c# pdf reader table : Delete pdf pages Library software component .net wpf web page mvc Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi75-part547

4.72
PART 4
we still have simultaneous voltage and current in Q1. This is also very dissipative, and is 
shown in plot C from T
2
to T
3
.
Figure 4.2.1(C) shows the dissipation in Q1 peaking at 2,000 watts during the switching 
action. Notice that even if the switching speed increases (faster device) the peak dissipation 
remains the same. With a faster device the average power loss would be reduced, because the 
area under the power curve would be reduced, but the peak value would remain the same.
The important point is that the peak dissipation in Q1 is 2 kW and will remain at this 
value even if the switching speed of Q1 is faster because it is an intrinsic property of the 
hard switching action. In practice, snubbers (load line shaping) will be used to reduce the 
peak stress in Q1, but in general these simply divert the loss to other components. A similar 
action takes place during the turn-“off” of Q1.
This demonstrates a major disadvantage of hard switching. Other hard switching topol-
ogies have different loss problems, and although various methods have been developed 
to reduce such losses, the intrinsic problem remains and tends to limit the useful working 
frequency to less than 200 kHz.
We can summarize the major properties of hard switching as follows:
2.2.3 Limitations
1. Intrinsically high switching loss
2. Limited working frequency range (due to high switching loss)
3. Wide spectrum EMI noise due to fast switching edges
4. Load line shaping required
5. High stress in switching devices
6. High reverse recovery currents in power diodes
2.2.4 Advantages
1. A very well established technology with many well-proven topologies. Many books and 
application notes, and a wide range of control ICs are available
2. Can accommodate a wide range of line and load variations
3. No tuned circuits so less current in wound components and switching devices; less I2R loss
4. Easy to understand and design
5. Layout and wound component designs less critical
We will now consider the action of a fully resonant switching power supply.
2.3 FULLY RESONANT SWITCHING SYSTEMS
There are a wide range of resonant switching systems. It tends to be a specialist area and a 
full coverage of the subject is beyond the scope of this book. If the reader requires a fully 
comprehensive coverage, then I recommend looking at the extensive bibliography in the 
References section for specialist books and papers on this subject.
In this chapter we will study a fully resonant system used to power fluorescent lamps 
(often called ballast in the industry). This will allow us to see some of the advantages and 
limitations of fully resonant systems.
Delete pdf pages - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf file; delete pages in pdf
Delete pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank pages in pdf online; reader extract pages from pdf
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
4.73
2.3.1 Series and Parallel Resonance
Resonant systems may use series resonance or parallel resonance. It is important to under-
stand that the performance of each type is quite different. 
Figure 4.2.2 shows some basic parameters of a series resonant system in (A), (B), and 
(C), and a parallel resonant system in (D) and (E). Both arrangements are used in ballast 
systems for fluorescent lamps. (There are many other arrangements that can be used.)
We start with some basic considerations of the series resonant method as used in a 
ballast supply.
FIG. 4.2.2 (A) shows the outline schematic of a series resonant L/C circuit commonly 
used in fluorescent lamp applications. The lamp load (R
Lamp
) is normally connected across 
the resonant capacitor C1 as shown. (B) shows the equivalent circuit with the lamp load 
converted to its equivalent series resistance ESR
Lamp
(C) shows the impedance of the series 
circuit for frequencies from just below to just above resonance. Notice the impedance is 
lowest at resonance. (D) shows a parallel resonant circuit where again the lamp load is 
connected across the capacitor C1. (E) shows the impedance of the parallel tuned circuit 
where a maximum value of R
Lamp
is found at resonance.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page pdf online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from a pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
4.74
PART 4
2.3.2 Voltage Fed Series Resonant Ballast
A series resonant ballast, shown in Fig. 4.2.2(A), requires that L1 and C1 are in series 
across a switched sine or square wave supply. The impedance plot Fig. 4.2.2(C) shows the 
characteristics. We have a narrow frequency pass network that filters out the harmonics of 
the square wave input, and allows the fundamental switching frequency through so that a 
sine wave appears across the capacitor C1. In ballast applications, the lamp load (R
Lamp
) is 
typically connected across the capacitor C1 as shown.
By inspection, we can see that before the lamp strikes, the effective load R
Lamp
is open 
circuit and at the resonant frequency, C1 takes out L1. The effective series resistance (ESR)
is very low, being limited to R
L1
(the resistance of the inductor).
Hence, we can immediately see a potential major disadvantage of the series circuit, 
in that before the lamp strikes, the start up current can be very high. To its advantage the 
voltage across the capacitor (I
in
X
C1
) will be large during start up, and since the lamp is 
across C1, the lamp should strike very rapidly.
For instant start lamps this aggressive start action may be acceptable, but a delay is 
better for rapid start lamps so that the cathodes can be pre-heated. Failure to do this results 
in cathode stripping and premature darkening of the ends of the lamps.
After the lamp strikes, it will have a finite resistance, and this will reduce the input 
current. This may be counterintuitive, and is best understood by considering the “effective 
series resistance” (ESR
Lamp
) presented by the lamp load, as seen in Fig. 4.2.2(B). Notice 
that for values of Q 3, it can be shown91 that the effective series resistance of the lamp is 
approximately
ESR
Lamp
R
Lamp
/Q2
If we define Q as (WR
Lamp
C1), (the quality factor for the LCR circuit), then at resonance 
WC1 becomes a constant (say K).
Hence ESR
Lamp
is proportional to R
Lamp
/(K R
Lamp
)2
Since (K R
Lamp
)2changes much faster than R
Lamp
, as R
Lamp
increases the effective input 
resistance of the network (ESR
Lamp
) tends to zero as R
Lamp
increases.
Where ESR
Lamp
 Effective series resistance of the lamp (ohms)
R
Lamp
 Lamp resistance at the working current (ohms)
W 2P f
With an open circuit lamp, input resistance tends to zero and the current is limited only by 
the resistance of L1 (that is very low). Hence the start up current can be very high before 
the lamp strikes.
At resonance, when the lamp is working, Z is the ESR of the lamp load R
Lamp
as shown 
in the impedance plot shown in Fig. 4.2.2(C). The impedance of the series L1, C1 is near 
zero as C1 takes out L1. The value of the applied voltage and the effective series resistance 
of the lamp (ESR
Lamp
) now define the input current and lamp power at resonance. 
The voltage across the lamp is the capacitor voltage (V
C1
) and will be near QV
in
. At 
frequencies above resonance the inductor predominates and the load current is reduced. 
At frequencies below resonance the capacitor predominates and again the load current is 
decreased. Figure 4.2.2(C) shows how the magnitude of the impedance /Z/ changes with 
frequencies above and below the resonant frequency.
Hence, in the series resonant circuit, changing the frequency on either side of resonance 
provides a means of controlling the load power and this type of circuit can be used where 
lamp dimming is required. Notice that near resonance, any tendency for the lamp to stop 
conducting results in an increase in Q, and hence an increase in the voltage across C1 and 
the lamp. This tends to maintain lamp operation at reduced power outputs. Hence, this 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages of pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
cut pages out of pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
4.75
type of series resonant circuit is considered a high impedance frequency related adjustable 
power source, making it suitable for both fixed output and lamp dimming applications.
2.4 CURRENT FED PARALLEL 
RESONANT BALLAST
We will now consider a specific example of a fully resonant self-oscillating current fed 
parallel ballast design, to demonstrate some of the advantages and limitations of resonant 
systems. Figure 4.2.2(D) shows the basic elements of a parallel resonant current fed ballast. 
Notice that the resonant components L
P1
and L
P2
, and C1 form a parallel tank circuit and the 
lamp load R
Lamp
is again connected across C1.
Figure 4.2.2(E) shows how the magnitude of the impedance of the parallel resonant 
circuit changes with frequency, near the resonant frequency. Notice the impedance of the 
parallel tuned circuit is at a maximum near resonance.
Although both the series and parallel circuits produce sine wave currents and voltages 
in the lamp load, the operation and characteristics are quite different. Whereas the series 
resonant circuit tends to a low impedance voltage source, the parallel circuit tends to a high 
impedance current source.
Figure 4.2.3 shows a working schematic for a current fed, self-oscillating parallel reso-
nant ballast. Figure 4.2.4 (A-I) show the waveforms obtained in this design.
FIG. 4.2.3 Shows the schematic of a functional prototype of a parallel resonant 30-kHz sine 
wave 68-watt electronic ballast designed for two F32T8 4-ft instant start lamps. The input is 
a nominal single phase 60 Hz 110 v line supply. An over-winding P3 on the main transformer 
T1 provides the high striking voltage required for these lamps, and capacitors C3 and C4 
provide current limiting. Depending on the application, safety agency requirements may 
require P3 to be a totally isolated winding, driving the lamps directly and isolating the lamps 
and sockets from the ac line input.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete page from pdf file online; cut pages from pdf reader
4.76
PART 4
The function is best explained by considering the action of the input choke L1. This 
choke has a relatively large inductance, intended to maintain the input current near constant 
throughout a cycle. (The ripple current is shown in Fig. 4.2.4(H).)
The input to the choke (V
in
) is a DC supply. (In this example the rectified 110-V RMS 
60-Hz line input gives 150 volts DC.) As a result of the resonant tank circuit, we will see 
that the output voltage from the choke at the center of the resonating inductor (node “A” on 
the schematic), is a haversine as shown in Fig. 4.2.4(A).
For steady-state current conditions in the choke, the volt seconds in the forward direc-
tion at 150V DC must equal the reverse volt seconds. This condition is satisfied when the 
area of the waveform above 150V equals the area of the waveform below 150 volts, as 
shown in Fig. 4.2.4(A) at “a” and “b.” This will be found where the average DC value of 
FIG. 4.2.4 (A-D) shows the waveforms expected from the parallel resonant 
ballast shown in Fig. 4.2.3. All waveforms are shown with respect to the lower 
common rail (DC return) using a dual channel oscilloscope and an isolation 
transformer on the 110 volt ac supply. The top trace (A) is the voltage at node 
“A” the output of L1. The second trace (B) is the voltage at node “D.” Trace 
(C) is the voltage at node “B” and the lower trace (D) is the voltage across 
the resonating capacitor C2 using two probes and dual channel input on the 
oscilloscope.
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pdf pages reader
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete page in pdf online
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
4.77
the haversine is equal to the DC input voltage. When this condition is satisfied, the choke 
magnetizing current will remain constant. The peak voltage for the above conditions will 
be PV
DC
/2 or 1.57 V
DC
making the peak value 235 volts. Notice this voltage is well defined 
and is an intrinsic characteristic of the choke input circuit.
Applying this peak haversine to the center tap of the primary at node “A,” with say 
Q1 turned “on” will cause the voltage at the collector of Q2 (node “B”) to go to twice this 
value by transformer action, giving a peak voltage of PV
DC
or 470 volts in this example. 
So when Q1 turns “on” and Q2 “off,” the collector of Q2 node “B” will follow a half sine 
wave as shown in Fig. 4.2.4(C) as a result of the action of the tuned tank circuit formed by 
the inductance of the transformer/inductor P1 and P2, and C2.
At the end of the half cycle, as the voltage on Q2 reaches zero, Q1 will turn “off” and 
Q2 will turn “on” and the voltage on Q1 will now follow a similar half sine wave as shown 
in Fig. 4.2.4(B), and the process will continue.
FIG. 4.2.4 (E-I) shows the drive waveforms on the base of Q1 and Q2. Notice 
the large negative voltage swing used to establish the drive current in L2. Trace 
(F) shows Q1 and Q2 collector currents at full load. Trace (G) shows the lamp 
current, trace (H) the current in L1, and trace (I) the current in L2.
4.78
PART 4
Although for ease of description we have considered the choke as being the cause of 
the waveforms, and the tuned circuit the effect, in fact the tuned circuit stores the majority 
of the energy and defines the waveform. The voltage across C2 builds up during the ini-
tial start action until the above conditions are satisfied. (Lower voltages cause the choke 
magnetizing current to increase and higher voltages will cause it to decrease so the circuit 
self-stabilizes at the optimum value.) 
The waveform across C2 is shown in Fig. 4.2.4(D).
When the circuit is loaded, the current in the choke (I
L1
) is defined by the load because 
the mean magnetizing current is zero. However the voltage across the tuned circuit is still 
constrained to satisfy the foreword and reverse volt second requirements of the choke in 
the longer term.
Although the lamp loads may be driven directly by the tapped inductor/auto transformer 
as shown in Fig. 4.2.3, safety agency requirements require DC isolation between primary 
and output, and more often the lamps will be supplied from a separate winding on the 
inductor/transformer, making it a combination of a true transformer with a primary that has 
an inductor function.
2.4.1 Synchronous Base Drive
Synchronous base drive is provided by a feedback winding S1 on the transformer/inductor. 
This winding is connected in anti-phase, so as to provide a positive drive to the “on” tran-
sistor. Figure 4.2.4(E) shows the Q1 base drive voltage waveform. This winding effectively 
steers the base drive current from L2 into the “on” transistor base emitter junction.
Notice the “on” transistor clamps the positive base drive voltage end of the winding S1 
to a value of the V
be
of the “on” transistor plus a D7 or D8 diode drop (about 1.2 volts). This 
clamping action forces the voltage at the other end of S1 (connected to the “off” transistor 
base) to go far negative ( 7 volts in this example). The emitter diodes D7 and D8 prevent 
reverse base emitter breakdown. The large “off” bias allows the “off” transistors to with-
stand the higher V
cer
voltage rating of the device. (The reversed biased voltage rating (V
cer
)
is normally higher than the V
ceo
rating.)
In the drive circuit shown, the negative bias voltage on the “off” transistor is applied 
by the base diodes (D5 or D6) to an inductor resistor combination R2, L2. This sets up a 
current flow (I
L2
) in L2 from left to right, as defined by R2, that is shown in Fig. 4.2.4(I). 
This inductive current provides the turn-“on” drive to the “on”-going transistor at the 
beginning of the drive waveform, and it also supplies the drive current at the end of the 
half-cycle, in both cases when the drive voltage on S1 is very low. In fact this process 
turns both Q1 and Q2 “on” at the same time for a short period, when the voltage across 
the tank circuit, and hence S1, is near zero. This conduction overlap ensures that Q1 and 
Q2 cannot be “off” at the same time. Resistor R2 adjusts the drive current from L2, and 
hence the overlap period.
Note: If Q1 and Q2 were “off” at the same time, this would break the conduction path for 
the choke L1, and it would force a large voltage spike across Q1 or Q2 that would probably 
lead to transistor failure. Hence, overlap is standard for current driven circuits to prevent 
voltage punch through. (This corresponds to the way that a dead period is required in a 
voltage driven circuit, to prevent uncontrolled cross conduction.)
2.4.2 Zero Voltage Switching
Notice from the above that Q1 and Q2 turn “on” and “off” at zero voltage. There is a 
90° phase shift between current and voltage in the tank circuit so the current is not zero. 
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
4.79
(Notice the rate of change of voltage on Q1 and Q2, and hence on C2, is maximum at the 
time of switching, so the current will be maximum). As a result, current is flowing in Q1 
and Q2 during the switch action. However, since the voltage across Q1 and Q2 is near zero, 
the switching loss in Q1 and Q2 will be very low.
This demonstrates one of the major advantages of resonant mode switching action. 
The ability to reduce switching loss by switching at zero voltage (or in other designs zero 
current), allows much higher working frequencies without excessive switching loss.
2.4.3 Lamp Starting
For the short period when both switching devices are “on” additional forward volt sec-
onds are applied to the choke L1, and a larger voltage haversine is required to balance it; 
this increases the resonant voltage on L1 and the tank circuit in proportion to the overlap 
period. (Typically this will be about 10% during start up.) This increases the peak voltage 
on C2 during start up to say 520 volts peak, or 367 V RMS, but this is still too low for 
reliable starting.
The start voltage for the lamps is much higher than the normal running voltage. To get 
the extra voltage required to strike the lamps reliably, the extra winding P3 is provided. This 
steps the voltage up to 780 volts peak or 550 VRMS. This is high enough to ensure reliable 
lamp starting for the F32T8 instant start lamps used in this design.
2.4.4 Lamp Current
Capacitors C3 and C4 define the current into the lamps during normal operation. They drop 
the difference between the RMS working voltage of the lamp and the RMS voltage supplied 
by the resonant circuit and the P3 winding. They are sized to provide the required lamp 
current for 32 watts in each lamp.
2.4.5 Effective Resonant Capacitor (C
2e
)
When the lamps have struck and are running, C3 and C4 become part of the tank circuit 
and add to the effective value of the resonant capacitor C2. During start up, the lamps are 
open circuit and only C2 is active. As a result the frequency is higher before the lamps 
strike (about 70 kHz), and this is determined by C2 only. As the lamps strike, the frequency 
decreases as C3 and C4 are brought into the circuit and the working frequency drops to the 
required 31 kHz.
The windings P1, P2, and P3 all have the same number of turns (64 turns in this exam-
ple). If we neglect the working resistance of the lamps for a moment, the lamp capacitors 
C3 and C4 would be in parallel, and add and reflect back to the C2 position as approxi-
mately the turns ratio squared as follows:
C
t
 C3   C4  4.4 nF (when both lamps are burning)
This C
t
transfers through by the turns ratio squared, and adds to C2 to give the effective 
working capacitance C
2e
, hence;
C
2e
 (3/2)2C
t
 C2  2.25C
t
 C2  2.25(4.4)   2.2  12.1 nF
4.80
PART 4
Validation The above is at best an approximation as the load is complex, and there will be 
a phase shift between real and reactive components. With the lamps, this is difficult to 
determine. To validate the result, C3 and C4 were disconnected and C2 increased to get the 
same working frequency of 31 kHz obtained when the lamps were running. A value of 12.2 nF 
was found to give the required frequency so the simple approximation is valid. 
Hence the effective capacitance C
2e
of the tank circuit (P1 and P2) is 12.1 nF, the effective 
resonant current can be calculated as follows:
The reactance of C
2e
at the resonant frequency will be
X
fC
C e
e
2
2
3
9
1
2
1
2
31 10
12 1 10
424


r
r
r
r

P
P
.
7
The effective reactive current in C
2e
(I
C2e
) is
I
C2e
V
RMS
/X
C2e
 332/424  783 mA
The real component of current can be calculated from the total lamp power as follows
P
total
P
Lamp1
P
Lamp2
 32   32  64 watts
Neglecting losses, this reflects to C
2e
as defined by the tank voltage as follows
P
total
V
RMS
I
RMS
I
RMS(real)
 P
total
/V
RMS
 64/332  193 mA
2.4.6 Resonant Circuit Quality Factor Q
Q is the ratio of reactive current to real current in the tank circuit.
So the working Q  783/193  4.1
At this point we can appreciate a major disadvantage of a fully resonant system. It is clear 
from the above that the current in the transformer is 4 times greater than it would be in a 
non-resonant system. The copper loss in the windings is proportional to I2, so this loss is 
greater by a factor of over 16 times the non-resonant case. This requires a larger transformer 
and larger gauge windings to keep the temperature rise within acceptable limits.
It should be noticed that the current in P3 (Fig. 4.2.4(G), lamp current) is about 
0.460 amps RMS and the voltage on P3 is (3/2)332 or 498 V RMS, and the product is 
229 VA (this is the apparent power), compared with only 64 watts real power. So the 
transformer windings are being stressed at a level that they would be in a 229-watt 
hard switching application. So we can now see one of the major disadvantages of the 
fully resonant system. However, providing the wound components are designed for the 
larger reactive current, acceptable copper losses and transformer temperature rise can 
be maintained.
At higher frequencies, the number of turns required on the core and copper loss are 
reduced, so higher frequency operation (allowed by the reduction in switching loss) tends 
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
4.81
to offset the increased copper loss disadvantage at higher working frequencies. However, 
the lamp efficiencies tend to fall above 50 kHz.
In Chap. 3, we will see how quasi-resonant systems can reduce the copper loss disad-
vantage while retaining the reduced switching loss advantage.
2.5 WOUND COMPONENT DESIGN
To complete Chap. 2, we will look at the design of the wound components L1 and the 
transformer/inductor T1.
Part 3, Chaps. 1-6 provide in-depth design information for chokes and transform-
ers. However, the transformer/inductor T1 in this application has some rather spe-
cial requirements, as it provides the dual function of a transformer and a resonant 
inductor.
The choke L1 can be designed as shown in Part 3, Chaps. 1-3. However, it is not 
a very critical part, so for the time-strapped engineer a short cut method can be used 
to obtain a good working and optimum design in short order, and this method will be 
used here.
2.5.1 L1 Choke Design
I refer to L1 as a choke; this term is used where a considerable DC component of current 
is present. It is an important definition because unlike a pure inductor, a choke requires 
a different design approach. It requires a low permeability core (or an air gap) to prevent 
DC saturation.
In general the choke needs to be as large as possible to limit the switching fre-
quency ripple current at the input to as low a value as possible. Typically we aim to 
make the RMS ripple current less than 20% of the mean DC current. In this example 
(see Fig. 4.2.4(H)), the p-p ripple is 150 ma (about 53 ma RMS), and as the mean 
DC at full load current is 430 mA, giving about 12% ripple, this would be considered 
acceptable.
The design approach is very simple: choose a  core size consistent  with known 
size and cost requirements. Those familiar with ballast designs know that the choke 
core volume is typically about 25% of the main transformer volume, and the nearest 
core size in this example will be the EE 25/24 ferrite core, or for the iron powder core, 
the E100.
Note: Because the turns are high and the ripple current is low, core loss will be low, and 
low cost iron powder cores may be used, providing a cost reduction and avoiding the need 
for a core gap.
A single section bobbin is chosen for the EE25/24, and fully wound with a wire size selected 
for the full load mean input current.
Assuming an efficiency of 95%, the input current can be calculated as follows.
P
out
 64 watts, hence P
in
 64/0.95  67.4 watts, and at 150 volts input the current will 
be 67.4/150  449 mA.
A 27 AWG magnet wire is rated for 459 mA and would be suitable (see Table 3.1.1.), 
so the bobbin is fully wound with 230 turns of #27 AWG.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested