c# pdf reader table : Copy pages from pdf to new pdf SDK control API wpf azure web page sharepoint Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi73-part545

4.52
PART 4
more resistors should be used in series for R6 to reduce the voltage stress; 2 k7/V (0.5 mA) 
is suitable for this resistor network.
1.12.4 V
rms
Network
This parameter is a little more difficult to set up. A simple resistor-divider network is used 
to set the voltage on pin 4 to 1.2 V. The large 120-Hz attenuation provided by capacitors 
C1 and C2 ensures that the voltage on pin 4 is proportional to the mean value of the applied 
haversine.
The choice of capacitors is a compromise. Too little attenuation at 120 Hz will give 
undesirable modulation of the gain at the haversine frequency. Too large an attenuation 
will give a large delay in the response to input voltage changes. The values shown for 
C1 and C2 have been found to be a good compromise with the resistor values shown. 
Additional information on this selection is shown in the Micro Linear application notes.
To prevent excessive current below the brownout voltage, the divider ratio is calculated 
at the mean brownout voltage (200 V) to give 1.2 V at pin 4. The mean value of the hav-
ersine voltage from BR1 applied to the network will be
0.9V
rms
 0.9 r      V
The ratio of the divider network will be 180/1.2  150:1. Hence the resistor ratio is
R
R
R
1
2
13
150 1

:
Once again, R1 may be two series resistors to reduce voltage stress.
1.12.5 Loop Compensation
The voltage error amplifier is compensated by C5, C6, and R5. Because the amplifier is a 
transconductance type, the compensation components are returned to the common return, 
rather than to the inverting input. This reduces noise pickup and removes the voltage-
divider resistors R6 and R14 from the compensation loop.
Unity gain is chosen to occur well below the line frequency; the optimum calculations 
are shown in application note 33.
The current loop is much faster, and again a transconductance amplifier (IEA) is used. 
In this case, the compensation components C3, C4, and R4 are retumed to the7.5-V refer-
ence, to provide soft start to the PFC section. Application note 33 provides the information 
to optimize the current-loop compensation.
1.13 BUCK SECTION DRIVE STAGE
The internal organization of the ML4826 is shown in Fig. 4.1.24. The lower part of the 
control circuit (the pulse-width modulator stage) is intended to provide the drive to a 
push-pull transformer of an isolated DC/DC converter. For this reason, two drive outputs 
alternate between pins 13 and 14 (180° out of phase). Each output will have a maximum 
duty cycle range of 0 to 48% of the total period. The ML4826-1 produces an alternate drive 
pulse on pin 13 or pin 14 for each drive pulse on pin 15 (the PFC boost section drive).
Copy pages from pdf to new pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages in pdf; copy page from pdf
Copy pages from pdf to new pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.53
However, in this application (Fig. 4.1.22), the buck output stage has a single power 
switching FET, Q2. For the buck stage to obtain an output of 400 V on C4 from the 450-V 
input on C1 (the voltage on C1 is the output of the boost stage), the maximum effective 
duty ratio must go to 89%. This can be obtained by linking both IC outputs (pins 13 and 14) 
to a single drive stage for Q2. (This interface block is shown in Fig. 4.1.23 as the “PWM 
Drive” block.)
This parallel connection of pins 13 and 14 cannot be made directly, as each drive is 
active in both its high and low states and there would be a conflict between the two drive 
stages. A special drive buffer is used in this application to “or” the two drive signals and 
obtain an effective duty cycle of up to 89% for the buck regulator stage, while retaining an 
active turn-“off” and turn-“on” action for Q2.
1.13.1 PWM Drive Circuit
Figure  4.1.27  shows  the  drive  circuit.  Alternate  rectangular,  pulse-width-modulated 
pulses are applied to inputs J6 and J7 via pins 13 and 14 on the IC. Diodes Dl and D2 
“or” these pulses via R4 to the input of the totem-pole driver transistors Q3 and Q4 and 
to the output J5.
At full pulse width, the 48% duty ratio pulses from pins 13 and 14 interleave to provide 
an effective 98% duty ratio at the output. This ratio is adjustable down to zero. D1 and D2 
provide active turn-“on” of Q3, but are not active during turn-“off.” Active turn-“off” is 
provided by Q1, Q2, and Q4, which turn “on” during the trailing edge of the applied drive 
waveform to pull down on Q3 and Q4. R6 maintains a low condition for the remainder of 
the zero drive pulse condition.
FIG. 4.1.27 Buck stage drive buffer, with “or” function to provide a wide range for the duty ratio.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test1.pdf"); PDFDocument pdf2 = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test2
delete page from pdf file online; delete pages of pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim pdf As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument
delete pages on pdf online; add and remove pages from pdf file online
4.54
PART 4
This arrangement, together with the choice of the ML4826-1 IC, provides one power 
pulse to the buck transistor Q2 for each power pulse of the boost stage Q1. Pulse-width 
modulation is applied on the leading edge for Q1 and on the trailing edge for Q2.
1.13.2 Voltage Control Section
Reference to Fig. 4.1.22 shows that the output voltage is developed across C4, which is 
not directly referenced to the IC common line, pin 11. For correct voltage control, the 
IC requires an input to pin 6 with respect to pin 11 that is proportional to the differential 
voltage across C4.
Figure 4.1.23 shows the voltage feedback block, which provides a single level-shifted 
output to pin 6 of the control IC with respect to the common line, pin 11. This voltage is 
proportional to the output voltage of the buck section, as found across C4. Figure 4.1.28 
shows how this is obtained. It contains a differential amplifier A1 and a voltage error 
amplifier A2. The two inputs to A1 are the differential voltage from C4 (the output volt-
age of the buck stage). The output of A1 is a control voltage with respect to the common 
line pin 2 that is proportional to the differential output voltage on C4, as applied to pins 5 
and 4 of the block.
FIG. 4.1.28 Output voltage level-shifting circuit and voltage error amplifier stage with variable 
reference.
This control voltage is applied to the inverting input of the error amplifier A2 via R2. 
Simple pole zero loop compensation is provided by Cl, R1, and R2. Dl becomes forward-
biased and speeds up the loop in the event of a large transient increase in output voltage 
(as may occur when the load is suddenly reduced).
VR1 provides a variable reference to A1 and allows the output voltage to be adjusted. 
The output of A1 at pin 3 is a voltage with respect to the common pin 2, which may be 
applied directly to the PWM control input of the IC at pin 6.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 Dim doc2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath2 GetPage(2) Dim pages = New PDFPage() {page0
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from pdf preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position Copying and Pasting Pages. You can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of
delete page pdf file; acrobat remove pages from pdf
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.55
1.13.3 Setting Up the PWM Component Values
The control components external to the IC are shown in Fig. 4.1.23, and the control IC 
is shown in Fig. 4.1.24. Unlike the case with the PFC section, very little calculation is 
required to establish the optimum values of the pulse-width modulator components.
1. Soft start. A capacitor (C11) on pin 5 sets the soft-start delay and ramp-up period of 
thePWM buck drive stage. The capacitor on this pin is charged from the IC at a constant 
current of 50 MA, and will provide a delay and then a progressively increasing pulse 
width as the capacitor charges above 2.7 V.
The start of charge is delayed by Q1 and Q2 within the IC until both the supply 
voltage to the IC and the output voltage of the PFC boost stage have been correctly 
established. Full output is obtained when the voltage on pin 5 ramps up to near the 
peak value of the ramp on pin 9, plus a 1.5-V offset. The typical peak ramp voltage will 
be 5 V. Hence, C11 is selected to reach 6.5 V within the required soft-start time, when 
charged at a constant current of 50 MA.
2. Current limit. A fast-acting, pulse-by-pulse peak-current limit is provided by com-
parator A2 within the IC. The limiting voltage on pin 10 is 1 V, and the external shunt 
R
T
is chosen to give this voltage at the required peak current in Q2.
In this topology, the peak current in Q2 is also the peak output current, which is to 
be 8 A. Hence R
T
is set to 0.13 7. (A 10-W resistor is required.) Some noise rejection is 
provided by R12 and C12, and fine current adjustment is provided by R11.
3. Ramp 2. ThePWM modulator ramp is defined by R10 and C10. These values are devel-
oped as shown in the Micro Linear data sheet and application notes 16, 33, and 34.
1.14 POWER COMPONENTS
Figure 4.1.22 shows the major power components external to the control circuits. Of par-
ticular interest are the inductors L1 and L2 and the larger capacitors C1 and C4. Since 
there are no absolute equations for the selection of these components, it can be difficult to 
decide on the optimum values.
In practice, the choice depends on several factors related to required performance, 
application, stress, temperature, cooling, weight, size, and cost, and so the selection is 
often a compromise. In general, as regards best performance, the larger these components 
are, the better. The following are some guidelines that should help the designer in this 
selection process.
1.14.1 L1 Inductor (Choke) Size
In this example, L1 is the power factor inductor, or more correctly choke, since it has a DC 
component. The main function of L1 is to limit the current flow from the low-impedance 
supply into Q1 when Q1 is turned “on,” connecting L1 to the common line. Since the mode 
is to be continuous by design, the choke is also required to maintain the input current flow 
nearly constant during a switching cycle; hence it will maintain a current flow into C1 via 
D1 when Q1 is “off.”
Maximum Choke Size. Clearly a very large inductance will meet the above requirements 
much better than a small inductance, so is there a maximum limit? Again, clearly there is, 
as the choke should not be so large as to impede the flow of the 120-Hz haversine current.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Copy this demo code to your C# application to rotate the first page of One is used for rotating all PDF pages to 180 in clockwise and output a new PDF file
delete page on pdf; delete pages pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to
delete pages pdf file; best pdf editor delete pages
4.56
PART 4
We can get an approximate limiting value for the inductance by calculating the value 
required to limit the input current at 120 Hz to the required full load current at the nominal 
input voltage without any other components, as follows:
Input voltage nominal  277 V rms
Input power at 90% efficiency  2.4 kW
Input current P/V  8.8 A rms
Maximum reactance of L1 at 120 Hz  V
rms
/I
rms
 31 7
Hence, the maximum inductance would be of the order of 40 mH. This would be a very 
large choke at 8.8 A, and it is clear that it is very unlikely that the maximum inductance 
would become a limiting factor in any real design.
Minimum Choke Size. We now consider the factors limiting the minimum inductance. 
Reducing the inductance will increase the switching frequency ripple current. Large ripple 
currents directly stress the switching components Q1 and D1 and the output capacitor C1. 
Less directly, they put additional demands on the line input RFI filter, since the ripple cur-
rent flows via the input bridge rectifier BR1 to the filter. Hence, if L1 is small, a larger RFI 
filter would be required in order to give acceptable noise current at the line input. Any one 
or more of these may become the limiting factor on the minimum size of L1.
In particular, some conducted-mode RFI specifications apply strict limits on the low-
frequency line noise down as far as 10 kHz. Since a small L1 will increase the require-
ments of the line filter, it is often more cost-effective to increase the inductance of L1, 
rather than use a larger line filter.
An arbitrary factor often used to define the inductance of L1 is to choose to limit the 
peak ripple current to some reasonable percentage of the peak loading current; typically 
ripple currents in the range of 5 to 20% are used.
1.14.2 L1 Choke Design Parameters
For this design, we will work on the basis of a maximum of 15% ripple current so that we 
can calculate a median arbitrary value for L1.
Since the haversine input voltage to L1 changes throughout the cycle, the duty cycle 
also changes and the switching frequency ripple current will change throughout the 
haversine cycle. Maximum ripple current will occur when the haversine voltage is half 
the output voltage, at which point the duty cycle is 50%. L1 can then be calculated as 
follows:
The maximum input current occurs at full load and minimum input voltage. 
Hence
V
in
minimum (V
min
) 220 V rms
Maximum input power (P
m
) at 90% efficiency  2400 W 
RMS input current  P
m
/V
min
 10.9 A rms 
(4.1.7)
Peak choke current at 120 Hz 
2I
max
 1.414 r 10.9 15.4 A
(4.1.8)
Hence
Peak-to-peak ripple current  15% I
peak
 2.3 A
(4.1.9)
The output voltage on C1 is 450 V. Maximum ripple current will occur when V
haversine
is 
1/2 V
out
, or 225 V. At this point the duty ratio will be 50%, and at 50 kHz, Q1 will be “on” 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Open a document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); PDFPage page = (PDFPage)pdf.GetPage(0); // Extract all images on one pdf page.
delete page from pdf preview; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
RootPath + "\\" 2.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_6.pdf"; // open a PDF file PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
delete page in pdf file; delete pdf pages online
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.57
for 10 Ms. There will be a near linear rate of change of current in L1 when Q1 is “on,” as 
follows:
di
dt


r
23
10
230 10
3
.
s
A/s
M
Since L di/dt  e (the applied voltage of 225 V),
L
r

225
230 10
098
3
. mH
(4.1.10)
Hence, the value of L1 for 15% ripple current (2.3 A p-p) would be 1 mH. The value is 
arbitrary, and larger or smaller values may be chosen, depending on the tradeoff required 
between ripple current performance and the size, weight, and cost of the choke.
It should be noticed that L1 has a unidirectional 120-Hz haversine applied to it. The 
peak current in L1 is 15.4 A [Eq. (4.1.8)]. The change in the 120-Hz current at the peak 
of the haversine is relatively slow (compared with the switching frequency); hence, for 
the choke design, the peak 15.4 A can be considered a DC current. Therefore, the choke 
must not saturate at 15.4 A DC plus half the high-frequency ripple current component of 
2.3 A [Eq. (4.1.9)], and a maximum current of 16.6 A DC would be used for the choke 
design.
The relatively small high-frequency ripple current leads to low switching losses in the 
choke core and favors the use of low-cost, low-permeability, iron powder cores for this 
application. If ferrite cores are preferred, then a suitable air gap must be used to prevent 
saturation of the core by the DC component.
1.14.3 Choke L1, Applied Design
In general, suitable design methods for L1 will be found in Part 3, Chaps. 1, 2, and 3. An 
example of one particular design for this application is also shown in Appendix 1.A.
L1 Design Parameters
Inductance: 1 mH [Eq.(4.1.10)]
Peak current: 16.6 A 
Maximum mean current: 10.9 A rms 
Ripple current: 2.3 A p-p (0.663 A rms) [Eq. (4.1.9)] 
Frequency: 50 kHz
Output voltage maximum: 450 V DC 
Input voltage for maximum ripple current: 225 V 
Duty ratio at 225 V: 50%  10 Ms
Copper Loss. The winding copper loss (I2
R loss) in this type of choke should be given 
special consideration. It is common practice to neglect the loss caused by the relatively 
small ripple current, because the DC current component is typically much larger (in this 
example, 10.9 A rms compared to 0.663 A rms).
Since, in simple terms, the loss is proportional to I
rms
2R
c
, where R
c
is the winding resis-
tance, it would appear that the contribution from the 120-Hz component would be 126 R
c
4.58
PART 4
and the contribution from the 50-kHz component would be only 0.44 R
c
F
r
, where F
r
is the 
ratio of ac to DC resistance at 50 kHz, and thus it would appear reasonable to neglect the 
loss due to high-frequency ripple.
Further, it would also appear that the skin effect (which is much more applicable to the 
high-frequency ripple) could also be neglected. Hence, it is common practice to use a single 
solid wire for the choke winding.
However, calculations in Appendix 1.A show that this simplistic approach is not valid, 
because with a single solid wire, the ac/DC resistance ratio F
r
can be very large, and so 
stranded wire should be used for best results in this example.
1.14.4 L2 Choke Size
L2 is the output buck regulator choke. Once again, the choice of inductance for L2 is 
arbitrary. Large values of inductance give low ripple currents, but are large and expensive 
and may limit the output current slew rate (load transient response).
Small values of inductance will give large ripple currents and will result in a change 
from continuous conduction to discontinuous conduction at a higher minimum current. 
Large ripple currents will stress Q2, D2, and C4 and result in larger output ripple volt-
ages.
As with L1, L2 is often designed for a ripple current in the range of 5 to 20% of the 
peak-to-peak value. The maximum ripple current will occur when the output voltage is 
half the supply voltage, at which point the duty cycle is 50%.
In this example, the input voltage is 450 V. The maximum output current is to be 8 A. 
The frequency is the same (50 kHz). Hence, L2 may be calculated in a way similar to that 
shown in Sec. 1.14.1.
The buck stage input voltage (from C1) is 450 V constant. With V
out
set at 225 V, Q2 will 
be “on” or 50% duty, or 10 Ms in this example, and the voltage across L2 is 225 V for 10 Ms.
There will be a linear increase in current in L2 when Q2 is “on”; hence
Maximum output current
ADC
Peak-to-peak r
8
iipple at
Ap-p
s
10
08
08
10
22
%
.
.



di
dt
L
di
dt
M
55
28
and
mH
L .
Once again, an iron powder core may be used for this choke. The design is covered more 
fully in Part 3, Chaps. 1, 2, and 3. The choke must support a DC current of 8.8 A maxi-
mum. The particular design approach shown in Appendix 1.A may be used, with the DC 
current reduced to 8.8 A and the inductance increased to 2.8 mH.
1.14.5 Capacitor Selection
C4. The output capacitor C4 is not very highly stressed, as the ripple current from L2 into 
C4 is a continuous triangular waveform at a maximum of 0.8 A p-p. However, the load 
may have large ripple currents, and if so, this must be considered in the selection of C4. 
Otherwise, a simple low-ESR electrolytic capacitor of a size that will give an acccptable 
output ripple voltage would be selected. The voltage rating should be at least as high as the 
supply voltage (in this case, 450 V).
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.59
C1. C1 is a quite different proposition. This capacitor must carry the 120-Hz haversine 
current and the switching frequency current. It should be noticed that the current from D1 
into C1 is discontinuous at the switching frequency (when Q1 is “on,” the current in D1 
is zero).
The use of leading-edge modulation on Q1 and trailing-edge modulation on Q2 will reduce 
the ripple current in C1, because as Q1 turns “off” and D1 conducts current into C1, Q2 will 
turn “on” and divert current away from C1. The overall effect has been shown89 to reduce 
the effective ripple current in C1 by up to 30%.
The current applied to C1 is a near-rectangular waveform at the switching frequency, 
which changes in amplitude throughout the applied haversine. Hence C1 must have a low 
impedance at the switching frequency and must be large enough to give an acceptably 
low ripple voltage at the 120-Hz haversine frequency (that is, it must have a low ESR and 
a high capacitance). At high power it is difficult to satisfy both requirements in a single 
component.
Figure 4.1.29 shows a method that can be used in high-power applications to reduce 
the stress on C1. C1 is split into one or more electrolytic capacitors C1a and C1b and one 
or more film capacitors C2a and C2b. The film capacitors are intended to take most of the 
high-frequency current and the electrolytic capacitors the low-frequency current.
FIG. 4.1.29 Boost input stage with inrush limiting current bypass diode D3, and ripple 
current steering arrangements.
The electrolytic capacitors will have large capacitance values (typically 470 MF or 
more in this application), and the film capacitors will be quite small. (A typical 3.3-MF
450-V metalized polyester film capacitor may have a ripple current rating of 15 A or so 
at 50 kHz.)
To encourage the high-frequency current to flow in the film capacitors, a resistance is 
placed in series with each electrolytic capacitor. In this example, an NTC (negative tem-
perature coefficient thermistor) is used. This also provides inrush protection, as explained 
in Sec. 1.14.6. High-frequency ripple currents are best minimized in the electrolytic capac-
itors, as they tend to flow in a small section of the foil near the terminals, causing local 
heating in the capacitor.
4.60
PART 4
We can establish a suitable resistance value for the NTC by calculating the impedance 
of the film capacitors at the switching frequency. Assume two 3.3-MF film capacitors are 
used in parallel.
X
fC
c


1
2
096
P
.
for each capacitor, to give
7
atotal of  0 .5 7
If 2 7 is chosen as the working resistance of each NTC, then two-thirds of the high-
frequency ripple current will flow in the film capacitors.
However, the NTCs will increase the low-frequency ripple voltage at the output of C1 
as follows:
Each 470-MF capacitor will have an impedance at 120 Hz of 2.8 7, and the NTC will 
approximately double the ripple voltage. Since half the ripple current flows in each elec-
trolytic capacitor, at the maximum input current of 15 A the peak-to-peak ripple voltage 
will be approximately 28 V (in a DC of 450 V), or about 6%. This is quite satisfactory 
for the intended application.
1.14.6 Inrush Current Limiting
Refer to the basic PFC stage, shown in Fig. 4.1.22. When first turned “on,” the capacitor 
C1 is discharged, and current will flow via L1 and D1 into C1 to charge the capacitor. If 
the unit is turned “on” at the peak of the applied line voltage (430 V), the rate of change 
of current in L1 would be 287 A/ms, and clearly a very large current would flow before 
the half cycle is finished.
Since L1 will have been designed to saturate at some current above 15 A, it is likely 
that L1 will be saturated. If Q1 turns “on” when L1 is near saturation, the current will not 
be limited, and Q1 will fail.
Figure 4.1.29 shows a better arrangement, in which L1 is shunted by diode D3. Also, 
the large electrolytic capacitors have NTCs in series with them. Although the NTC is 
chosen to have a hot resistance of 2 7 or less, when cold the resistance will be typically 
50 7, and the inrush current will be limited to <20 A. With D3 shunting the inductor L1, 
the inrush current is diverted away from the inductor, preventing saturation. When C1 is 
fully charged and the boost circuit is active, D3 is reverse-biased and is out of the circuit.
In normal operation, the ripple current in the electrolytic capacitors will maintain heat-
ing of the NTCs and hence maintain their low resistance.
1.14.7 Low-Loss Snubber Circuit
Figure 4.1.30 shows a low-loss snubber circuit. The high voltage and fast switching of Q1 
and Q2 tend to result in voltage spikes on these components during the high-current turn-
“off” edge. These effects should be minimized by good layout, and can be further reduced 
by snubber circuits.
Simple snubber circuits are lossy and will dissipate transient energy in a snubber resis-
tor. In high-power applications this energy may be quite large. Figure 4.1.30 shows a low-
loss snubber circuit in which the recovered energy is used to drive a 24-V cooling fan and 
useful work is done.
The snubber works as follows: Consider Q1 during the turn-“off” edge. As the voltage 
on the Q1 drain rises, the previous drain current is diverted via C5 and D3 into the large 
storage capacitor C7. This reduces the rate of change of voltage on the Q1 drain and much 
reduces any tendency for voltage overshoot.
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.61
At the end of turn-“off,” the voltage across C5 will be the voltage on C1 (450 V) minus 
the 24 V on C7. When Q1 turns “on,” the left side of C5 goes to zero and the right side 
of C5 goes negative by 426 V, reverse-biasing D3 and bringing D5 into conduction. The 
negative voltage applied to L3 will cause current to flow in L3 in the direction shown. 
With Q1 now fully “on,” this current will charge the right side of C5 positive until D3 
conducts at  24 V, at which time the current will continue to charge C7. The time con-
stants of L3 and C5 and the 24 V are chosen to ensure that the current in L3 has dropped 
to a low level before Q1 turns “on” again. This returns C5 and L3 to their original state 
for the next turn-“off of Q1. The same action applies for Q2, with C6, D4, and D6. Z1 
clamps C7 at 24 V, but the main loading is the 24-V fan. C5 and C6 are selected to just 
provide the required fan current.
Note:At the time of going to press with this third edition (the 2008-1010 depression years), 
the semiconductor industry was going through a rapid restructuring. Micro Linear was 
taken over by Unitrode and then Unitrode was taken over by Texas Instruments. As a result 
the Micro Linear ML4826 went out of manufacture at that time. (We can only hope that this 
excellent IC will be made again.) However, the principles described above apply to many 
similar ICs and for that reason it is still included here.
FIG. 4.1.30 Low-loss voltage snubber circuit with 24-V fan drive.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested