c# pdf reader table : Delete blank pages in pdf files Library SDK class asp.net .net windows ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi67-part538

3.210
PART 3
16.9 CONVECTION, RADIATION, 
OR CONDUCTION? 
Of the three heat exchanger mechanisms, convection and conduction are of major inter-
est to the power supply designer. Radiation within the supply is generally a nuisance, as 
heat radiated away by one component is generally absorbed by adjacent components. Very 
often the power supply will be mounted inside the user’s enclosure, together with the dis-
sipating loads, where it will receive as much (or even more) radiant energy as it gives off. 
Consequently, the radiation properties of the power supply are often of little value. 
16.9.1 Convection Cooling 
If a free air flow is available, then convection, or forced air (fan), cooling is by far the most 
cost-effective way of removing unwanted heat. Figure 3.16.6 shows the dramatic improve-
ment that will be obtained when forced air cooling is used. Heat exchangers with good 
forced air cooling properties will be chosen, and these usually have a large effective surface 
area as a result of having many cooling fins.
FIG. 3.16.6 Thermal resistance as a function of air velocity for various 
heat exchanger sizes.
Convection cooling becomes less effective at high altitude because of the reduction in 
the air density. Figure 3.16.7 shows this altitude effect. It should be noted that there is a 
20% reduction in cooling efficiency at 10,000 ft. 
Further, in nonforced convection cooling, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger 
is not linearly proportional to the size. (Larger surfaces will not be as effectively cooled, as 
the air will be heated as it passes over the surface of the exchanger.) Figure 3.16.8 shows 
how the thermal resistance of a vertical finned extrusion varies with the length. Very little 
improvement is obtained beyond a length of 12 in.
Delete blank pages in pdf files - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf file online; delete pages pdf document
Delete blank pages in pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages on pdf file; cut pages from pdf reader
16. THERMAL MANAGEMENT
3.211
16.9.2 Conduction Cooling 
Where little air flow is available, conduction cooling is a viable alternative. For conduc-
tion cooling, the finned heat sinks will be replaced by thermal shunts (bridges) between 
the heat generating components and the chassis. The thermal conduction properties of the 
material chosen for the heat shunts will be important. (See Table 3.16.1.) The chassis, in 
turn, must have a good thermal contact to some external heat exchanger—for example, the 
case of the equipment. 
For conduction cooling, it should be remembered that aluminum is only half as good a 
thermal conductor as copper, and steel is only 25% as good as aluminum. 
FIG. 3.16.7Free air cooling efficiency as a function of altitude. 
FIG. 3.16.8 Ratio of the thermal resistance of a 3-in length of finned heat sink extru-
sion to the resistance of longer lengths as a function of heat sink length, with the device 
mounted in the center. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page from pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create PDF from Open Office files. Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc
delete pages on pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
3.212
PART 3
Tables 3.16.1, 3.16.2, and 3.16.3 give the thermal properties of commonly used heat 
exchanger and insulating materials. The typical thermal resistance of T0-3 and T0-220 
packages using standard mounting insulators and procedures is also shown. 
16.9.3 Radiation Cooling 
As previously explained, radiation is not usually a very effective method of cooling in 
switchmode supplies. Radiant heat is an electromagnetic wave phenomenon, and as such 
travels in straight lines, and good “line of sight” free radiant paths are not often provided in 
switchmode applications. Radiant energy from hot spots falling on the case or other com-
ponents either gets reflected back or simply raises the temperature of the other components 
and the environment. However, when a good radiant path can be established, this mode of 
cooling should be considered. 
For a perfect blackbody radiator, the Stefan-Boltzmann law states that the rate of 
energy radiated is proportional to the fourth power of the absolute temperature differ-
ential (in Kelvins) between the hot and cold bodies. The cold body in this case is the 
environment. 
Hence, where a good radiant path can be established, radiation can provide a con-
siderable proportion of the total heat loss, particularly for high-temperature components 
where the air flow is restricted. Under these conditions, the radiation properties (emis-
sivity) of the heat exchanger surface become important. 
From the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, the watt loss per square inch of radiating surface 
Q is 
Q
eT

r
36 77 10
12
4
.
where Q  watt loss per square inch
e emissivity of surface
T temperature difference, K 
The emissivity of a surface is the ratio of the surface’s radiation properties to those of a 
true blackbody radiator. Table 3.16.4 shows the emissivity of some commonly used heat 
exchanger materials. It should be noted that the emissivity is dependent on the finish 
as well as on the type of material. Glossy surfaces will not be as good as matt surfaces. 
Further, since the radiation is in the infrared range, the color in the visual range is 
TABLE 3.16.4 Typical Emissivity of Common Metals as a Function 
of Surface Finish and Color 
Material
Surface finish and color
Typical 
emissivity e
True blackbody
True black
1.0
Aluminum
Polished
0.04
Aluminum
Painted (any color)
0.9
Aluminum
Rough
0.06
Aluminum
Matt anodized (any color)
0.8
Copper
Rolled bright
0.03
Steel
Plain
0.5
Steel
Painted (any color)
0.8
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
delete page pdf file; delete page on pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
delete a page from a pdf online; delete a page from a pdf reader
16. THERMAL MANAGEMENT
3.213
not important. For example, matt anodized aluminum has the same 0.8 emissivity value 
in any color.
If oil paints are to be used, the thickness, finish, and thermal properties of the paint 
should be considered. It may not always be possible to realize the full potential of the emis-
sivity figures if the paint is thick or glossy. 
Figure 3.16.9 shows the heat loss due to radiation alone from both sides of a 1in-square
plate in a free radiation environment of 293 K (20°C) compared with a true blackbody 
radiator. Notice that there is a considerable difference between the bright glossy aluminum 
and the matt painted surface. 
Poor radiators are also good reflectors, and this can be used to advantage in protecting 
heat-sensitive components from nearby hot components. For example, polished aluminum 
foil can be placed between a hot resistor and an electrolytic capacitor to reduce the radiant 
heating of the capacitor. Since the reverse is also true, good radiant heat dissipators are 
good heat absorbers, and power supplies designed for radiant cooling should be kept out 
of direct sunlight. 
16.10 HEAT EXCHANGER EFFICIENCY 
The heat exchanger designs available to the power supply designer are legion. Manufacturers 
claim various advantages for their designs, and there is a tendency to assume that a heavy 
sink with many fins or fingers must be more efficient. 
When free air convected cooling is to be used, the difference between heat exchang-
ers that occupy the same effective overall volume is in fact quite small, probably less 
than 10% in most cases. The reason for this is that the radiation from one fin or finger is 
FIG. 3.16.9 Thermal radiation properties as a function of heat sink temperature 
differential, with surface finish as a parameter. 
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page NET, how to reorganize Word document pages and how
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pages pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page to reorganize PowerPoint document pages and how
delete pages of pdf reader; delete pages from pdf preview
3.214
PART 3
picked up by the facing fin or finger, so that the effective radiation surface is given by the 
surface of the silhouette. Hence, the surface of a box of a volume that will just contain 
the heat sink will have similar heat exchanger and radiation properties in free air. For 
natural convection cooling, the air flow over the fins is such that the increased surface 
area is not very effectively utilized. 
Figure 3.16.10 shows a log/log graph of the thermal resistance of various commercial 
heat exchangers plotted against the effective volume (developed from the published val-
ues) for a temperature rise of 50°C. Very few of the conventional heat exchanger designs
deviate far from this result for natural convection cooling. (Some of the more expensive 
“pin fin” exchangers claim up to 30% improvement.) However, when forced-air cooling 
is used, the effect of the fins or fingers can be dramatic. Graph D in Fig. 3.16.6 Shows the 
improvement that can be obtained when a finned heat exchanger is used in a forced-air 
condition—the thermal resistance falls from more than 6°C/W to less than 1.5°C/W with 
an air flow of 1000 ft/min.
FIG. 3.16.10 Thermal resistance of finned heat exchangers as a function of enclosed heat exchanger 
volume, with air flow as a parameter.
16.11 THE EFFECT OF INPUT POWER 
ON THERMAL RESISTANCE 
The effective thermal resistance from a heat exchanger to the ambient air is not constant, 
but will fall as the input power and hence the thermal differential increases. This is due to 
both the increase in radiated heat as the temperature rises (Stefan-Boltzmann law) and the 
increase in convection turbulence at the higher temperatures. The quoted thermal resistance 
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete page in pdf preview
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
cut pages from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf reader
16. THERMAL MANAGEMENT
3.215
should be adjusted in accordance with the graph shown in Fig. 3.16.11 to get the effective 
thermal resistance at the working temperature. 
FIG. 3.16.11 Thermal resistance correction factor as a function of heat exchanger temperature differ-
ential (heat exchanger to free air).
16.12 THERMAL RESISTANCE AND HEAT 
EXCHANGER AREA 
The thermal resistance does not fall in direct proportion to the surface area, as one might 
expect. This  is due to the need to conduct the heat to the remote regions of the heat 
exchanger, which gives a temperature differential. Also, the air will be progressively heated 
as it passes over the surface of the heat exchanger. The graph shown in Fig. 3.16.12 gives a 
general indication for flat square metal plates with the heat input in the center and various 
surface finishes. As might be expected, the thermal resistance also changes with the attitude 
of the plate, and for this reason a finned extrusion should be used in the vertical plane for 
maximum efficiency in free air convected cooling conditions. However, the difference in 
thermal resistance between horizontal and vertical fins is approximately 10%, not as large 
a difference as might be expected.
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pages pdf
3.216
PART 3
16.13 FORCED-AIR COOLING 
In forced-air cooling, a fan or duct forces the air to flow through the supply enclosure at a 
much increased rate. There are many advantages to this method of cooling. Apart from the 
obvious improvement provided by the more rapid exchange of air, the flow direction can be 
used to advantage by placing the hot components in the exhaust port so that heat is carried 
away from the rest of the unit. Further, the air flow can be directed to prevent any static air 
buildup, an effect that is difficult to avoid in a free-flow convection-cooled supply. 
Power supplies with outputs of 500 W or more will normally have some form of 
forced-air cooling. 
The amount of air required for cooling depends on the air density, the power to be dis-
sipated, and the permitted temperature rise. At sea level the following equation applies: 
Air flow (cfm)
loss

$
1. 76Q
T
where cfm  cubic feet per minute
Q
loss
 internal loss, W
$T  permitted internal temperature rise, °C 
The fan must overcome the back pressure that results from the restriction to the flow 
within the supply enclosure. The back pressure depends  on  the  size and  packing 
density and will normally be of the order of 0.1 to 0.3 in of water per 100 cfm. This 
parameter is best  measured in the finished unit, and a fan  is selected to  give the 
FIG. 3.16.12 Thermal resistance as a function of surface area (both sides of a 
1
8
-in-thick flat 
metal plate), with a dissipation of 20 W, in convection-cooled conditions, with surface finish and 
mounting plane (vertical or horizontal) as parameters. 
16. THERMAL MANAGEMENT
3.217
required air  flow  at the measured back pressure. Most fan  manufacturers provide 
pressure/flow information. 
In the final analysis, the mechanical and thermal design of the supply and enclosure
must be capable of removing the waste heat from both the supply and any loads within 
the enclosure, under all operating conditions. The user must also consider the thermal 
requirements; otherwise the efforts of the power supply designer will be to no avail. When 
in doubt, the user must measure the temperatures of critical components once thermal 
equilibrium has been established in the working environment. Effective methods of cooling 
must be used if long-term reliability is to be achieved. 
16.14 PROBLEMS 
1. Why is thermal management so important in switchmode power supply design? 
2. How is the MTBF related to operating and component temperatures? 
3. When using an electrical model for thermal design, what would be the electrical ana-
logue of a heat-generating transistor junction? 
4. What is the electrical analogue of thermal resistance? 
5. What is the electrical analogue of specific heat? 
6. What is the electrical analogue of temperature differential? 
7. What is the essential difference between convection cooling and radiation cooling? 
8. Why is the common practice of using thermal compound on small printed circuit board 
mounted heat sinks generally of little value? 
9. Is the thermal resistance a fixed parameter? 
10. Is the thermal resistance of a heat exchanger directly proportional to its size? 
11. Does the color of the heat exchanger affect its thermal properties? 
12. In free air conditions, does the orientation of a finned heat exchanger have much bear-
ing on its performance? 
13. What is the effect of increasing altitude on heat exchanger performance? 
14. Under convected-cooling conditions, is a heat exchanger with many closely spaced fins 
better than a heat exchanger of equivalent size with fewer fins? 
15. Why is a small amount of forced air cooling so valuable for improving the life of 
switchmode power supplies?
This page intentionally left blank 
P
L
A
L
R
L
T
L
4
SUPPLEMENTARY
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested