c# pdf reader table : Cut pages from pdf online Library software component asp.net winforms wpf mvc Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi55-part525

3.90
PART 3
Toroidal cores that have been Parylene coated are less susceptible to change when 
impregnated, as the Parylene coating, which is stress-free, prevents ingress of resin into 
the normally porous ferrite. 
Cores with bobbins can suffer additional problems because the varnish fills up the space pro-
vided for bobbin expansion. This causes further mechanical stress and possible breakage of the 
core at high temperatures because of the different rates of expansion of the various materials. 
In general, ferrites are not improved by varnish or resin, and vacuum impregnation should 
be limited to the winding and bobbin only, where possible. Expect considerable changes in the 
properties of the core material when impregnation of the complete transformer is unavoidable. 
If it is desired to suppress corona, impregnation will be ineffective unless vacuum is 
used. Vacuum impregnation removes microscopic air voids in which the corona forms. 
High-voltage stress testing should not be carried out until the winding has been dried out 
and the varnish or resin has been completely cured. 
4.25 PROBLEMS 
1. Why is it so important for the switchmode power supply designer to have a very good 
working grasp of the design of switchmode transformers? 
2. What is the difference between an AIEE class A and an AIEE class B transformer? 
3. Why is it difficult to relate transformer size directly to power throughput? 
4. What are the loss conditions normally assumed to give optimum transformer efficiency? 
5. Why does the choice of converter topology and rectifier arrangements affect trans-
former core size? 
6. What property of the core material normally defines the minimum number of primary 
turns on a medium- or low-frequency transformer? 
7. What property of the core material normally controls the number of primary turns in a 
high-frequency transformer design? 
8. Why is it often difficult to reduce the transformer size in direct-off-line converter appli-
cations, even when the operating frequency is very high? 
9. What are the basic steps that should be taken to reduce primary-to-secondary leakage 
inductance?
10. What is the core area product AP?
11.   In what way is the area product dimension useful in transformer design? 
12.   What would be the typical efficiency of an optimum-design switchmode transformer? 
13.    Why are skin and proximity effects so important in the selection of magnet wire sizes 
for high-frequency switchmode transformers? 
14.    Why is the transformer DC winding resistance not meaningful in terms of calculating 
the copper losses in a high-frequency transformer? 
15.   Why are half turns a problem in conventional E-core transformer designs? 
16.   What is the advantage of a bifilar winding, and how is it constructed? 
17.   What are the disadvantages of a bifilar winding? 
18.    What is the difference between a transformer RFI screen and a safety screen, and how 
are these constructed? 
19.    Is it possible to fit half turns to a conventional E transformer without causing flux 
imbalance? 
Cut pages from pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages from pdf document
Cut pages from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf document; delete pages of pdf preview
3.91
DERIVATION OF AREA 
PRODUCT 
EQUATIONS FOR 
TRANSFORMER DESIGN
4.A.1. DERIVATION OF TRANSFORMER AREA 
PRODUCT (AP)
The transformer  input  power  P
in
depends on  the  output  power P
out
and efficiency H.
Hence
P
P
in
out

H
(4.A.1)
The average DC input current to the converter transformer I
dc
depends on the input power 
P
in
and the DC input voltage V
in
. Hence
I
P
V
dc
in
in

(4.A.2)
The maximum rms primary current I
pm
occurs when the input voltage is minimum V
in(min)
and the pulse width is maximum. Factor K
t
relates the DC input to the rms primary current 
dependent on the converter topology. K
I I
t
pm

dc
/ . Hence
I
I
K
pm
t

dc
(4.A.3)
Substituting Eq. (4.A.2) for I
dc
at minimum input voltage,
I
P
V
K
pm
t

in
in(min)
(4.A.4)
The usable window area A
p
(available for the primary winding) depends on the total 
window A
w
; the window area reserved for the primary, given by the “primary area factor” 
K
p
; and the primary area “utilization factor” K
u
. Hence
A
AK K
p
w
p
u

(4.A.5)
APPENDIX 4.A
3.91
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Security PDF component download. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages pdf preview
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
NET application. Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF pages in C#.NET console class. Support .NET WinForms
delete page from pdf file online; delete page from pdf file
3.92
PART 3
The number of primary turns N
p
that will just fill the primary window space A
p
at a wire 
current density of J depends on the primary current; hence
N
AJ
I
p
p
pm

(4.A.6)
Substituting Eq. (4.A.5) for A
p
and Eq. (4.A.4) for I
pm
,
N
AK K JV
K
P
p
w
p
u
t

in
in
(min)
(4.A.7)
or
A
N P
K K JV
K
w
p
p
u
t

in
in(min)
From Faraday’s law,
E
Nd
dt

&
(4.A.8)
Hence
V
t
N BA
p
e
in
on
(min)
(max)

$
or
A
V
t
N
B
e
p

in
on
(min)
(max)
$
where t
on
 “on” period
$B  flux density change during “on” period
A
e
 effective core area
The maximum “on” time is one half period at the operating frequency f; hence
t
f
on(max)

1
2
(4.A.9)
Substituting Eq. (4.A.9) into Eq. (4.A.8),
A
V
N
B f
e
p

in(min)
$ 2
(4.A.10)
Now
AP A A
w
e

Combining Eqs. (4.A.7) and (4.A.10),
AP
P
KK K J B f
t u
p

in
4
m
$ 2
(4.A.11)
If the transformer is limited to a 30°C temperature rise under convection-cooled conditions, 
the wire current density J is given by the empirical relation1,2
J
AP

r
r
450 10
4
0125
2
.
A/m
(4.A.12)
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe Free Visual Studio .NET PDF library, easy to be Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete pages on pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
delete pdf page acrobat; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.93
(For a constant temperature rise, the current density  must fall as the transformer size 
increases, because the ratio of volume to surface area falls with increasing size.)
Substituting Eq. (4.A.12) into Eq. (4.A.11) and converting AP to centimeters,
AP
P
KK K
AP
B
f
AP
t u
p

r
r
r
r
r
r
in
cm
10
450 10
2
8
4
0125
4
.
$
((
.
)
1 0125
4
4
10
450
2

r
r
r
r
P
KK K
B
f
t u
p
in
cm
$
Therefore
AP
P
KK K
B
f
t u
p

r
r
r
r
¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
in
cm
10
450
2
4
1143
4
$
.
(4.A.13)
Since
K`
KK K
t u
p
(see Table 3.4.1). Substituting  `K in Eq. (4.A.13) and simplifying 
gives
AP
P
K
Bf

`
¤
¦
¥
³
µ
´
11 1
1143
4
.
.
in
cm
$
(4.A.14)
Hence the size of the transformer, in terms of area product AP, can be found knowing the 
input power P
in
, flux density swing $B, frequency f, and a constant of topology  `K for a 
free air temperature rise of 30°C.
4.A.2. TOPOLOGY FACTORS K`
The topology factor K` depends on the type of converter, the type of secondary winding and 
rectificatioin, insulation and screening requirements, and current waveforms.
K` is made up of three subfactors as follows:
K`
KK K
p
u
t
(4.A.15)
4.A.3. PRIMARY AREA FACTOR K
P
This is the ratio of the winding area provided for the primary to the total window area (A
p
/A
w
). 
Although the window area is normally split equally between primary and secondary, the 
primary area is not always fully used for the main primary winding. For example, in the for-
ward converter, an energy recovery winding is usually bifilar-wound, with the main primary 
taking up part of the winding area. Further, in the center-tapped push-pull topology only half 
the primary is active at any time, reducing the effective primary to 25% of the total window 
area. In the same way, a center-tapped secondary winding has the same 25% utility factor.
4.A.4. WINDOW UTILIZATION FACTOR K
U
This is the ratio of the area of window occupied by copper to the total available window 
area. With round wires and normal insulation, this factor is typically 0.4 (40%). When 
bobbin windings are used, this may be as low as 30%.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete page in pdf file; delete pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
delete pdf pages ipad; delete pages from pdf in preview
3.94
PART 3
4.A.5. CURRENT FACTOR K
T
This is the ratio of the DC input current to the maximum primary current (I
dc
/I
p
). It depends 
on the topology of the converter and the shape of the primary current waveform. For sim-
plicity, rectangular waveforms are assumed; this introduces little error in practice.
The winding form of the primary is defined by the type of converter. However, a choice 
exists for the secondary winding form depending on the rectification circuit. Bridge recti-
fiers require a single winding and biphase rectifiers a center-tapped winding with a lower 
copper utilization factor.
4.A.6. TEMPERATURE RISE
The temperature rise of the transformer under free air convection-cooled conditions depends 
on the total internal losses (core loss plus copper losses) and the effective surface area. 
Figure 3.1.7 is developed from measured results and information published in References
1, 2, and 15. It shows the relationship of surface area to area product for typical switch-
mode ferrite cores. It also predicts the temperature rise above ambient as a function of total 
internal dissipation with area product or surface area as a parameter. The temperature rise 
predictions assume free air cooling and an ambient air temperature of 25°C. The predicted 
temperature rise (in the range 20 to 70°C) may be obtained directly from the nomogram by 
entering with the surface area of the transformer and internal dissipation. If the area product 
is known, an indication of the surface area may be obtained from the same nomogram using 
the “AP line” area product intersect.
Alternatively, for a small temperature rise in the range 20 to 50°C,  the following 
approximate formula developed from Fig. 3.1.7 may be used:
$T
P
A
t
s

n
800
C
(4.A.16)
where $T  temperature rise, °C
P
t
 total internal loss, W
A
s
 surface area of transformer, cm2
The surface area A
s
is related to the area product AP as follows:
A
AP
s
34
051
2
.
cm
(4.A.17)
Substituting for A
s
in Eq. (4.A.16),
$T
P
AP
t

n
23 .5
C
from which the thermal resistance R
t
(normalized for a 30°C temperature rise) will be
R
AP
t

n
23 5
05
.
.
C/W
(4.A.18)
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
delete page from pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print.
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete pages from a pdf online
3.95
SKIN AND PROXIMITY 
EFFECTS IN HIGH-FREQUENCY 
TRANSFORMER WINDINGS
4.B.1. INTRODUCTION
The information presented here provides some explanation and justification for the design 
methods used in Chap. 4. For a more complete background, see References 1, 2, 8, 15, 31, 
58, 59, 60, 65, 66, and 67.
To optimize the efficiency of high-frequency switchmode transformers, suitable wire 
gauges, strip sizes, and winding geometries must be used. Filling up the available window 
area with a gauge of wire that will fit simply will not do if optimum efficiency is to be 
obtained. The simple design rules used for line-frequency transformers are inadequate for 
optimum design of high-frequency transformers.
Figures 3.4B.1, 3.4B.5, and 3.4B.6 show how the effective ac resistance of a winding 
is related to frequency, wire size, and number of layers. Hence, at high frequencies, when 
two or three layers of wire are used in a winding, the F
r
ratio (the ratio of the effective ac 
resistance of the winding to its DC resistance) could quite easily be a factor of 10 or more 
in a poor design. That is, the effective resistance of the winding at the working frequency 
could be 10 times greater than its DC resistance. This would give excessive power loss and 
temperature rise.
The intuitive temptation to use as large a wire as possible often leads to the wrong result 
in a high-frequency application. Using too large a wire results in excessive loss as a result of 
skin and proximity effects. Hence too large a wire gauge, giving many layers and excessive 
buildup, is just as inefficient as having too small a gauge. It will be shown that because of 
skin and proximity effects, an ideal wire size or strip thickness exists, and this must be used 
if optimum efficiency is to be obtained.
A brief examination of skin and proximity effects would perhaps be helpful at this 
stage.
APPENDIX 4.B
3.95
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete blank page in pdf online; delete page pdf file reader
3.96
PART 3
4.B.2. SKIN EFFECT
Figure 3.4B.2 shows how an isolated conductor carrying a current will generate a concen-
tric magnetic field. With alternating currents a magnetomotive force (mmf) exists, generat-
ing eddy currents in the conductor. The direction of these eddy currents is such as to add to 
the current at the surface of the wire and subtract from the current in the center. The effect 
is to encourage the current to flow near the surface of the conductor (the well-known skin 
effect). The majority of the current will flow in an equivalent surface skin thickness or 
penetration depth $, defined by the formula
$
K
f
m
(4.B.1)
Where $  penetration depth, mm
f frequency, Hz
K
m
material constant (K
m
ranges from 75 for copper at 100°C to  65.5 for copper 
at 20°C)
FIG. 3.4B.1 F
r
ratio (ratio of ac/DC resistance as a result of skin 
effect) as a function of the effective conductor thickness, with num-
ber of layers P as a parameter (After Dowell31.)
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.97
Figure 3.4B.3 shows the skin thickness or penetration depth for copper at 20°C and 100°C 
plotted over the frequency range 10 to 300 kHz.
For connections to and from the transformer, individual wire diameters in excess of 
2 or 3 times the skin thickness should be avoided. For high-current applications, multifila-
ment windings are preferred. Go and return wires to the same winding should be tightly 
FIG. 3.4B.2 Showing how “skin effect” is caused. Current is constrained to flow 
in the surface layer of the conductor as a result of concentric magnetic fields in the 
body of the conductor caused by the current flow.
FIG. 3.4B.3 Effective skin thickness as a function of frequency, with temperature as a 
parameter.
3.98
PART 3
coupled and run as parallel or twisted pairs. This is also desirable to reduce external leakage 
inductance.
Remember, the copper losses increase in proportion to the current density squared; 
therefore, a small increase in current density at the surface will have a significant effect on 
the effective ac resistance ratio (F
r
ratio).
4.B.3. PROXIMITY EFFECTS
In a transformer, the simple current distribution resulting from the skin effect will be further 
modified by proximity effects from adjacent conductors.
As shown in Fig. 3.4B.4, when a number of turns are wound to form one or more layers, 
a magnetomotive force (mmf) is developed in line with the plane of the winding. The effect 
of this mmf is to develop eddy currents whose direction is such as to add to the current flow 
toward the primary-to-secondary windings interface and reduce the current on the side of 
the winding away from the interface. As a result of these proximity effects, the useful area 
of a conductor is further reduced.
The proximity effect is most pronounced where the mmf is maximum, that is, at the 
primary-to-secondary interface. Figure 3.4.8a and b shows the distribution of mmf in a 
simple winding configuration and that in a sandwiched construction. In the sandwiched 
from, the maximum mmf is halved, and the center of the middle winding has an mmf of 
zero. As a result, the proximity effects in the center of the winding are also zero. Hence, 
for the determination of F
r
, only half the layers and turns of the center winding need be 
considered.
FIG. 3.4B.4 Showing how “proximity effects” are caused. Current is constrained to flow toward the 
interface of the windings as a result of incident magnetic fields from nearby turns.
4. SWITCHMODE TRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.99
4.B.4. DETERMINATION OF OPTIMUM WIRE 
DIAMETER OR STRIP THICKNESS
Figure 3.4B.1 shows the F
r
ratio (ac resistance/DC resistance) plotted against the equivalent 
conductor height J, with number of layers as a parameter.
In general,
J

h
F
l
$
(4.B.2)
where J  effective conductor height, mm
h thickness of strip (or effective diameter of round wire)
F
l
 copper layer factor
Note: To simplify the mathematical treatment, a round conductor of diameter d is replaced 
by a square one of the same area with an effective thickness h; e.g., 
Area of round wire =
or
( /
Area of squ
P
P
r
d
2
2)
aare wire = h
2
Hence
P
d
h
2
2
2
¤
¦
³
µ

Therefore,
hd
P
4
(4.B.3)
The copper layer factor F
l
is a function of the effective wire diameter, spacing between 
wires, turns, and useful winding width:
F
Nh
b
l
w

where N  turns per layer
b
w
 useful winding width, mm
4.B.5. OPTIMUM STRIP THICKNESS
In the simple case of a full-width copper strip winding, at a fixed frequency, J goes to h/$,
since F
l
 1; also, the number of layers is equal to the number of turns. 
The ideal strip thickness can now be established from Fig. 3.4B.1 as follows:
R
FR
r
ac
dc

Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested