current of 10 A. 
Project upward to the required inductance (14.8 μH in this example). Use the 15-μH full-load 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages on pdf
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for your C# project.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; add or remove pages from pdf
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.45
inductance intersect (heavy line marked 15 μH). The nearest (lower) solid diagonal gives 
the required core size (T90 in this case). 
The horizontal left projection from  the core and inductance intersect indicates  the 
required turns (21 in this example). Thus a T90 core wound with 21 turns will be used. 
3.4 WINDING OPTIONS 
Once the required turns have been determined (as shown above), there are three options 
normally considered for toroidal choke winding depending on the required performance. 
3.4.1 Option A, Minimum Loss Winding (Full winding) 
In this design option, the main aim is to minimize the power loss (mainly copper loss). 
Hence the maximum wire gauge that will just fill the available window space (normally 
limited to 55% of the total window area) is selected. In this case the bobbin will occupy 
some window space, so only 45% will remain for the winding.
This “full winding” will give the lowest copper loss, but it is more difficult and 
expensive to manufacture. Further, because of larger interlayer winding capacitance, the 
high-frequency noise rejection is not as good as that of a single-layer winding. 
3.4.2 Option B, Single-Layer Winding 
In this option, a wire gauge is selected that will just give the required number of turns in a 
single layer (with a space between start and finish of at least one turn). This option gives 
easy, low-cost windings with a low distributed capacitance and good high-frequency noise 
rejection. However, it has the disadvantage of poor utility of the available winding space, 
with higher copper loss and the largest temperature rise. 
3.4.3 Option C, Winding for a Specified Temperature Rise 
This option is a compromise approach in which the wire gauge is selected to give a speci-
fied temperature rise that is between the minimum value provided by option A and the 
maximum loss condition of the single-layer option B. 
3.5 DESIGN EXAMPLE (OPTION A) 
Once the inductance, turns, and core size have been selected using Fig. 3.3.1, as described 
in Sec. 3.4, the maximum wire size that will just fill 45% of the selected core window area 
is required. 
3.5.1 Selecting Wire Size 
Figure 3.3.2 is a nomogram showing the gauge of wire and number of turns that will just 
give a full winding on the selected core. 
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages
delete a page in a pdf file; delete blank page from pdf
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pages from pdf
3.46
PART 3
FIG. 3.3.2 Nomogram for iron powder toroids, giving wire size as a function of turns, with core size and 
single- or multiple-layer windings as parameters. 
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.47
Enter the graph from the left with the required number of turns. The intersection of 
the number of turns with the solid diagonal “core line” for the selected core indicates the 
required wire gauge on the lower scale. 
Note: The dashed lines in Fig. 3.3.2 indicate the gauge of wire to be used if a single-layer 
winding is to be maintained. 
It should be noted that at wire gauges above #18 AWG, the option for multiple wires 
of 18 AWG (for ease of winding) is provided. Other wire sizes may also be used, so long 
as the copper cross-sectional area is maintained. 
When the solid line is followed above the slope discontinuity on Fig. 3.3.2, the winding 
reverts from a single-layer to a multiple-layer winding. 
Example 
Using the information for the 10-A 15-μH example in Sec. 3.3.5, 21 turns on a T90 core 
are required. Entering Fig. 3.3.2 with 21 turns, the intersect with the T90 core solid line 
indicates a wire gauge of #13 AWG, or three wires of #18 AWG, for a full winding. (The 
intersect is above the slope discontinuity; hence the winding will be multiple-layer.) 
3.5.2 Temperature Rise, Full Winding 
Figure 3.3.3 indicates the temperature rise (above ambient free air temperature) to be 
expected from a full winding on the stated core sizes (or for cores of similar surface area 
with the same copper loss). 
Enter the graph at the left with the required ampere-turns. The intersect with the core 
size indicates the temperature rise on the lower scale. 
Example 
Using the information from the previous example, 10 A and 21 turns gives 210 ampere-
turns, on the T90 core. 
Entering Fig. 3.3.3 at the left, with 210 ampere-turns, the intersect with the T90 core 
indicates a temperature rise of approximately 15°C (on the lower scale). 
This temperature rise is a free air prediction considering copper loss and core area; it 
neglects core losses, which should be small. However, the temperature needs to be checked 
in the finished application, since core losses, together with the thermal contribution from 
nearby hot components, can make a considerable difference in the final temperature. 
3.6 DESIGN EXAMPLE (OPTION B) 
Single-layer windings have the advantage of  being simple to manufacture  and having 
low interwinding capacitance, giving good high-frequency rejection. The disadvantage is 
smaller wire sizes and higher copper loss, giving a higher temperature rise. 
3.6.1 Selecting Wire Size 
Using the same example as for the full winding, a choke of 15 μH at 10 A on a T90 core 
will require 21 turns.
3.48
PART 3
Entering Fig. 3.3.2 with 21 turns and using the dashed T90 core line this time (for a 
single-layer winding) yields a smaller gauge of #15 AWG (or two wires of #18 AWG). 
3.6.2 Temperature Rise 
To obtain the temperature rise for a single-layer winding, enter Fig. 3.3.4 with the load 
current. The intersect with the selected wire gauge indicates the temperature rise on the 
lower scale. 
FIG. 3.3.3 Nomogram for iron powder toroids, giving temperature rise as a function of choke 
DC ampere-turns, with core size for single-layer windings as a parameter.
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.49
In this example, 10 A and #15 AWG yields a predicted temperature rise of 22°C (47% 
higher than the full winding example). 
3.7 DESIGN EXAMPLE (OPTION C) 
This option is more difficult to design, since it requires a more iterative process. Using the 
preceding approaches, the temperature will be between 15 and 22°C, depending on the 
wire gauge. For temperature outside this range (for the same current and inductance), the 
same design process as in the above examples may be used, with larger or smaller cores 
selected to give smaller or larger temperature rises. Several iterations may be required to get 
acceptable results. Alternatively, the process may be reversed by starting with the required 
temperature rise, using Fig. 3.3.4 for single-layer windings or Fig. 3.3.3 for full windings. 
Note: Changing the number of turns from that indicated in Fig. 3.3.1 will change the 
inductance and “swing” ratio. (The swing ratio is given by the percentage permeability 
graph, Fig. 3.2.1.) 
FIG. 3.3.4 Nomogram for iron powder toroids using single-layer windings, giving temperature rise as 
a function of DC load current, with wire size as a parameter.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested