c# pdf reader table : Delete pages from a pdf SDK software API .net winforms wpf sharepoint Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi53-part523

3.70
PART 3
where N  mininum turns
V winding voltage, Vrms
f mininum frequency, Hz
ˆ
B
 peak flux density, T (Note: 10,000 G  1 T)
A
e
 effective core area, mm2
This formula indicates that turns N and frequency f are inversely proportional, and on this 
basis it could be assumed that doubling the frequency would halve the number of turns, 
leading to a much smaller transformer. However, in practice this does not occur, as most 
core materials show a rapid increase in core loss as the frequency increases. Consequently, 
to maintain core and copper losses nearly equal (for maximum efficiency), a much smaller 
flux density excursion is used at the higher frequency, and B will be reduced. 
Since the number of turns cannot be reduced as much as may have been expected, 
the anticipated reduction in core size will not be fully realized, unless special low-loss 
high-frequency ferrites are used in the higher-frequency application. Manufacturers are 
constantly improving the performance of their ferrite materials, and the designer would 
do well to investigate the latest materials and optimum flux density swing where high-
frequency operation is required.
4.10 FLUX DENSITY SWING 5B
For maximum efficiency, the flux density swing $B should be selected such that the core 
loss is about equal to the copper loss. Unfortunately, this optimum selection is not always 
possible, as core saturation may limit the flux density swing to a lower value. 
Figure 2.2.3 shows the normal saturation characteristic of Siemens N27 ferrite mate-
rial at 20°C and 100°C. It should be noted that to allow a working margin, the peak flux 
density should not exceed 250 mT. (In push-pull this would be a maximum flux density 
swing $B of 500 mT peak-to-peak.) 
Figure 3.4.2 shows a plot of copper loss, core loss, and total loss for an EC41 core 
and bobbin, when operated at 20 kHz and 50 kHz with output powers of 150 and 210 W, 
as a function of flux density swing. (This design is covered in Chap. 5.) At 20 kHz the 
maximum efficiency occurs near where the core and copper losses are equal, giving a total 
loss of 2 W and a temperature rise of 30°C for this size core. The flux density swing for 
optimum efficiency at 20 kHz is 320 mT peak-to-peak. 
For 50-kHz operation, to obtain the same core loss (and hence temperature rise), the 
flux density swing must be reduced to 180 mT. However, the frequency has increased by 
more than the reduction in flux density, so the turns will be fewer. The reduction in number 
of turns and increase in wire size reduce the copper winding resistance, allowing a larger 
winding current for the same copper loss. The transformed power may be increased to 210 W 
to give the same copper loss and temperature rise as in the previous 20-kHz example. 
Hence, increasing the frequency results in a net increase in the transformer power rating, 
but a reduction in optimum flux density swing. 
It is clear from Fig. 3.4.2 that for optimum efficiency, the flux density swing must be 
quite carefully selected to suit the operating frequency, power output, and permitted tem-
perature rise. The total transformer loss will be equivalent to twice the core or copper loss 
when the transformer is designed for optimum efficiency, since core and copper loss are 
nearly equal at this optimum condition. 
Figure 3.4.4 shows the flux density swing $B as a function of core loss for N27 ferrite, 
with frequency as a parameter, in the range 5 to 200 kHz. The recommendations shown 
in Fig. 3.4.3 provide a good starting point for the selection of flux density swing $B.
Delete pages from a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf file; delete blank page from pdf
Delete pages from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.71
Remember, in push-pull applications the peak flux density will be only half the total swing, 
provided that the sweep is centered. (See the discussions of staircase saturation and flux 
doubling effects in Chaps. 6 and 7.) 
In single-ended forward converters, only the first quadrant of the B/H loop is utilized. 
With ferrite materials at low frequencies (below 40 kHz and 100 W), even if the total 
available flux excursion is fully utilized, it is unlikely that the core loss will be equal to the 
copper loss for normal core geometry. A design of this type is said to be saturation-limited. 
Further, unless current-mode control (or one of the special input voltage compensated con-
trol chips) is used, the working flux density in the forward converter may need to be further 
FIG. 3.4.4 Core loss for N27 ferrite material as a function of flux density swing and frequency. 
(Siemens AG.) 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page in pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages android; delete page numbers in pdf
3.72
PART 3
reduced to prevent saturation during start-up or transient operation. (During start-up, maxi-
mum volt-second conditions could well be applied to the core.) 
In push-pull applications (full-bridge and half-bridge) at low frequencies, the full B/H
characteristic range can in theory be utilized. However, once again, this flux density swing 
may need to be reduced to prevent saturation during start-up and transient operating condi-
tions. Current-mode control overcomes these start-up and transient limitations, allowing 
a larger flux density swing to be utilized. Various methods of controlling transient and 
start-up conditions are discussed in the appropriate converter sections. In high-frequency 
applications, the flux density swing may be very much limited by the optimum efficiency 
requirements, and special soft-start circuits may not be required. The converter topology, 
method of operation, power output, and frequency must be considered before selecting the 
operating flux density swing. 
4.11 THE IMPACT OF AGENCY SPECIFICATIONS 
ON TRANSFORMER SIZE 
The need to meet insulation and creepage distance requirements, where UL and VDE 
specifications are to be satisfied, can prevent the realization of smaller transformer sizes 
at higher frequencies. The specified 4- to 8-mm creepage distance (the minimum distance 
between primary and secondary windings for offline applications) must be maintained even 
in high-frequency transformers. This results in very poor utilization of the window area and 
an increase in leakage inductance, particularly when smaller cores are used. The effect is 
to force the selection of a larger core than the electrical and temperature rise requirements 
would normally demand. (See Fig. 3.4.9.) 
4.12 CALCULATION OF PRIMARY TURNS 
Once the core size has been selected, the number of primary turns must be selected for 
optimum efficiency. To minimize copper losses, the tendency would be to use the small-
est possible number of primary turns. However, provided that the frequency and voltage 
remain constant, the smaller the number of primary turns, the larger the flux density swing 
demanded from the core material. In the limit, the core will saturate. A second effect of 
reducing turns and increasing the flux density swing will be to increase the core losses to a 
point where they may become the predominant loss. 
As previously explained, the optimum efficiency will be found where the copper losses 
and core losses are approximately equal. In push-pull transformers at high frequencies, the 
need to satisfy this optimum efficiency requirement will define the maximum flux density 
swing and hence the minimum number of primary turns. Such a design is said to be core-
loss limited. 
At low frequencies, particularly with single-ended converters, the core loss will be much 
less than the copper loss, and the factor limiting the minimum number of primary turns will 
be the need to prevent core saturation. Such designs are said to be saturation-limited. 
Core saturation must be avoided at all costs. The impedance of the primary windings 
in the saturated region will fall to a value close to the DC winding resistance. This low 
resistance will allow damagingly high currents to flow in the transformer primary, with 
inevitable failure of the primary switching elements. 
Because the primary waveform in switchmode converters is a square or quasi-square 
wave, a modified form of the classic transformer equation (derived from Faraday’s law) 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete a page from a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.73
may be used to relate primary or secondary turns to the core parameters and transformer 
operating parameters. In this equation the turns are related to the applied volt-seconds as 
follows: 
N
Vt
BA
c

$
where N  primary turns
V DC voltage applied to winding when the switching device is “on”
t “on” time of half period, μs
$B  maximum flux density swing, Tesla
A
c
 core cross-sectional area, mm2
Note: In saturation-limited designs, the minimum core area A
c
, should be used to prevent 
saturation of any part of the core. In core-loss-limited designs. the effective core area Ae
should be used to more correctly reflect the bulk core loss.
Under steady-state conditions, each cycle is identical, and a single period is sufficient to 
define the operating parameters. From the preceding equation, it will be noted that the pri-
mary turns Nis directly proportional to the primary voltage V and the time t that the voltage 
is applied to the primary windings. It is inversely proportional to the flux density swing $B
and the core cross-sectional area A
c
.
It would now seem to be a simple matter to establish the primary turns by inserting the 
appropriate constants into this equation. However, a further complication now arises in the 
selection of the constants.
In some voltage-controlled converter circuits, it is possible, under start-up or transient 
conditions, for the maximum primary voltage and maximum “on” period to coincide. If 
this type of converter topology is used, to prevent saturation of the core, the maximum 
primary voltage and maximum “on” period must be used in the equation to calculate the 
primary turns. 
If current-mode control is used, the onset of core saturation is controlled, and the maxi-
mum “on” time will only coincide with the minimum primary voltage; thus, these values 
will be used in the equation to calculate the primary turns. This will result in a smaller 
number of turns in a saturation-limited design. 
Some duty-ratio-controlled systems apply primary input voltage feedforward compen-
sation, fast primary current limiting, or slew rate control. In such cases, the same conditions 
as for current-mode control will apply to the transformer design. 
In push-pull applications, a saturation problem can arise on initial start-up. The flux 
excursion for the first half cycle will be in the first or third quadrant of the B/H loop only. 
(The core will have restored to the remanent flux density B
r
near zero when the supply 
was previously turned off.) Unless precautions are taken to limit the flux excursion for the 
first few cycles of operation (soft start) or current-mode control is employed, the push-
pull transformer can saturate on the first half cycle (the so-called “flux doubling effect”). 
If soft start or current-mode control is not used, the transformer must be designed for a 
smaller flux swing, resulting in an increased number of primary turns. Hence, to realize 
the improved efficiency that is normally possible with push-pull transformers because of 
their larger flux density swing, appropriate soft-start methods, slew-rate control, or current-
mode control techniques must be used to prevent core saturation during start-up.
Remember, under steady-state conditions in the push-pull transformer, it should be pos-
sible to swing the flux density from the positive first quadrant through to the negative third 
quadrant, doubling the possible flux excursion compared with the single-ended transformer. 
In the ideal case, this would halve the number of primary turns and improve the transformer 
efficiency. In practice, it is usually not possible to utilize this full flux density swing, as 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages from a pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete page pdf online; best pdf editor delete pages
3.74
PART 3
some margin must be provided for start-up and transient operation, and at high frequencies 
the potential increase in flux excursion may be limited by core loss considerations. 
For core-loss-limited applications using N27 or similar transformer ferrite materials, 
select a value of flux density swing, as recommended in Fig. 3.4.3, for initial design pur-
poses. For other materials, calculate the loss permitted for the temperature rise required 
[Eq. 4.A.16 or 4.A.18]. Select a flux density swing to give a core loss of half this value (in 
an optimum design, the other half will be used for copper loss). The manufacturer’s core 
material loss curves will provide core loss and flux density swing information, and the 
optimum flux density swing can be established.
After all these aspects are considered, the appropriate constants are entered in the equa-
tion and the number of primary turns calculated.
4.13 CALCULATING SECONDARY TURNS 
When the number of primary turns has been calculated, the number of secondary turns 
may be established from the primary-to-secondary voltage ratio. In buck-derived convert-
ers, the secondary voltage will exceed the output voltage as defined by the duty ratio. A 
further allowance must be made for diode drop and choke voltage drop. These calculations 
are usually made for minimum input voltage and maximum pulse width. Some adjust-
ment of primary turns may be required to eliminate partial secondary turns; in the case of 
saturation-limited designs, the turns adjustment must be to the next higher integer. 
In  closed-loop  converter topologies that employ  current-mode control, or  in  duty 
ratio systems with primary voltage pulse-width compensation, the primary voltage-“on” 
time product, V
dc
t
on
, remains constant as a result of the control circuit action. It is often 
more expedient in this case to calculate the secondary turns first so as to avoid partial 
turns. Since the output voltage is maintained constant by the control loop, it has a defined 
(known) value. This output voltage and the maximum “on” period will occur at minimum 
input voltage, and these values would be used in the equation to calculate the minimum 
number of secondary turns. It should be remembered that in saturation-limited designs, the 
number of turns established from the equation is the minimum number of turns that may 
be used, and any rounding process to eliminate partial turns must result in an increase in 
turns rather than a decrease. In core-loss-limited designs, the rounding process may be in 
either direction, increasing or decreasing the core loss as desired. 
In multiple-output applications, the number of secondary turns for the lowest output 
voltage is normally calculated first. The normal requirement is that partial turns must 
be avoided, and so this winding is rounded to the nearest integer. (In saturation-limited 
designs this would be the next higher integer.) The primary turns and the remaining sec-
ondary turns are then scaled accordingly. 
4.14 HALF TURNS 
Where E cores  are  used, special  techniques can  be  employed for half-turn  require-
ments on major outputs. (See Sec. 4.23.) For low-power auxiliary outputs, half turns are 
sometimes used on the center pole or core legs, and in this event a small gap must be 
introduced in each leg of the transformer, to ensure good coupling to the half turn and 
reduce flux imbalance in the outer legs. (Typically a gap of 0.1 mm would be sufficient.) 
Alternatively, external inductors may be used for the adjustment of auxiliary voltages. 
(See Part 1, Chap. 22.) 
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete page from pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page in pdf document; delete page in pdf
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.75
4.15 WIRE SIZES 
The selection of primary and secondary wire gauges and the overall winding topology 
is a most important and often the most difficult part of the transformer design. A large 
number of practical and electrical parameters control the choice of winding topology and 
wire size. 
The initial selection of the core size was based upon a wire current density to give 
a 30°C temperature rise. One approach in selecting wire size is to calculate the current 
density required to meet this criterion [from Eq. 4.A.12] and hence obtain the required 
cross-sectional area of the wire. However, at this stage, the “die has already been cast,” 
because the core size has been selected. Hence the winding window area is already defined 
by the bobbin. 
To maintain the primary and secondary losses equal, the winding area occupied by a 
primary should be the same as that occupied by the secondary. It was initially assumed 
that 40% to 50% of the available bobbin window area would be occupied by copper 
(25% each for primary and secondary), the remainder of the window space being occu-
pied by space between windings (because round wire is used) and the insulation and 
screening between primaries and secondaries. Since the numbers of primary and sec-
ondary turns are known, it is better at this stage to select a wire size that will make the 
best use of the available window area. However, before this can be done, it is necessary 
to make an assessment of the winding topology, and to consider the implications of skin 
and proximity effects. At low frequency the complete window will be used, but at high 
frequencies with push-pull operation, lower losses may result from using thinner wire 
and fewer layers because of the improved F
r
ratio. In this case not all the window area 
will be used. (The F
r
ratio is the ratio of the effective ac resistance of the wire to its DC 
resistance. See Appendix 4.B.)
4.16 SKIN EFFECTS AND OPTIMUM WIRE 
THICKNESS 
Before the final wire gauge can be selected, skin and proximity effects must be consid-
ered. (See Appendix 4.B.) In simple terms, at high frequencies, the combined effects of 
the internal field within the wire and the proximity of fields from adjacent turns force the 
current to flow in a thin skin at the conductor surface, and to the edges of the conductor
farthest from adjacent turns. In a simple open wire, this thin surface conduction layer 
is annular, with a thickness called the “penetration depth” $. The penetration depth is 
frequency-dependent, and the current density will have fallen to approximately 37% at a 
depth defined by 
$
66
f
where $  penetration depth, mm
f frequency, Hz
Hence in the simple (open wire) case, if the radius of the wire exceeds the penetration 
depth, there will be a poor copper utilization factor, giving excessive copper losses.
In the transformer, the situation is more complex because of the fields from adjacent 
windings; hence, the winding topology plays an important role in the selection of wire size. 
3.76
PART 3
The proximity of adjacent wires and layers forces the current into an even smaller area at 
the edges of the wire, so that the effective conduction area is further reduced. Therefore, 
when more than one layer is used, the wire size should be further reduced. 
In practice, the minimum F
r
ratio (the ratio of the effective ac resistance to the DC 
resistance) will approach a minimum of 1.5 in a well-designed winding. To achieve this, 
the wire diameter or strip thickness must be optimized for the operating frequency and 
number of layers. Figures 3.4.5 and 3.4.6 indicate the maximum wire diameter (as a single 
FIG. 3.4.5 Optimum wire gauge (AWG) and diameter (mm) as a function of the number of effective layers 
in the winding, with frequency as a parameter.
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.77
strand) or maximum strip thickness that should be used in the transformer winding, as a 
function of the number of effective layers, with frequency as a parameter, to give an F
r
ratio of 1.5. 
If the cross-sectional area of the wire that would just fill the available window space, 
or the size indicated by the current density, exceeds the size indicated by Fig. 3.4.5 or 
3.4.6, then two or more wires should be used to make up a cable of the appropriate 
cross-sectional area. These multifilament windings are best applied as a single multifilar 
layer. For very high frequency applications, the specially woven Litz wire should be 
considered.
FIG. 3.4.6 Optimum copper strip thickness (mm) as a function of the number of effective full-width layers 
in the winding, with frequency as a parameter. 
3.78
PART 3
Finally, the size of the cable should be adjusted to give an integer number of com-
plete layers per winding. The selection should favor the minimum number of layers, 
since a reduction in number of layers improves the F
r
ratio (somewhat compensating for 
the increased resistance of the smaller cable). Also, fewer layers will reduce the leakage 
inductance.
The effective F
r
ratios for wires that are less than the diameter used for an F
r
ratio of 1.5 
are shown in Fig. 3.4.7.
4.17 WINDING TOPOLOGY
The winding topology has a considerable influence on the performance and reliability of 
the final transformer. 
FIG. 3.4.7 The F
r
ratio (ac/DC resistance ratio), as a function of a percentage 
of optimum thickness for an F
r
ratio of 1.5, for wire or strip sizes less than 
optimum thickness. 
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.79
To reduce leakage inductance, and proximity and skin effects to acceptable limits, 
the use of sandwich winding construction is almost inevitable in high-frequency trans-
formers. 
Figure 3.4.8a shows the distribution of magnetomotive force (mmf) in a simple 
wound transformer, and Fig. 3.4.8b, that in a sandwiched wound transformer. In the 
simple winding, the primary magnetizing mmf builds up with increasing ampere-turns 
to a maximum at the primary-to-secondary interface. The secondary ampere-turns are 
nearly equal and opposite, reducing the mmf to zero at the outer limits of the wind-
ing. Large values of mmf increase proximity effects and leakage inductance. In the 
sandwiched windings, the maximum mmf is reduced; it is zero in the center of the 
windings. 
FIG. 3.4.8 (a) and (b) Distribution of magnetization force in simple and sandwiched transformer winding 
topologies. (c) Makeup of a sandwiched (split) winding topology, showing the position of windings, safety 
screens, and RFI screens.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested