c# pdf reader table : Delete pages from pdf preview Library software class asp.net windows winforms ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi61-part532

3.150
PART 3
As shown in Fig. 3.10.6, the inductor ramp sits on top of a large-amplitude square wave 
(the reflected load current), and the slope is quite shallow, especially when the load is large 
and the input voltage is low. Under these conditions, a small noise spike can cause prema-
ture termination of the conduction period.
Great care must be taken in the design of the pcb layout to reduce the noise level injected 
into the ramp comparator. Differential comparators should be used, and inputs should be 
taken directly to the current sense resistor terminations. A small RC filter will normally be 
required to further eliminate noise and remove the inevitable “spike” on the leading edge 
of the current pulse. (These spikes will be caused by snubber components, diode reverse 
recovery currents, and distributed capacitance. All these effects should be reduced to the 
minimum for good performance.)
Note: If these spikes are to be removed by a low-pass RC filter, the time constant of the 
filter should be as small as possible to prevent loss of control at light loads when the pulse is 
very narrow. The components should be mounted close to the comparator inputs. Very often 
common-mode noise problems are best eliminated by using a small current transformer to 
feed the ramp comparator, in place of the current sensing resistor.
Hence, to obtain the maximum ramp slope for best noise immunity and improved transient 
response, the filter inductor should be as small as is consistent with maintaining the con-
tinuous mode at minimum load current. To obtain lower output ripple voltages, it is better 
to use larger low-ESR output capacitors, rather than large inductance values. 
10.8.2 Transfer Function Irregularities Caused by Current-Mode Control 
in Multiple-Output Applications 
Figure 3.10.5 shows a current-mode-controlled circuit of the buck family with a single 
output. It is clear in this example that the current in the output filter inductor is directly 
controlled by the primary current comparator. 
When multiple outputs are required, it is normal practice with duty ratio control to pro-
vide additional secondary windings on the transformer, with rectifiers and LCoutput filters 
to provide the extra outputs. 
However, when current-mode control is used, the transformer tends to look like a con-
stant-current source driving all the outputs in parallel. This high-impedance drive is not a 
problem at DC or low frequency, where all the output voltages will be defined by the duty 
cycle and transformer turns in the same way as in duty-ratio controlled converters. However, 
at frequencies above the lowest filter resonance, the story is quite different, and stability 
problems can occur. 
Normally only one output is sensed and fed back as part of the voltage control loop. The 
input of the LC filter of this controlled output is driven from the high-impedance primary 
current source. However, the LC filters of the other outputs are also effectively attached 
in parallel to this same driving point (the transformer secondaries). At the series resonant 
frequency of each filter, the driving point is shunted by the low impedance of that particular 
resonant output. Hence the source is no longer a constant-current source at this resonant 
frequency. 
Under this condition, the inductor in the closed-loop voltage-controlled output is no lon-
ger eliminated from the small-signal model of the outer voltage control loop, and additional 
phase shift is introduced, which may lead to instability. This problem is particularly severe 
if the resonant shunt filter is only lightly loaded, making its Q high.
The ideal solution is to couple the filter inductors by winding them on a common core. 
The output filters are now no longer independent and do not have separate resonances. 
Delete pages from pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; delete page from pdf file online
Delete pages from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
10. CURRENT-MODE CONTROL
3.151
This integrated output inductor (more correctly choke, as it has a DC component) also 
dramatically improves the dynamic cross regulation. Hence, integrated output chokes 
are preferred for multiple-output forward converters, particularly when current-mode 
control is used.
10.8.3 The Right-Half-Plane Zero in Current-Mode-Controlled Converters 
In the boost-derived family of continuous-inductor-current-mode regulators (incomplete
energy transfer mode), the DC output current is a function of both the average inductor 
current and the duration of the “off” (secondary conduction) period. (This is due to the 
discontinuous nature of the output current, which flows in the output rectifier diodes only 
when the power switches are “off,” as shown in Fig. 3.10.10.)
FIG. 3.10.10 Primary and secondary current waveforms of a boost converter, showing that the immediate 
effect of increasing the “on” pulse width from D1 to D2 is a reduction in the secondary conduction period, 
and hence the transferred energy (the cause of the right-half-plane zero).
However, for any continuous-mode regulator, the duty ratio, and hence the “off” period, 
is a direct function of V
in
. Hence, if the input voltage changes, the average inductor current 
must also be changed to maintain the output current constant. Therefore, unlike in the buck 
regulator, the open-loop line regulation of boost and flyback continuous-mode regulators 
using current-mode control is very poor, even if slope compensation is applied.
When the input voltage increases, the duty ratio will decrease to maintain a constant out-
put voltage in the longer term. Unfortunately, the inductor current cannot change rapidly, 
and the immediate effect of an increase in input voltage is to reduce the duty ratio, which 
results in an increase in the “off” period and the output diode conduction period. Since the 
inductor current will not have changed very much in this period, the immediate effect is to 
increase (rather than decrease) the output voltage. This dynamic reversal in the required 
effect will continue until the inductor has time to adjust to a lower current.
This reversal in the dynamic response is the cause of the right-half-plane zero and is 
intrinsic to the boost-derived topologies when operating in continuous-inductorcurrent
mode. Unfortunately, current-mode control (even with slope compensation) does not elimi-
nate the right-half-plane zero in the boost and flyback continuous-mode converter topolo-
gies. (See Chap. 9.)
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf; delete page from pdf acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pages from a pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf
3.152
PART 3
10.9 FLUX BALANCING IN PUSH-PULL 
TOPOLOGIES WHEN USING CURRENT-MODE 
CONTROL 
In any transformer-coupled push-pull circuit using voltage control, “staircase saturation” of 
the main switching transformer is a well-known and often severe problem. (See Chap. 6.)
Current-mode control intrinsically solves this unbalanced flux density problem by sensing 
and controlling the peak primary currents in the switching devices. The primary currents are 
made up of the inductor load current, transformed to the primary, plus the transformer magne-
tizing current. Any tendency for the transformer to drift away from a balanced flux condition 
will result in a differential change in the magnetization current; hence, because current-mode 
control will maintain the peak current constant, it eliminates any tendency to staircase to satu-
ration. However, there will be a corresponding change in pulse width in one side compared 
with the other, which will introduce a DC compensation current in the transformer winding. 
Hence, when current-mode control is used with push-pull converters, an unbalanced 
pulse width differential is created to correct any asymmetry in the diodes or switching 
devices. This maintains flux density balance in the transformer, but results in an unbal-
anced ampere-second condition. Hence, there will be an effective DC current in the primary 
winding. This can cause problems if there is a DC blocking capacitor in series with the 
transformer winding, as shown below.
Note:A DC blocking capacitor is often fitted in duty-ratio-controlled push-pull converters 
to prevent transformer saturation. The blocking capacitor is in fact intrinsic to the topology 
of the half bridge. 
10.10 ASYMMETRY CAUSED BY CHARGE 
IMBALANCE IN CURRENT-MODE-CONTROLLED 
HALF-BRIDGE CONVERTERS AND OTHER 
TOPOLOGIES USING DC BLOCKING CAPACITORS
As mentioned above, when current-mode control is applied to any push-pull circuit, the peak 
current will be identical for each side. In order to correct any volt-second asymmetry that 
results from diode or switching device imbalance, a small differential offset in pulse width 
will be created. However, any difference in pulse width now results in a small difference in 
the ampere-seconds, or charge, drawn alternately through the primary switching devices. 
In half-bridge circuits (or any push-pull application in which DC blocking capacitors are 
fitted in series with the transformer winding), the unbalanced charge in each half cycle will 
cause a voltage to build up across any series capacitors. Unfortunately, the direction of the 
voltage buildup is such that it tends to reinforce the original volt-second asymmetry, and a 
ranaway situation quickly develops. The series capacitors will charge toward one of the supply 
voltages, and alternate half cycles will have unequal voltage amplitudes. Hence there must not 
be a DC blocking capacitor in series with the transformer winding if current-mode control is 
to be used. 
10.10.1 DC Restoration Techniques 
In the half-bridge circuit, the capacitors are intrinsic to the topology, and steps must be taken to 
provide a DC path to the primary winding by some other means. A suitable method is shown 
in Fig. 3.10.11a, where a separate winding P1 on the main switching transformer with two 
catching diodes D1 and D2 restores the center point voltage on C1 and C2, compensating for 
any unequal ampere-seconds in the switching devices. The wire gauge in this winding and the 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete pages of pdf preview; delete pdf pages online
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete pages in pdf online; add and remove pages from a pdf
10. CURRENT-MODE CONTROL
3.153
diodes can be quite small, as they carry only small restoration currents. The number of turns 
on the separate winding should be the same as the primary turns. If they are bifilar-wound, they 
have the additional advantage of providing a leakage inductance energy recovery action.
FIG. 3.10.11(a) A DC charge restoration circuit using an ancillary wind-
ing on the main switching transformer. DC restoration is required for 
current-mode-controlled half-bridge converters. (b) A DC charge restora-
tion circuit using a center-tapped winding on the 60-Hz auxiliary trans-
former to restore the C1, C2 center point voltage.
A different method of providing DC restoration of the center point voltage is shown 
in Fig. 3.10.11b. In this circuit a small 60-Hz auxiliary transformer is used to provide the 
auxiliary supply to the control circuits. The dual-voltage primary winding on this auxiliary 
transformer also provides the DC restoration of C1 and C2 when they are connected in 
series for 230-V operation. (DC restoration is provided by the supply when they are linked 
for 115-V voltage doubler operation.)
10.11 SUMMARY
Provided that the correct amount of slope compensation is used, current-mode control is 
superior in many ways to the conventional voltage programmed duty ratio control. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page on pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
add or remove pages from pdf; delete page on pdf document
3.154
PART 3
In all topologies it provides inherent fast-acting pulse-by-pulse current or power limit-
ing, a major contribution to reliable performance. Further, changing the low-impedance 
source of duty ratio control to the high-impedance constant-current source of current-mode 
control with continuous inductor current eliminates the inductor from the small-signal 
model, allowing the outer voltage control loop to be fast and stable. This, together with the 
provision of slope compensation, provides good immunity to input voltage variations and 
good open-loop load transient response. 
It is important to recognize when and what type of compensation is required for each 
type of topology. Table 3.10.1 gives a summary of the noncompensated performance of 
TABLE 3.10.1 Summary of Performance for Current-Mode Control Topologies
Advantages and 
limitations
Topology
Flyback
complete 
energy 
transfer
Continuous-inductor-current modes
Flyback
Boost Half-bridge
Forward full-bridge 
full-wave p—p
Pulse-by-pulse automatic 
current limiting
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Good open-loop line 
regulation
Yes
No
No
Medium
Medium
Poor open-loop load 
regulation
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Slope compensation 
required
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
(1 – D) compensation 
required
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Simplified loop 
compensation
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Poor noise immunity
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Right-half-plane zero
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Voltage offset 
transformer DC 
restoration required
No
No
No
Yes
No, provided DC 
blocking capacitor 
not fitted
Loop irregularities with 
multiple outputs
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Integrated output 
inductor required for 
multiple outputs
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Automatic symmetry 
correction in push-pull 
circuits
Yes
Yes
Current sharing for 
paralleled supplies
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
add and delete pages in pdf online; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pdf pages ipad; delete pdf pages reader
10. CURRENT-MODE CONTROL
3.155
the major topologies. In most cases where a poor performance is indicated, the applica-
tion of the correct compensation will very much improve the performance. For example, 
the poor open-loop load regulation indicated for the forward converter would be greatly 
improved by closing the voltage control loop and using slope compensation. In the case 
of the continuous-mode flyback converter, input voltage feedforward compensation would 
also be required. However, this converter has a right-half-plane zero, which limits the tran-
sient performance, as the loop gain must roll off at a low frequency, irrespective of the type 
of control mode used.
The design of multiple-output supplies using current-mode control is complicated by 
the need for integrated output inductors to eliminate loop irregularities (see Sec. 10.8.2). 
However, the design time is well justified, as there is a bonus in improved cross regulation. 
Acknowledgment
Some parts of this section are adapted from “Current-Mode Control of Switching Power 
Supplies” by Lloyd H. Dixon Jr. Reprinted with the permission of the author and Unitrode 
Corporation.
10.12 PROBLEMS
1. What are the basic elements of a current-mode control system? 
2. How is current-mode control used to control the output voltage? 
3. Give three major advantages of current-mode control. 
4. What is the purpose of slope compensation in current-mode control? 
5. What percentage of slope compensation will guarantee stability under any condi-
tions?
6. Why is current-mode control more suitable for parallel operation? 
7. Why is a DC current path required in the primary circuit of a current-modecontrolled
half-bridge converter? 
8. Why is current-mode control not recommended for multiple-output applications when 
separate output filter inductors are used? 
9. Describe a method of eliminating loop gain irregularities in a multiple-output current-
mode-controlled supply. 
10. Does current-mode control eliminate the right-half-plane zero problem? 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages from a pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages of pdf reader
This page intentionally left blank 
3.157
OPTOCOUPLERS 
11.1 INTRODUCTION
In switchmode power supplies, optocouplers—or, more precisely, “opto-electronic cou-
pling and isolating elements”—are often used to convey information from the secondary 
output circuits back to the input primary control circuits without compromising the gal-
vanic isolation between the two.
However, optocouplers have a number of parameter variations and limitations, which 
must be considered at the design stage if problems are to be avoided. Of particular interest 
are variations in transfer ratio with device type and operating temperature, stability prob-
lems caused by the nonlinear current transfer ratio, and the considerable variations among 
devices of the same family. Further, a particular optocoupler may change its parameters 
considerably throughout its working life (aging). Finally, the interelectrode capacitance, 
although small, can cause noise problems because of the high gain in the optotransistor.
As a result of these limitations, the optical coupler should not be used in an open-loop 
mode, where such changes would have a direct effect on the performance. (It was probably 
the use of these devices in an open-loop mode that gave optocouplers a bad name in early 
applications.) Optocouplers are now more often used inside a closed control loop with con-
siderable negative feedback; hence the variations in device parameters will not significantly 
alter the closed-loop transfer function of the loop. 
In many direct-off-line switchmode power supplies, a control loop with negative feed-
back from the DC output back to the primary pulse-width modulator is provided to maintain 
the output voltage constant. It is usually necessary to close the control loop to the output, 
while at the same time providing galvanic isolation between the primary and secondary 
circuits to meet safety and application needs.
Optocouplers very conveniently provide this isolated information link, although only a 
few types meet all the safety agency requirements. 
To ensure that full control will be maintained for all conditions, it is essential that the 
drive circuitry to the optocoupler diode have sufficient drive current margin to take up the 
many variations that will occur between different devices and the reduction in transfer ratio 
that can occur with age.
11.2 OPTOCOUPLER INTERFACE CIRCUIT 
Figure 3.11.1 shows a typical optical coupler drive circuit. In this example a 5-V secondary 
output, on the right-hand side, is to be controlled by a pulse-width modulator in the primary 
circuit (on the left).
CHAPTER 11
3.157
3.158
PART 3
The amplifier A1 compares the reference voltage on ZD1 (node A) with the output
voltage via the divider network R7, R8. The conduction state of Q2 is thus controlled to 
define the current in the optodiode D1, and via optical coupling the collector current in 
optotransistor Q1. Q1 then defines the pulse width and output voltage, compensating for 
any tendency in the output voltage to change.
To prevent any loss of control as the optocoupler ages and gain (transfer ratio) falls, it 
is essential to provide an adequate drive current margin in Q2. 
Consider the Motorola MOC1006 optocoupler/isolator. (The typical transfer character-
istics are shown in Fig. 3.11.2.) This device has a specified minimum current transfer ratio 
of 10%, and a maximum diode current rating of 80 mA continuous. 
FIG. 3.11.1 Optically coupled voltage control loop, using a voltage comparator amplifier A1 and 
voltage reference on the secondary, optically coupled to the primary pulse-width modulator A2.
FIG. 3.11.2 Typical current transfer function of an optical coupler 
(collector current, as a function of diode current, in common-emitter 
mode), showing how the transfer ratio is temperature-dependent.
11. OPTOCOUPLERS
3.159
The LM 358 amplifier A1 is rated for a maximum output current of only 10 mA. 
Consequently, to get the maximum range of control for the optocoupler (0 to 80 mA), a 
buffer transistor Q2 is connected to the output of A1. A limiting resistor R4 ensures that 
the maximum current rating of OC1 cannot be exceeded during current limit or transient 
conditions.
To eliminate the effects of variations and nonlinearity in the forward voltage drop of the 
optodiode D1, negative feedback to amplifier A1 is taken across resistor R5.
In this example, the chosen operating current for the optodiode is 5 mA. The large cur-
rent accommodation range provided by Q2 should be adequate to take up any variations 
in devices or reduction in transfer ratio resulting from aging of the optocoupler. Even so, 
optocouplers with well-defined transfer ratios should be used, as unspecified devices can 
have extremely wide tolerances. Large changes in the open-loop gain make it difficult to 
define the transfer function of the overall control loop. 
The total system control loop is closed by the remaining power and control circuitry. 
Consequently, the optocoupler is inside the feedback loop, and the effect of variations in 
the transfer ratio is reduced by the negative feedback such that the closed-loop gain remains 
nearly constant.
Note: The voltage gain for a series voltage negative feedback amplifier is
`
A
A
A
(1 B
B
)
Where A  loop gain without feedback
A'  gain with feedback 
           B  feedback factor 
A' tends to 
1
B
when A q A'.
Hence, large variations in the optocoupler tolerances and aging will not cause signifi-
cant degradation of the overall performance provided that the open-loop gain is large and 
the optocoupler changes are within the range of the control circuit. 
Figure 3.11.3 shows an alternative optocoupler drive circuit using the TL 431 shunt 
regulator IC. This regulator contains the reference voltage and can deliver up to 100 mA 
of drive into the optodiode D1, eliminating the need for the buffer transistor. In this 
FIG. 3.11.3 An example of an optically coupled pulse-width modulator, using the TL 431 shunt 
regulator IC, as the control element.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested