c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf online application Library tool html asp.net wpf online Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi54-part524

3.80
PART 3
4.17.1 Effective Layers 
The effective layers referred to in Figs. 3.4.5 and 3.4.6 are the number of layers between a 
plane of zero mmf and a plane of maximum mmf. Hence, in the case of the secondary wind-
ing in the sandwiched construction of Fig. 3.4.8b, the effective layers are only half the total 
number of secondary layers, because a zero mmf occurs in the center of the winding. 
Since the maximum mmf and proximity effects are lower in the sandwiched construc-
tion, the copper losses and leakage inductance are reduced. If the secondary is a single 
layer, giving an effective half layer, the wire or strip may be twice as thick as the optimum 
given for a single layer in Fig. 3.4.5 or 3.4.6. 
In sandwiched construction, the normal design approach is to split the primary into two 
halves with the secondary windings sandwiched between them, as shown in Fig. 3.4.8c.
In some multiple-output applications, particularly those in which the secondary wind-
ings have low-voltage, high-current, relatively constant loads, there is some advantage in 
splitting the secondary windings into two sections, with the primary in the middle. In this 
second arrangement, the winding carrying the highest secondary current would be placed 
close to the core, as the mean turn length will be smaller, resulting in lower copper losses. 
A second advantage of this topology is that windings that are close to the core will now 
have lower ac voltages, reducing the RFI coupling from primary to core, secondary, and 
case. However, this approach should be used with caution, because the secondary wind-
ings must be selected for equal ampere-turns loading above and below the primary and the 
loads must be constant; otherwise large leakage inductances can occur. 
In this example the primary has been split into two equal parts, one above and one 
below the secondary windings. Four screens have been incorporated between the primary 
and secondary windings. The screens adjacent to the primary, S1 and S4, are Faraday 
screens, fitted to reduce RFI coupling between the high-voltage primary windings and 
the safety screens S2 and S3. The Faraday screens are connected to the primary common 
line, to return capacitively coupled RFI currents to the primary circuit. The safety screens 
S2 and S3 are connected to the chassis or ground line, to isolate secondary outputs from 
the primary circuit in the event of an insulation failure. These screens, although necessary 
to meet safety and emission requirements, occupy considerable space and increase the 
primary-to-secondary leakage inductance. (See Sec. 4.22.)
After deciding on the winding topology, calculate the space occupied by screens and 
insulation. The remaining space is then available for primary and secondary windings.
Some further constraints are placed upon the winding design. 
It is preferable that windings occupy an integer number of layers. In the case of the 
split primary winding, the number of layers should be even to allow equal splitting of 
the half primaries. Partly wound layers are both inefficient in the use of the winding 
space and promote insulation breakdown where the terminating wire is brought across 
the top of the underlying layers. Since the volts per turn can be quite large in high-
frequency transformers, a terminating wire that spans several turns will be subjected to a 
higher breakdown voltage stress. Further, the terminating wire is subject to considerable 
mechanical stress, because it forms a discontinuity or “bump” in the winding, and the 
remaining layers apply considerable pressure to this bump. Most insulation breakdown 
failures in switching transformers can be traced to this type of winding discontinuity or 
to bad termination practices in which wires are crossed over each other. Good winding 
practice dictates that all layers should be complete, that terminating wires be brought out 
with additional insulation, and that terminating wires not cross over other windings or 
terminating wires wherever practical. 
To meet the creepage distance and spacing requirements demanded by VDE, UL, IEC, 
and CSA specifications, it is necessary to leave a creepage distance of up to 8 mm between 
the primary and secondary windings. (See Fig. 3.4.9a, b, and c.)
Delete pages pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages pdf online
Delete pages pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf reader
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.81
To meet the creepage distance requirement more easily, it is good practice to terminate 
primary windings on one side of the bobbin and secondary windings on the other. This 
also has the advantage that primary and secondary terminating wires are well separated. 
At high frequencies, where window space is limited, the technique shown in Fig. 3.4.9b
may help. If a grounded safety screen is fitted, the creepage distance may be reduced to 3 
mm (see Fig. 3.4.9c). The screen must be connected to ground (chassis) and rated to carry 
the maximum fault current to clear fuses or other protective devices. 
Although the design intention is to occupy the space equally with primary and second-
ary windings, some deviation from this equality is acceptable, as an increase in loss in the 
primary will be partially compensated by a decrease of loss in the secondary, or vice versa. 
FIG. 3.4.9 (a), (b), and (c) Some methods of insulation and winding arrangements, meeting safety 
creepage distance requirements, in agency approved types of transformer makeup.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf file online
3.82
PART 3
The overall efficiency of the transformer is not greatly compromised by small deviations 
from the ideal, although the hot spot within the greatest loss winding will be somewhat 
higher in a nonbalanced situation. 
It has been shown that the selection of wire size is a complex choice defined by 
many practical and electrical considerations. It is incumbent on the transformer design 
engineer to either wind or closely supervise the winding of the prototype transformer, 
to ensure that it is a practical proposition and that his design intentions have been fully 
satisfied. 
The layout of the printed circuit board should conform with the ideal transformer pin 
terminations, rather than the reverse. 
In the final analysis, core losses and copper losses should be calculated to check that 
the design is fully optimized. Several iterations may be necessary to achieve optimum 
performance.
4.18 TEMPERATURE RISE 
Under convection-cooled conditions, the temperature rise depends on the total internal loss 
and surface area. The original design aim was a temperature rise of 30°C, and this should be 
checked by calculating the losses, and hence the temperature rise, in the final design. 
4.18.1 Core Loss 
The core loss depends on the core material, flux density swing, frequency, and core size. 
Figure 3.4.4 shows the core loss for a typical transformer ferrite (Siemens N27). In this 
example the loss is given in terms of milliwatts per gram against flux density swing $B with 
operating frequency as a parameter.
Most loss diagrams assume push-pull operation and are plotted for peak flux density. 
They assume a symmetrical flux swing about the origin, and the losses are plotted for 
a flux density swing of twice the peak value 
ˆ
B. When calculating core loss for a single-
ended converter using such diagrams, divide the transformer flux density swing by 2 
and enter the graph with this as the peak value to obtain the core loss for single-ended 
applications.
4.18.2 Copper Loss 
The copper loss depends on the winding resistance, the F
r
ratio (ac to DC resistance ratio), 
and the rms current.
Figure 3.4.10 gives the rms conversions for the more common converter waveforms; 
Table 3.1.1, the standard winding data; and Fig. 3.4.11, the temperature-resistance correc-
tion factors. 
The DC winding resistance is calculated for the total winding length, using the mean 
turn length for each section of the winding, turns, and wire gauge. This DC resistance is 
then multiplied by the F
r
ratio, obtained from Fig. 3.4.7 or 3.4B.1, and the copper tem-
perature resistance factor, from Fig. 3.4.11, to obtain the effective ac resistance R
e
at the 
operating frequency and estimated working temperature.
P
I R W
w
e

rms
2
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf files; copy page from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages pdf document; delete a page from a pdf online
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.83
where P
w
 winding copper loss, W
I
rms
 rms winding current, A
R
e
 effective ac resistance of winding, 7
The copper losses should be calculated for each winding to check for reasonable loss dis-
tribution. The sum of copper and core losses gives the total transformer loss.
4.18.3 Temperature Rise Nomogram 
The temperature rise  may be checked using the area product-surface area-temperature 
nomogram shown in Fig. 3.1.7.
FIG. 3.4.10 Common switchmode power converter waveforms, showing effective rms and DC values. 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete page on pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page on pdf document; delete blank pages in pdf
3.84
PART 3
Enter the top of the nomogram with the area product AP. The nearest horizontal to the 
intersect with the dashed “AP line” gives the surface area to the left. Enter the lower scale 
with the total loss, and the nearest diagonal to the intersect with the surface area line gives 
the temperature rise.
Alternatively, calculate the temperature rise from Eq. (4.A.16) or (4.A.18): 
$ 
n
T
P
A
t
s
800
C
or
$ 
n
T
P
AP
t
23 .5
C
where $T  temperature rise, °C
P
t
 total internal power loss, W
A
s
 surface area, cm2
AP  area product, cm4
This approximate formula holds well for temperatures in the range 20 to 50°C. 
FIG. 3.4.11 Copper resistance factor as a function of temperature, showing ratio of resistance 
at temperature T compared with that at 20°C.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page in pdf reader; delete pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete pages in pdf; delete pdf pages
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.85
4.19 EFFICIENCY 
The efficiency H may be established in the normal way from the calculated losses and 
transferred power. 
H
r
output power
100
output power losses
%
4.20 HIGHER TEMPERATURE RISE DESIGNS 
Where a temperature rise in excess of 30°C is permitted, the design process used in Fig. 3.1.7 
may be reversed, giving a smaller transformer with a higher temperature rise. 
In this case, enter Fig. 3.1.7 with the required area product and establish the horizontal 
surface area line. The intercept with the required (higher) temperature rise gives the per-
mitted total dissipation. For an optimum design, the core loss will be half this value, and 
Fig. 3.4.4 gives the optimum flux density swing for this core loss. 
The transformer design example shown in Sec. 3.5 illustrates the design procedure. 
4.21 ELIMINATING BREAKDOWN STRESS IN 
BIFILAR WINDINGS 
In a bifilar winding, two or more insulated magnet wires are wound together, in parallel, 
to give independent windings. These windings, although isolated, are closely magnetically 
coupled.
Bifilar windings on high-voltage converters are a source of potential breakdown, so 
this technique should be limited to low-voltage applications. No problem exists where 
wires are eventually to be connected in parallel to form a multifilar winding, or where the 
stress voltage between isolated windings is low. 
A typical bifilar winding application would be the energy recovery winding in a sin-
gle-ended forward converter. In some configurations an energy recovery winding will 
be required to restore the transformer during the flyback period and recover the flyback 
energy. A bifilar winding will normally be preferred, since any leakage inductance between 
the main winding and the flyback winding will result in an excessive voltage overshoot on 
the collector of the switching device.
In off-line applications, it is common practice to provide a bifilar-wound energy recov-
ery winding on the primary of the transformer. However, this winding is a possible cause 
of failure, since a high stress voltage exists between adjacent turns of the two windings. 
If there is a weak point anywhere in the insulation covering, this is a potential cause of 
failure. Although the insulation on the magnet wire may be rated at several thousand volts, 
a single flaw along the length of the winding can result in breakdown, since the voltage 
stress, at all points, is considerable. Moreover, careless winding techniques that allow two 
bifilar wires to cross will result in high mechanical stress at the crossover point, which 
may cause failure under high-temperature conditions. 
Hence, if bifilar windings are considered essential, only the best-quality high-temperature 
insulating materials should be used, and considerable care must be taken in winding, insu-
lation, and material handling. The operatives should understand the problem. 
In the above example, separating the windings into two isolated and insulated layers 
would normally be unacceptable because of the increase in leakage inductance. However, 
it is possible, by suitable circuit techniques, to obtain good performance without the 
3.86
PART 3
need to bifilar-wind the energy recovery winding. One such technique (discussed in Part 2, 
Sec. 8.5) will be used as an example here. 
As shown in Fig. 2.8.1, a separate energy recovery winding (not bifilar-wound) may be 
used without the leakage inductance becoming a problem if the energy recovery diode D3 
is placed in the top end of the energy recovery winding. A capacitor C
c
links the junction of 
this diode and winding to the collector of the switching transistor Q1. The two equal turns 
windings on the transformer are on separate layers, isolated from each other, so inevitably 
there will be some leakage inductance between them. 
During a cycle of operations, if no leakage inductance were present, the starts of the 
two windings would exactly track each other (with DC offset of V
cc
), so that the voltage 
across the capacitor C
c
would remain constant at the supply voltage. However, the leakage 
inductance will tend to produce voltage spikes, but any tendency for the collector voltage 
to overshoot is now very effectively clamped by the path provided through C
c
and D3. 
The value of C
c
is chosen to be large compared with the transferred energy so that the 
voltage change across C
c
during a clamping period will be insignificant. 
In this topology, although the leakage inductance has not been eliminated, it is no 
longer a problem. The energy stored in the leakage inductance is returned to the supply 
line through C
c
and D3 during the turn-off transient. (This is more fully explained in Sec. 
8.5 of Part 2.) 
Using this circuit topology, the transformer reliability problems that would have been 
inherent with a high-voltage bifilar winding have been eliminated. This example dem-
onstrates the importance of integrating the circuit and transformer design processes if 
optimum designs are to be produced. 
4.22 RFI SCREENS AND SAFETY SCREENS 
To prevent RF currents flowing from primary to secondary or ground through the inter-
winding capacitance, it is necessary to fit a screen against the primary windings. This 
should be connected to the common input point to return capacitively coupled currents to 
the primary. This common point will usually be either the positive or the negative high-
voltage input line. 
Since this is not a safety screen, very thin copper screen material can and should be 
used. Thick copper is not the best selection, as its low resistance gives a large eddy-current 
loss. For this application, a higher-resistance nonmagnetic material, such as phosphor 
bronze or manganin, should be considered. Also, minimum-thickness insulation should 
be used. Excessive buildup in the screens and insulation should be avoided to minimize 
leakage inductance. 
In high-voltage or “off-line” applications, a further safety screen should be provided 
between the RFI screen and the secondary. This screen, together with its terminating wire, 
must be of sufficient gauge to carry the fusing current of the supply (a safety regula-
tion requirement). Insulation type and thickness must be selected to meet specified safety 
requirements, Where  both screens are fitted, some reduction in the overall insulation 
requirements may be obtained by isolating the RFI screen from the input supply common 
point with an approved high-voltage series capacitor. A value of 0.01 μF is adequate, and 
the voltage rating should be as required by the specified safety regulations. The total insu-
lation thickness for all screens then becomes accountable for safety requirements. 
Where high-voltage isolated secondary outputs are required, it may be necessary to 
provide a third screen to return the capacitively coupled output winding to screen currents 
back to the appropriate output winding. Fortunately, in most cases this third screen is not 
essential, because in most applications the output winding common is connected either 
directly or through a low-impedance capacitor to the safety ground (chassis).
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.87
Note: Such connections or capacitors must be fitted as closely as possible between the 
safety screen and the offending output winding to reduce the length of the circulating cur-
rent path.
The ends of the screens must be suitably insulated to prevent a shorted turn, and the 
minimum overlap should be used to minimize the overlap capacitance. (Note that at high 
frequencies a large overlap capacitance will make the screen look like a shorted turn.) 
The screen terminating wire should be taken from the center of the screen to minimize 
the inductive coupling of the screen return currents. (Capacitively induced but inductively 
coupled screen currents then cancel as they flow in opposite directions in each half of the 
screen winding.) These second-order effects are more important at higher frequencies. 
4.23 TRANSFORMER HALF-TURN TECHNIQUES 
In some applications, it would be an advantage to be able to adjust the transformer windings 
to the nearest half turn. 
However, the simple expedient of winding half a turn on the center pole of an E core at 
best results in poor coupling to the half turn and bad transformer regulation and under some 
conditions can cause saturation of one leg of the transformer core. 
An analysis of this simple half-turn arrangement (see Fig. 3.4.12a and b) shows that 
it is similar to placing a turn on one leg of the transformer core, since the external current 
loop must be closed back to the start of the main winding eventually (even though it may 
be via the external circuit). In Fig. 3.4.12, a turn and a half is shown, but the effect is the 
same. Since under balanced conditions, half the flux in the center pole can normally be 
expected to flow in each leg, the leg half turn would appear on first inspection to give the 
desired half flux linkage and hence half voltage coupling. However, as soon as any load 
is applied to this winding, a back mmf is generated, increasing the reluctance of the leg to 
which the half turn couples. (This is shown in Fig. 3.4.12b, leg C). 
Since a low-reluctance alternative path for the flux is presented in the other leg of the E 
core (path A), magnetic flux from the center pole will be redirected into this side and the 
apparent effective half-turn coupling will be lost; consequently, the voltage generated by 
the half turn will very quickly decay as the winding is loaded, giving poor regulation. 
The situation can be improved by gapping the core (including the outer legs), so that 
the difference in reluctance caused by the unbalanced mmf is swamped by the large reluc-
tance introduced by the air gap. In flyback converters, this air gap may already be the 
normal situation. Provided that the mmf generated by the half turn is small compared with 
the reluctance introduced by the air gap, then reasonable coupling to the half turn will be 
maintained, and for low-power auxiliary outputs, this simple half-turn winding with an air 
gap compensation may be quite satisfactory. 
However, for higher-power applications, the technique shown in Fig. 3.4.12c and d
should be adopted. An analysis of this arrangement shows that two half turns are now 
effectively applied to each leg of the transformer. The two half turns are connected in par-
allel and together experience half the flux of a full turn, so the induced voltage is half that 
of a full turn. These half turns are phased such that the back mmf will equal and oppose 
the prime flux in each leg, so that flux balancing is maintained irrespective of the loading. 
Regulation is now very good, and an air gap is not essential. 
For current transformers, this special half-turn arrangement can be particularly useful 
in high-current applications, since it will halve the secondary turns required. In this case, 
of course, the half turn would be the primary current winding, and the full turn shown on 
the center leg would not be required. 
By a similar process, X cores and some pot cores with four ports provide for balanced 
quarter turns. 
3.88
PART 3
FIG. 3.4.12(a) and (b) Diagram showing the loss of flux linkage, and flux imbalance, caused by one method 
(often used) of winding half turns on an E core transformer: (c) and (d) A special E core one-and-a-half-turn 
winding arrangement, giving good flux linkage with balanced core flux density operation. 
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.89
4.24 TRANSFORMER FINISHING AND VACUUM 
IMPREGNATION 
Wound components are resin-impregnated for three major reasons: 
1. To exclude moisture from the windings and prevent degradation of the insulation by 
fungicidal attack. 
2. To stabilize the position of the windings and prevent mechanical creepage and noise. 
3. To exclude air voids and provide a homogeneous mass for best thermal properties, to 
eliminate hot spots, and to prevent discontinuity in interwinding capacitance, eliminat-
ing corona-induced failure. 
A number of proprietary varnish and resin materials are available for this purpose, and 
care should be taken to select an approved material in accordance with the final specifica-
tions and operating temperature of the transformer. To ensure thorough impregnation of 
small wound components, a resin with a low viscosity should be chosen where possible. 
The wound bobbin should be thoroughly dry before encapsulation; an oven drying pro-
cess at 110°C for at least 4 h is recommended. This also tends to stabilize and anneal 
the windings and remove stresses that would otherwise be locked in by the encapsulation 
process.
4.24.1 Impregnation Problems with Ferrite Materials 
With ferrite materials and some grain-oriented iron materials, it is particularly important 
that the core not be included in the vacuum impregnation process. With some materials, 
there can be considerable degradation of the magnetic properties as a result of the mechani-
cal stresses set up by the hardening resin. Some cores must be free to magnetostrict, and this 
is particularly important with square-loop ferrite toroids and HCR tape wound cores. For 
this type of component, the resin finishing should be limited to the winding only. 
For square-loop toroids, it may be possible to eliminate the need for impregnation by 
using multifilar, thin-walled insulated wire in place of magnet wire. A high-temperature 
insulation is preferred, such as PTFE or irradiated PVC.
FIG. 3.4.12(Continued)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested