c# pdf reader table : Delete pages from pdf in preview Library SDK class asp.net .net winforms ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi68-part539

This page intentionally left blank 
Delete pages from pdf in preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from a pdf file
Delete pages from pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf online; delete page from pdf acrobat
4.33
ACTIVE POWER FACTOR 
CORRECTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION
The electrical utility companies produce electric power from various prime energy sources, 
typically coal, oil, gas, hydro, and nuclear power. Clearly, it is in everyone’s interest that 
the conversion efficiency be as high as possible, to minimize thermal and other pollution 
problems.
Generating and distributing equipment includes rotating machinery, 60/50-Hz trans-
formers, and power distribution lines, all of which are more efficient when the loads are 
purely resistive, taking sine wave currents in phase with the applied voltage and free of 
harmonics.
Reactive/resistive load combinations, although taking a sinusoidal current, introduce a 
phase shift between voltage and current, which reduces the efficiency of the distributing 
equipment. One has only to consider a purely capacitive load; this will take current from 
the line, which will cause copper loss in the distributing equipment, but produces no useful 
power at the load. A pure inductor would do the same thing. Inductive loads are common; 
a typical example would be the older type of magnetic ballast, where an inductor is used to 
control the current in a fluorescent lighting application.
Fortunately, the phase error caused by reactive loading can be corrected quite simply, 
using passive power factor correction. (In the case of an inductive load, a shunt capacitor 
of suitable value will correct the phase error and the combination will simulate a purely 
resistive load.)
More insidious problems are caused by nonlinear loads, which distort the current wave-
form and introduce harmonic currents in the supply and distribution system.
The harmonics (distortion) caused by nonlinear loads cannot be eliminated by the tradi-
tional passive power factor correction methods. If the harmonic currents are allowed to flow 
in the supply system, they will cause additional transformer and distribution loss, and the 
harmonic components result in a compensating current flow in the neutral line of a three-
phase, four-wire distribution system. This latter effect is often the most problematical, as 
the neutral line is not designed to carry such currents.
Clearly, it is incumbent on the responsible engineer to minimize power line pollution. 
Moreover, many countries have long been proposing to enforce regulations to limit such 
pollution; typical requirements are defined under the IEC-555–2 harmonic limits, or more 
recently IEC 1000–3–2, which in 1998 was the generally accepted standard. Legislation to 
enforce such standards has been delayed many times, perhaps as a result of the reluctance 
or inability of industry to meet the correction needs.
CHAPTER 1
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages of pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pages from a pdf document; delete pdf page acrobat
4.4
PART 4
Although passive low-pass filters in the power line can be used to reduce the harmonic 
content to acceptable limits, a more viable solution at high power levels can be found, using 
one of the various so-called active power factor correction methods.
Sections 1.2 and 1.3 of this chapter provide some background based on well-known 
passive power correction methods; this material will be of more value to those readers who 
are not very familiar with the general principles. Section 1.4 describes the principles of 
active power factor correction, and Sec. 1.10 gives an applied design example, as applied 
to a 2.2-kW switching power supply for use in industrial lighting applications.
1.2 POWER FACTOR CORRECTION BASICS, 
MYTHS, AND FACTS
1.2.1 Power Factor Basic Definition
Power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio of the true power dissipated in the load to the appar-
ent power taken by the load, irrespective of the waveform, as shown in Eq. (4.1.1):
PF
true power
apparent power

(4.1.1)
The true power is the time-averaged power, which results in heating or mechanical work 
being done, the rate of work being measured in true watts.
Apparent power is the time-averaged product of the rms voltage and rms current, mea-
sured at the input to the load, without adjustment for phase shift or distortion. It is known 
as the input voltamperes (VA), and the rate of apparent work has units of apparent watts, 
as shown in Eq. (4.1.2):
Apparentpower(VA)
rms
rms

V r
I
(4.1.2)
In the special case of a purely resistive load, the voltage and current both are sinusoidal 
and in phase, and the true power is equal to the apparent power, giving the ideal power fac-
tor ratio of unity. Although power factor ratios correctly range from 0:1 to 1:1, it is quite 
common to quote a percentage, where 100% is equal to a ratio of 1:1.
1.2.2 Power Factor in Sine Wave Applications
In the simple case of nondistorting reactive plus resistive load combinations, the cur-
rent and voltage both remain sinusoidal, but a phase shift is introduced by the reactive 
component (with the current lagging the voltage for inductive loads and leading it for 
capacitive loads).
Typical nondistorting reactive loads are shown in Fig. 4.1.1. Figure 4.1.1a shows 
a series inductive and resistive load combination, with a shunt capacitor Cl to provide 
power factor correction. Figure 4.1.1b shows a shunt capacitive and resistive load combi-
nation, with a series inductor L2 to provide power factor correction. Other series or shunt 
configurations are possible, depending on the application.
Figure 4.1.2 shows the voltage and current waveforms for a typical capacitive load. 
The current leads the applied voltage by an amount depending on the ratio of resistance to 
inductance, giving a leading phase angle of between 0 and 90°.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
cut pages from pdf; delete page from pdf online
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete page on pdf file
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.5
FIG. 4.1.1 (a)Passive power factor correction for a linear inductive plus resistive 
load, using a power factor correction shunt capacitor. (b) Passive power factor 
correction for a capacitive plus resistive load, using a series power factor correc-
tion inductor.
FIG. 4.1.2 Sine wave voltage and current at the input of a capaci-
tive plus resistive load, showing the current leading the voltage.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
best pdf editor delete pages; delete page pdf file reader
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf
4.6
PART 4
Figure 4.1.3 shows a vector diagram of the real and apparent power developed in an 
inductive load. It demonstrates how the real power is less than the apparent power if there 
is a reactive component.
By inspection of Fig. 4.1.3, it is clear that the ratio of the true power to the apparent power 
is given by cos Ø, where Ø is the phase angle between the voltage and the current. This gives 
rise to the well-known power equation for true sine waves shown in Eq. (4.1.3):
Truepower
cos
rms
rms

r
r
V
I
Ø
(4.1.3)
1.2.3 Distortion Effects
When the current (or voltage) is not a true sine wave, it is said to be distorted. Fourier 
analysis will show the waveform to be made up of a number of harmonically related sine 
waves of differing amplitudes and phases. In the case of symmetrical distortion, only the 
odd harmonics will be found.
It was shown above that the power factor with true sine waves can be equal to or less 
than unity, depending on the phase angle; however, when distortion is present, the power 
factor will always be less than unity.
Unfortunately, any load that has rectifiers and capacitors in the power path (this includes 
linear and switching power converters) will tend to draw current from the supply in a dis-
torted form; typically, the current will flow in a narrow conduction angle near the peaks of 
the supply voltage. Figure 4.1.4a shows the typical input circuit for a switchmode power 
supply for direct-off-line operation. In the case of a linear supply, Fig. 4.1.4b, the rectifier 
will be positioned in the secondary of a 60-Hz line transformer, but the effect will be the 
same. Figure 4.1.5 shows a typical line-current waveform developed by the rectifier and 
capacitor load combination. The discontinuous, symmetrical “peaky” current waveform is 
very rich in odd harmonic components.
1.2.4 Myth (a Common Error)
Upon inspection of Fig. 4.1.5, the rectifier current waveform appears to be generally sinu-
soidal and in phase with the voltage. This leads to a rather common error. There is a ten-
dency to assume that with this type of waveform the true power will be given by the simple 
VA product, V
rms
rI
rms
. However, this is far from being true.
As mentioned above, distortion introduces harmonics, and in this example the power 
factor is likely to be in the range 0.5 to 0.8 (a potential 50% error on the calculated VA 
FIG. 4.1.3 Vector diagram showing how the apparent power 
will exceed the real power in a resistive plus reactive load.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete a page from a pdf file; delete a page in a pdf file
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf file
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.7
FIG. 4.1.4 (a) A typical rectifier capacitor input stage for a direct-off-line switchmode 
power supply. (b) A typical 60-Hz transformer rectifier capacitor input stage for an iso-
lated linear power supply.
FIG. 4.1.5 Typical rectifier output voltage and current waveforms when a large capacitive 
load is applied to the input rectifier, showing large peak currents and discontinuous conduc-
tion, rich in odd harmonics.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages pdf file; add and delete pages in pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete page from pdf reader
4.8
PART 4
value). The discontinuous-current waveform, although it may appear sinusoidal, is rich in 
odd harmonics, and power transfer takes place only at the fundamental frequency. However, 
the rms current measurement includes the harmonics. For such waveforms, a true wattmeter 
instrument is essential to measure true input power. In calculating power, the phase and 
amplitude of all harmonics must be included.
1.2.5 True Power Measurement
True wattmeter instruments are used to measure the true power of phase-shifted and/ 
or distorted waveforms. The older type, analog moving-coil instruments (dynamometer 
wattmeters) rely on the magnetic interaction flux & between two air-cored coils, one 
that is fixed and carries the load current I
L
(current coil) and a second (voltage coil) that 
is free to rotate against a return spring. The second coil carries a much smaller current 
proportional to the applied voltage. This current is supplied via a limiting resistor from 
the voltage supply terminals I
v
.
The dynamics of such an arrangement are very simple but effective. The instantaneous 
magnetic moment applied between the coils is proportional to the instantaneous product 
of the in-phase components of I
L
and I
v
. This moment is time-averaged by the inertia of 
the relatively heavy moving parts, and the mean moment works against the return spring 
on the moving coil to provide a deflection (and hence a reading) proportional to the mean 
moment. This arrangement satisfies the basic requirements for power measurement, as 
shown in Eqs. (4.1.4) and (4.1.5).
Deflection
r
¯
1
T
It
Vt dt
&
&
()
()
(4.1.4)
By inspection, this has the same form as the electrical equation for power for a single-phase 
system:
True power 
¯
1
T
V t I t dt
() ( )
(4.1.5)
The old dynamometer-type moving-coil instruments are becoming rather rare, as they 
are being replaced by the more modern, lower-cost electronic instruments. However, the 
author has found that for development applications (where power measurements are often 
made at the breadboard stage before input RFI filters have been fitted), some digital instru-
ments may be upset by the large RF noise levels found in switching applications and can 
give large errors. Hence it is prudent to at least compare the test results with a dynamom-
eter-type instrument, which just cannot respond to the high-frequency noise. Therefore, if 
you can find a good dynamometer instrument, cherish it!
Unless it is known for sure that the applied voltage is a pure sine wave and the load 
is purely resistive, true power measurements require the use of a wattmeter, or one of the 
digital power analyzers, that will correctly compensate for the distortion and/or phase 
shift effects.
1.2.6 Power Factor (Fact!)
With distorted waveforms, it is possible to satisfy the power factor requirements with vari-
ous power factor correction methods, without meeting the harmonic limitations given in 
IEC-555–2 or IEC 1000–3–2.
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.9
This is possible because the IEC specifications limit the amplitude of each harmonic, 
and it is possible to have one or more harmonics out of limit and still meet the overall power 
factor requirement.
Hence, it is necessary to measure both power factor and harmonic distribution and 
amplitude to be sure of meeting all IEC requirements. Remember, the voltage waveform 
is used as a reference for the current waveform in most power factor correction (PFC)
systems, and hence any distortion of the applied voltage should be considered in the mea-
surement process.
1.2.7 Efficiency (Myth!)
It is often claimed  that power factor correction improves efficiency. This  is true, of 
course, for the power distribution system. In general however, this is not true for a 
power-factor-corrected power supply. In most topologies, the correction circuit dissipates 
additional power and does little to improve the efficiency of the following switching 
power circuits.
Very often, two power conversions are carried out in the active PFC system, and hence 
the total power loss normally exceeds that of a noncorrected system with only a single 
power conversion stage.
Therefore, the efficiency of a corrected unit is generally lower than that of a noncor-
rected unit, and for the same output power and size, the working temperature of the PFC 
unit will often be higher.
1.2.8 Line Utilization (Fact!)
In general, it is possible to obtain more real power from a limited source (say, a standard 
wall outlet) when using a power factor corrected unit. This is possible because the rms 
input current of a corrected unit remains less than that of a noncorrected unit of the same 
output power, in spite of the lower overall efficiency of the corrected unit.
For example, the standard 120-V, 15-A wall socket is limited by UL ratings to run con-
tinuously at 12 A. With a typical noncorrected rectified power unit, the power factor will 
be of the order of 0.65 and the efficiency, say, 80%. At 12 A, this will provide a maximum 
output power of 750 W.
With a power factor corrected unit, the power factor can exceed 98%, although the effi-
ciency will generally be lower, say, 73%. Hence, at 12 A, the output power will now be of 
the order of 1000 W for the corrected unit (250 W more than for the noncorrected unit).
I believe this effect is the cause of the confusion over efficiency. It is important to notice 
that the power dissipated within the noncorrected unit at 750 W output at 80% efficiency 
will be 187 W, while the corrected unit at 73% efficiency and the same 750-W power out-
put will dissipate 275 W, an extra 88 W. At 1000 W output, the loss in the corrected unit 
will be as high as 370 W. Hence improved cooling may be required in the PFC unit.
1.3 PASSIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
Passive power  factor  correction involves the use of linear inductors and capacitors to 
improve the power factor and minimize harmonic components. This method works very 
well with simple nondistorted reactive loads, where the undesirable reactive component 
(or phase shift) can be taken out with the addition of simple equal but opposite reactive 
components.
4.10
PART 4
However, the harmonics (or distortion) produced by nonlinear loads do not respond 
very well to this approach. To eliminate the higher-frequency harmonics in distorted wave-
forms requires a low-pass power filter in series with the power line.
At higher power levels, large amounts of power must be stored and manipulated by 
this filter, and hence it requires large inductors and capacitors, which are not very cost-
effective. However, at low power levels, such filters are used to good effect in passive 
power factor correction systems.
Typical applications include ballasts for fluorescent lamps, where the large input fil-
ter inductor is sometimes integrated into the lamp transformer design. Power factors 
exceeding 0.9 (90%) can be obtained with such methods, but they are normally limited 
to power levels of 100 W or less. Figure 4.1.6 shows a typical filter used at the input of 
a 70-W fluorescent ballast. It will be noticed that the design is a compromise. Practical 
limitations of size and cost normally limit the inductor L1 to about 250 mH and C1 to 
between 2 and 4 MF, giving a cutoff frequency of about 200 Hz. C2 is added to form a 
notch filter for higher-frequency harmonics. Although this is not ideal, the improvement 
can be dramatic, moving the power factor from less than 0.6 to above 0.9. The harmonic 
content can remain quite large, but for low-power applications the agency limitations on 
harmonic content are more tolerant.
FIG. 4.1.6 Passive LCR input filter for harmonic reduction, typically used in 
passive power factor corrected magnetic ballasts.
A side effect to bear in mind when using this type of passive power factor correction 
circuit is that L1 and C1 tend to form a series resonant circuit, which together with the 
wider conduction angle of the rectifier results in a higher DC output voltage from the bridge 
rectifier.
Further, because of this resonant effect, it has been found that the voltage across L1 can 
exceed the supply voltage by up to 25%, and this should be considered when designing L1. 
Equation (4.1.6) may be used to calculate the minimum number of turns required on L1, 
which would normally be a laminated iron core with an air gap, to make the inductance 
more linear.
N
V
fBA
e
e
min
.

10
444
6
(4.1.6)
Where for laminated iron cores V
e
 V
in
 25%V
in
, Vrms
f line frequency, Hz (typically 50 or 60 Hz)
B maximum flux density, T (typically 1.3 T)
A
e
 effective core area, mm2 (typically 0.6 r pole area)
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.11
1.3.1 “Valley-Fill” Power Factor Correction Methods
The so-called valley-fill method relies on the use of extra diodes and capacitors to change 
the effective circuit at various stages of the charge and discharge cycle of the storage 
capacitors so as to improve the power factor. It is not truly passive (there is no L/C filter), 
and is active only inasmuch as there is a switching action of the diodes at various parts 
of the cycle.
The method was described by Spangler86 in 1988, and more recently, computer model-
ing of a voltage-doubled version of the Spangler circuit by Kit Sum85 indicates that power 
factors of 98% should be possible.
It has potential as a low-cost method in lower-power applications such as fluorescent 
lamps, where the original Spangler methods have been used for some years. It is a good, 
practical, low-cost, efficient method that should not be neglected.
Figure 4.1.7 shows the original Spangler circuit, and Fig. 4.1.8 shows the computer-
modeled current waveform expected at the input to this circuit. Figure 4.1.9 shows the new 
FIG. 4.1.7 “Valley-fill” power factor correction circuit used in low-
power applications. (Spangler.86)
FIG. 4.1.8 Typical current waveform at the input to the Spangler circuit.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested