c# pdf reader table : Delete page in pdf application control utility html azure windows visual studio Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi77-part549

4.92
PART 4
Where e is the emf developed across the inductance, L
1e
is the effective inductance, and 
di/dt is the rate of change of current in the loop,
e
L di
dt
e

1
hence the rate of change of curre
nnt
di
dt
e
L
e

1
If e is small and L
1e
large, the rate of change of current is small, so the current remains 
near constant. This happens during the two free-wheeling cycles. However when e is large 
during a power transfer cycle, the rate of change of current in L
1e
will also be large.
3.7 POWER SWITCHING SEQUENCE
Figure 4.3.3 shows the path for current that flows in Q1, P1, L
1e
,R
1e
, and Q4 during the 
initial conditions, as described above. A rather involved sequence of events occurs dur-
ing each complete power conversion cycle, comprising twelve discrete states of operation. 
Henceforth, these states will be referred to by the transitions that mark their beginnings.
FIG. 4.3.3 Shows the active components in the primary bridge at the beginning of a 
control sequence, for steady state conditions. (It is assumed the unit has been running 
long enough to have established normal working conditions). Figure 4.3.3 is the start 
of a cycle of twelve transitions that form a complete cycle of operation. Figures 4.3.3 
through 4.3.14 show all the transitions in the cycle.
The initial condition shown in Fig. 4.3.3 assumes Q1 and Q2 are conducting and the 
current flow is as shown. Since this is an active power transfer condition, current will be 
flowing in the secondary winding S1, but this is not shown here.
Delete page in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf in reader; add and remove pages from a pdf
Delete page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf online; delete pages pdf preview
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.93
Before we embark on an in-depth analysis of these twelve states however, let us look briefly 
at the basic overall operation in Fig. 4.3.1 so we have an image of it while we examine the 
details. The twelve states can be grouped into four basic states per cycle of the converter, as 
shown in Fig. 4.3.20. For a given intermediate duty cycle, the converter spends the majority of 
the time in these 4 basic states. The first basic state is between transitions 3 and 4, when Q1 and 
Q2 are both “on,” nodes B and D are both high, the voltage across the transformer primary is 
zero, and no power is being transferred to the output. The second basic state is between transi-
tions 6 and 7, when Q2 and Q3 are both “on,” node B is low, node D is high, the voltage across 
the transformer primary is positive, and power is being transferred to the output. The third basic 
state is between transitions 9 and 10, when Q3 and Q4 are both “on,” nodes B and D are both 
low, the voltage across the transformer primary is zero, and no power is being transferred to the 
output.The fourth basic state is between transitions 12 and 1, when Q1 and Q4 are both “on,” 
node B is high, node D is low, the voltage across the transformer primary is negative, and power 
is being transferred to the output. Now we can proceed to the detailed operation.
3.7.1 First Transition (Q4 “Off”)
For the first transition, Q4 is turned “off” and Q1 maintained “on.” The effective current 
flow now changes to that shown in Fig. 4.3.4.
FIG. 4.3.4 The first transition, when Q4 turns “off” and current continues to flow into node 
“B” under the inductive forcing action of L
1e
.This will charge C2 and C4, taking node “B” 
positive.
When node B reaches the line voltage (plus a diode drop, 300.8 volts), diode D2 conducts 
and current continues to flywheel around the upper loop D2, Q1, P1, L
1e
, and R
1e
as shown. 
Notice that when node “B” is clamped at 300.8 volts by D2, there is no further voltage change 
at this node, the current in C4 stops, and the current in the lower current loop drops to zero.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from pdf online; delete blank page in pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages from a pdf reader; acrobat export pages from pdf
4.94
PART 4
Notice that immediately prior to Q4 turning “Off,” the voltage at node “B” has remained 
near zero for the period t
0
to t
1
as shown in Fig. 4.3.7(d). When Q4 turns “Off,” L
1e
main-
tains a constant current of 17 amps into node “B.” In general, the current splits between 
the upper and lower branch to charge C2 and C4, as shown, taking the voltage at node “B” 
towards 300 V. (This is best understood by considering the equivalent circuit shown in 
Fig. 4.3.5.)
3.7.2 Equivalent Circuit for First Transition
Since similar things happen during each of the twelve transitions, we will study the first 
Q4 transition in some detail. To better follow the charging action at nodes “B” and “D” the 
effective capacitance at the nodes will be described in more detail with the aid of simpli-
fied equivalent circuits. These are shown in Fig. 4.3.5 and 4.3.6, and the time dependant 
waveforms are shown in Fig. 4.3.7. The other transitions follow similar paths. The first two 
transitions are described in more detail in Fig. 4.3.5, 4.3.6, and 4.3.7.
For simplicity, Fig. 4.3.5 shows only the components that are active during the first 
transition. Since Q3 is not turned “on” and Q1 remains fully “on” throughout the period 
considered, these do not appear in this diagram. Due to the large input capacitor C
in
, we can 
assume the supply voltage from node “A” to node “C” does not change during the charge 
FIG. 4.3.5 Shows how the substrate capacitor C2 can be transposed to 
C
2e
and considered to be in parallel with C
4e
, as far as charge energy 
is concerned.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
copy page from pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page in pdf preview; delete pages on pdf
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.95
action, so the effective ac input impedance is very low. As a result, the two FET substrate 
capacitors C
2e
and C
4e
can be considered effectively to be in parallel, as far as the ac condi-
tions are concerned. The quasi-resonant action is more easily understood by moving C
2e
in parallel with C
4e
, as shown in Fig. 4.3.5. This will give a total node “B” capacitance of 
C
T
, which is twice C4. (In reality, all the parasitic capacitance related to node “B” would 
be included in this C
T
value.)
In the first transition starting at t
1
in Fig. 4.3.7, Q4 instantly turns “off” and the current 
established in L
1e
(17 amps) continues to flow into node “B”. (Remember, node “B” was 
near zero volts immediately prior to Q4 turning “off.”) A near constant current from L
1e
will 
continue to flow into node “B”, charging the total substrate capacitor C
T
, as shown in trace 
(c), progressively charging node “B” more positive. From t
1
to t
2
, the voltage on node “B” will 
increase towards the 300 volt supply line as the capacitors charge up, as shown in trace (d).
3.7.3 Second Transition (D2 Conducts)
In Fig. 4.3.5, we see that when node “B” voltage reaches 300 volts (as shown in 
Fig. 4.3.7(d), t
2
onward), the substrate diode D2 in Q2 will conduct and prevent any 
further increase in voltage at node “B”. With no further voltage change, capacitor charging 
stops as shown in Fig. 4.3.7(c) at t
2
. Current from L
1e
now freewheels around the upper 
loop, D2, P1, L
1e
, and R
1e
as shown in Fig. 4.3.6.
FIG. 4.3.6 Shows the equivalent circuit during the upper flywheel 
action. Only the active components are shown. Q1 is fully “on,” and Q4 
is fully “off.”
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages of pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete a page from a pdf online; delete page numbers in pdf
4.96
PART 4
FIG. 4.3.7 Shows the voltage and current waveforms during the 
first two transitions.
The upper trace (a) shows two possible conditions. In the first 
condition the energy stored in the loop (mainly in L
1e
) is sufficient 
to drive D2 into conduction and clamp the voltage at 300 volts. 
This will allow Q2 to turn on under ZVS conditions.
The second condition shows the trace for a low current, low 
energy condition where D2 does not conduct and ZVS is not 
possible.
Trace (b) shows the current in Q4 prior to turn “off” (t
0
to t
1
)
with the sudden transition to zero current at t
1
. (In practice the tran-
sition is not instantaneous, leading to switching loss as shown in 
Fig. 4.3.19.)
Trace (c) shows the charge current in C2 and C4 during the 
period when the voltage on node “B” is changing (t
1
to t
2
). At 
t
2
, node “B” is clamped at 300 volts, and since the voltage is not 
changing, the current in C2 and C4 drops to zero.
Trace (d) shows the voltage at node “D” going from zero to 
300 volts to be clamped by D2 at 300 volts (t
1
to t
2
).
Trace (e) shows Q2 being turned “on” under ZVS conditions at 
t
3
. Notice Q2 can be turned “on” under ZVS conditions anywhere 
betweent
2
and t
4
.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete page on pdf document; cut pages from pdf preview
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete page in pdf
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.97
3.7.4 Upper Freewheeling Action
Now that current has stopped in the substrate capacitors, we should refer to Fig. 4.3.6. We 
have seen that the upper current loop has current flowing via D2, P1, L
1e
, and R
1e
. Since the 
voltage at node “B” is not changing and Q4 is “off,” there is no current flow in the lower 
part of the circuit. This is called a free-wheeling period. I prefer the term “flywheel period,” 
because like its mechanical analogue, the loop has stored energy. Energy ½L
1e
I2 is stored 
in the inductor L
1e
and this maintains the current in the loop. This energy is also available 
to charge node “D” during the next transition.
We will see later that a similar, lower, current loop is set up in the eighth transition.
3.7.5 Third Transition (Q2 “On”)
At the start of the third transition, Q2 is still “off,” and D2 is conducting the free-wheeling 
current. At this point we have current free-wheeling around the upper loop as shown in 
Fig. 4.3.8. This “flywheel current” will continue to circulate around the loop, for the dura-
tion of the quiescent period. In fact, if nothing further happened, the current would continue 
circulating around this loop until the voltage dropped across R
1e
caused the current to decay 
to zero. Since the effective resistance of R
1e
during this process is very small (being simply 
the winding resistance of P1 and the distributed resistances of the active loop), this current 
could continue circulating for some time. Notice that during this period the voltage across the 
FIG. 4.3.8 Shows the third transition where Q2 turns “on” at t
3
under zero voltage 
conditions.The upper loop flywheel current transfers from D2 to the drain-source 
of the FET Q2. The voltage across main transformer T1, primary P1, is near zero 
and energy is not being transferred to the output. The upper flywheel current loop 
continues with little loss as the loop resistance is quite small. This is the first “off”
state of the bridge, and will continue for the “off” period. 
4.98
PART 4
transformer winding P1 is near zero, due to the secondary rectifier clamping action mentioned 
in Section 3.5.3, so energy is not being transferred to the secondary during the free-wheeling 
period. Since the volt drop in this loop is very low, current will continue to flow around the 
loop with only a slight reduction for the total non-active period of the bridge.
In normal operation (as Fig. 4.3.7 (a) shows), for zero-voltage switching, Q2 can be 
turned on at any time during the D2 clamping action from t
2
onwards. In this example Q2 
is turned “on” at t
3
, as shown in Fig. 4.3.7(e). The voltage across Q2 at that time will be 
only the D2 diode drop, so Q2 turns “on” under near zero-voltage conditions as required. 
In fact, if Q2 is turned “on” at any time when the substrate diode D2 is conducting, it turns 
“on” under zero-voltage conditions. Since Q2 is a power FET, when it turns “on,” it is able 
to conduct the reverse-flowing flywheel current and will take over conduction from D2.
3.7.6 Fourth Transition (Q1 “Off”)
Figure 4.3.9 shows the current flow during the fourth and fifth transitions. At the beginning 
of the fourth transition, Q1 turns “off” instantly under zero-voltage conditions because node 
FIG. 4.3.9 Shows the fourth transition, where Q1 turns “off” under ZVS conditions 
because the voltage at node “D” is 300 volts. Current continues to flow left to right 
via P1, L
1e
, and R
1e
as shown, discharging C1 and C3, and taking node “D” towards 
zero volts. 
At transition 5, D3 conducts, the voltage at node “D” is clamped to near zero and 
as previously described, the current in C1 goes to zero. At this point Q3 can turn “on” 
under ZVS conditions during the period that D3 is conducting.
Now node “B” is at 300 volts, node “D” is at zero, and the full supply voltage 
appears across P1, L
1e
, and R
1e
. At transition 6, Q3 turns “on,” the current will rapidly 
reverse, and the current flow shown in Fig. 4.3.10 will be established.
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.99
“D” and node “A” are both at 300 volts. This breaks the top “flywheel current loop.” In a 
way similar to the first transition described above, capacitors C1 and C3 (which are con-
nected to node “D”) now discharge such that the voltage at node “D” moves towards zero.
3.7.7 Fifth Transition (D3 Conducts)
When node “D” reaches zero, diode D3 will be brought into conduction, clamping node 
“D” to the negative supply line, node “C.”
3.7.8 Sixth Transition (Q3 “on”)
Figure 4.3.10 shows, in a way similar to what was described above, that during the D3 
clamping action, Q3 can be turned “on” under zero-voltage conditions. Since the voltage 
across the primary winding P1 and L
1e
is now the full supply voltage, the current in L
1e
and P1 will quickly fall to zero and reverse, and the current flow conditions shown in 
Fig. 4.3.10 will be established very rapidly. Since the voltage across P1 is now the full 
supply voltage, energy will again be transferred to the secondary during the period when 
Q3 and Q2 are conducting, but notice the polarity of the voltage into the secondary bridge 
rectifiers is now reversed.
FIG. 4.3.10 Shows the sixth transition with Q3 turned “on.” The current has reversed 
and flows right to left via Q2, R
1e
,L
1e
,P1, and Q3 as shown. The voltage across P1
has reversed, and the full supply voltage is applied. Power is again being delivered 
to the output. This is the second “on” period and is maintained for the required “on” 
period.
4.100
PART 4
3.7.9 Seventh Transition (Q2 “Off”)
After the power transfer period, Q2 turns “off.” Figure 4.3.11 shows that in this transition, 
Q2 turns “off” instantly under zero-voltage conditions as node “B” and node “A” are at 
300 volts. Current will now flow out of node “B” and its voltage will be pulled down to the 
common rail as C2 and C4 discharge.
FIG. 4.3.11 Shows the seventh and eighth transitions. In the seventh transition Q2 turns “off”
under ZVS, because node “B” is at 300 volts. Current continues in L
1e
from right to left as 
shown, and capacitors C2 and C4 discharge, taking node “B” towards zero.
At the eighth transition, D4 conducts clamping node “B” to zero. The voltage across P1 is 
near zero and power is not transferred to the output. This is the second “off” period.
The lower flywheel loop current is now established as shown, and will continue throughout 
the “off” period with only a slight reduction.
3.7.10 Eighth Transition (D4 Conducts)
When the voltage on node “B” reaches zero, diode D4 will conduct, and the lower flywheel 
current loop Q4, R
1e
,L
1e
,P1, and Q3 will now be established.
3.7.11 Ninth Transition (Q4 “On”)
Figure 4.3.12 shows that Q4 turns “on” under zero-voltage conditions during the time that 
D4 is conducting, and the lower flywheel loop current will be maintained.
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.101
As described previously, this flywheel current will continue conducting during this 
“off” (non-active) period of the bridge. Since the voltage across the transformer primary 
P1 is now zero again, energy will not be transferred to the output during this period.
3.7.12 Tenth Transition (Q3 “Off”)
Figure 4.3.13 shows that in this transition Q3 turns “off” instantly under nearly zero-
voltage conditions, since node “D” and node “C” are at zero volts. Node “D” is now pulled 
towards 300 V, charging C1 and C3.
3.7.13 Eleventh Transition (D1 Conducts)
When node “D” reaches 300 volts, diode D1 conducts and node “D” is clamped to the 300 volt 
supply line.
3.7.14 Twelfth Transition (Q1 “On”)
During the D1 clamping period, Q1 will be turned “on” under zero-voltage conditions.
FIG. 4.3.12 Shows the ninth transition, where Q4 turns “on” under ZVS conditions 
because D4 is conducting. The lower loop current transfers from D4 to Q4, and the lower 
loop current continues with little change.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested