c# pdf reader table : Delete page on pdf reader software Library dll winforms .net web page web forms Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi51-part521

3.50
PART 3
3.8 CORE LOSS 
In all the above examples, the core loss has been neglected; hence the temperature rise 
prediction is valid only when the core loss is in fact negligible. At high frequency and high 
ripple currents, the core loss may be significant and should be considered. 
For the previous example, the flux density swing at full load can be determined from 
Eq. 3.A.9 as follows: 
$B
LI
AN
e
ac
10
4
where $B  flux density swing, T
L  inductance, H
I
L(p–p)
 ripple current, A p–p
A
e
 core area, cm2
N  turns
In the above example,
L  15 μH
I
L(p–p)
 2 A
A
e
 0.422 cm2
N  21
$ 
r
r r
r

B
15 10
2 10
0422 21
33 8
6
4
.
. mT
From Fig. 3.2.3 (p. 3.39), at a frequency of 100 kHz and a flux density swing of 33.8 mT, 
the core loss is 140 mW/cm3. The core volume is 2.68 cm3, giving a total loss of 375 mW. 
Although small, this compares with the copper loss and should be considered when calcu-
lating the temperature rise. At lower frequencies the core loss can be neglected.
3.9 TOTAL DISSIPATION AND TEMPERATURE RISE 
When the core loss is large and cannot be neglected, the temperature rise can be obtained 
from Fig. 3.3.5, using the total dissipation figure.
Add the copper and core losses to obtain the total dissipation. Enter the nomogram 
(Fig. 3.3.5) with the total dissipation on the lower scale. The intersect with the surface area 
(left) or core size (right) gives the predicted temperature rise on the diagonal lines.
3.9.1 Calculate Winding Resistance 
Using the example for option A, the full winding (Sec. 3.5), calculate the copper resistance 
from the wire gauge, number of turns, and total winding length. For the full winding the 
following parameters were obtained: 
Turns N  21
Wire gauge  3 wires of #18 AWG
M
lt
 3 cm
RT 
cm
(resistance of #18 AWG)  0.00024 7/cm at 50°C (p. 3.23)
Load current  10 A
Delete page on pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in preview; best pdf editor delete pages
Delete page on pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf; delete pages pdf document
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.51
The total copper resistance of each wire is given by 
R
NM RT
lt
total
cm

Hence, with three wires in parallel,
R
total

r r

21 3 0 00024
3
0005
.
.
7
Copperdissipation
W

I R
2
0.5
Add the core loss Sec. 3.8 (375 mW).
Total dissipation  0.5 + 0.375  0.875 W
From Fig. 3.3.5, the temperature rise for the T90 wound core at full load, including the core 
loss, will be approximately 22°C.
3.10 LINEAR (TOROIDAL) CHOKE DESIGN 
Although the design approach detailed in Secs. Secs. 3.2 through 3.7 specifically applies 
to “swinging chokes,” it can also be used for linear choke design. Linear chokes require the 
core permeability to remain constant throughout the current range so that the inductance 
FIG. 3.3.5 Nomogram for toroidal cores, giving temperature rise as a function of total dissipation and 
core surface area, with the surface area of typical cores as a parameter.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages of pdf; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
pdf delete page; copy pages from pdf to word
3.52
PART 3
will remain constant. It is not possible to completely eliminate the inductance swing, as 
all materials display some curvature in the B/H characteristic. However, the #28 and #8 
materials, when operated at a magnetizing force of 50 Oe, will have a maximum swing of 
less than 10%, as shown in Fig. 3.2.1.
Hence, for linear choke design, choose #8 or #28 material and adjust the inductance 
shown in Fig. 3.3.1 by the correction factor shown for the selected material. Otherwise 
proceed as for “swinging choke” design.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete blank pages in pdf online; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page in pdf preview
3.53
DERIVATION OF AREA 
PRODUCT EQUATIONS
for Energy Storage Chokes
The area product (AP) is the product of the core winding window area and the center 
pole cross-sectional area. As such, the dimensions are in cm4. This factor can be used by 
core manufacturers and designers to indicate the power-handling ability of transformer and 
choke cores.1,2
Chokes (inductors that carry a large DC current component) wound on ferrite cores will 
have relatively large air gaps to prevent saturation of the core. As a result, the majority of 
the reluctance and stored energy will be concentrated in the air gap, not in the core. On 
this basis the following approximations can be used in the derivation of equations relating 
the area product (AP) to the inductance and current ratings of chokes wound on gapped 
ferrite cores:
1. The reluctance of the core may be considered negligible compared with the air gap; 
hence all the energy will be assumed to be concentrated in the air gap.
2. With a large air gap, the permeability μr is nearly constant, provided that saturation is 
avoided; hence the B/H characteristic is assumed to be linear.
3. A uniform distribution of flux density in the air gap is assumed.
4. A uniform distribution of field intensity H in the air gap is assumed.
3.A.1. BASIC MAGNETIC EQUATIONS SI UNITS
1. In accordance with Faraday’s law of induction, the emf induced in a winding is
e N
d
dt
LdI
dt


&
(3.A.1)
Also,
& A B
g
Hence
e N A
dB
dt
g

APPENDIX 3.A
3.53
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete pages pdf file
3.54
PART 3
For this example (assuming that the gap is concentrated in a single place), A
g
A
p
, where 
A
p
is the area of the core pole. (Fringe effects are neglected.)
2. Ampere’s law of electromotive force (as applied to the field in the air gap) is
mmf 


¯
Hdl
H
NI
g
l
g
(3.A.2)
3. The magnetic field relationship is
B
H
r
M M
0
But μ
r
 1 (in the air gap). Hence
H
B

M
0
(3.A.3)
From Eq. (3.A.1),
e L
di
dt

Hence
edt Ldi

Multiplying both sides by I and integrating,
J
eIdt
LIdi


¯
¯
(3.A.4)
Hence
4.
J
LI

1
2
2
From Eq. (3.A.2),
5.
I
Hl
N
g

(3.A.5)
Multiplying Eq. (3.A.5) by Eq. (3.A.1),
EI N A
dB
dt
H
l
N
g
g

Hence
EIdt A l H dB
g g

C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected annotations. guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer &
delete pdf pages android; delete pages from a pdf online
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
add and delete pages in pdf; delete page on pdf
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.55
Integrating both sides,
6.
EIdt J A l HdB
g g
¯
¯
 
(3.A.6)
From Eq. (3.A.3),
H
B

M
0
Substituting for H in Eq. (3.A.6), with μ
0
constant,
J A l
BdB
Al
BdB
g g
g g


¯
¯
M
M
0
0
Hence
J
Al B
Al
B
B
g g
g g

ʉ

2
0
0
2
1
2
M
M
( )
( )
But from Eq. (3.A.3),
B
H
M
0

Hence
7.
J
BH A l
g g

1
2
J
(3.A.7)
Equating Eqs. (3.A.4) and (3.A.7),
8.
1
2
1
2
2
LI
BH A l
g g

(3.A.8)
Hence the circuit energy equals the magnetic energy stored in the gap.
From Eq. (3.A.2),
NI Hl
g

Substitute in Eq. (3.A.8):
1
2
1
2
2
LI
BA NI
g

Simplify:
LI BA N
g

3.56
PART 3
Hence
9.
N
LI
BA
g

(3.A.9)
where I  peak current.
Now consider the winding: The ampere-turns is the current density in the wire I
a
multi-
plied by the usable window area A
w
modified by the packing factor K
u
.
NI
I A K
a w
u
rms

where I
rms
 rms (heating) current.
Hence
10.
N
AI K
I
w a
u

rms
(3.A.10)
Equating N in Eqs. (3.A.9) and (3.A.10),
A I K
I
LI
BA
w a
u
g
rms

The area product AP
A A
w
g

; hence, solving for AP and converting dimensions to 
centimeters,
11.
AP
A A
LII
IK B
w
g
a
u


rms
10
4
(3.A.11)
In continuous-current choke applications, the peak current amplitude I is very close to the 
rms current I
rms
; hence, I I
I
rms
r

2
. Further, for most practical applications, the current 
density I
a
, packing factor K
u
, and peak flux density 
ˆ
B can be considered constant. Hence, 
Eq. (3.A.11) relates the area product to the stored energy, 12
2
/ (
) .
LI K
The nomogram shown in Fig. 3.1.2 was developed assuming that the current density 
was such as to give a temperature rise of 30°C in free air cooling conditions. Further, the 
packing factor K
u
is assumed to be constant at 0.6 (nominal for a single winding of round 
wire), and the peak flux density is assumed to be 0.25 T.
It has been shown1,2 that a choke with an area product of 1 will have a temperature rise 
of approximately 30°C in free air at a winding current density I
a
of 450 A/cm2. With larger 
cores the current density must be decreased, as the ratio of volume to surface area decreases 
with size.
Hence with larger cores the current density I
a
should be reduced as follows:
12.
I
AP
a

450
00125
2
. .
A/cm
(3.A.12)
Substituting for IbK
u
,
, and I
a
in Eq. (3.A.11) gives for a 30°C temperature rise the special 
case for AP of
13.
AP
LI

r
r
r
¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
2
4
1143
4
10
450 0 6 0 25
.
.
.
cm
(3.A.13)
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDER TOROIDAL CORES
3.57
A family of curves of AP developed from Eq. (3.A.13) for various values of inductance L
plotted against load current is shown in Fig. 3.1.2.
3.A.2. FURTHER USEFUL DERIVATIONS
Energy Storage
From Eq. (3.A.7),
J
BHl A
g g

1
2
From Eq. (3.A.3),
14.
H
B
r

M M
0
Substituting Eq. (3.A.3) into Eq. (3.A.7),
J
B A l
g g
r

2
0
2M M
joules
(3.A.14)
ButA l
g g
ʉ  volume of air gap (or volume of core and air gap where l
m
is total mean length of 
magnetic path, A
e
is effective area of core, and μ
r
is permeability of core plus gap). Hence, 
in general, the energy density is
15.
Jm
B
r
/
joules/m
3
3
2
0
2

M M
(3.A.15)
Or for the air gap only (since 
M
r
1),
J m
B
/
joules/m
3
3
2
0
2

M
3.A.3. INDUCTANCE
From Eq. (3.A.8),
1
2
1
2
2
LI
BH A l
g g

But from (3.A.5)
I
Hl
N
g

3.58
PART 3
Hence (substituting for I2)
16.
L BH A l
N
H l
BN A
H l
g g
g
g
g


2
2 2
2
2 2
(3.A.16)
Substitute M M
r 0
for B/H from Eq. (3.A.3):
17.
L
N A
l
r
g
g

MM
0
2
H
(3.A.17)
3.59
DERIVATION OF PACKING 
AND RESISTANCE FACTORS
The nomogram shown in Fig. 3.1.3 is developed from the basic physical parameters of the 
core and former.
3.B.1. MAXIMUM TURNS
For choke applications, a fully wound bobbin is normally used so as to obtain the maxi-
mum energy storage with minimum copper loss. The aim is to use the smallest core 
that will just provide the required inductance with an acceptable temperature rise and 
minimum voltage drop.
The stored energy J is 
1
2
2
LI  joules. To maximize J with a defined maximum load 
current, L must be maximum. Further, for a defined core size and material, L
sN
2
, and 
hence the number of turns must be maximum.
However, the larger the number of turns, the greater the copper loss and temperature 
rise. Hence, to obtain the optimum inductance on a particular core size, a compromise must 
be made between temperature rise and inductance.
3.B.2. PACKING FACTOR K
U
The window area of the core cannot be fully utilized for winding copper because of the need 
for a bobbin and insulation. Further, the wire shape and wastage mean that only part of the 
available space is occupied by copper.
In chokes, a single winding is normally used, and the need for insulation is mini-
mal. The nomogram assumes that round wires will be used, and the ratio of a round 
conductor to the occupied rectangle is 
P
P
() ( )
.
.
r
r
2
2
2
4 0 785
/
 /

In the middle of the 
wire range (#20 AWG), if heavy-grade insulation is used, the ratio of the copper area 
to the overall wire area is 0.83 (the remainder being taken up by the wire insulation). 
This reduces K
u
to 0.65, and to allow a margin for end wastage and insulation, a pack-
ing factor K
u
of 0.6 will be used. If the wire is to be wound on a bobbin, this packing 
factor must be applied to the usable window area of the bobbin a
wb
rather than to the 
window area of the core.
APPENDIX 3.B
3.59
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested