c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf online software SDK cloud windows winforms web page class Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi8-part552

1.48
PART 1
much as 1% of the rated output power, depending on the size of the air gap and the power 
rating of the unit. For applications in which the air gap is in the center pole only, there will 
be little further increase in power loss from fitting a screen. However, the overall trans-
former efficiency is about the same in both cases, as the center pole gap increases the losses 
in the transformer windings by about the same amount. 
It would seem that effective magnetic screening of a transformer can be applied only 
at the expense of additional power losses. Consequently, such screening should be used 
only where essential. In many cases, the power supply or host equipment will have a metal 
enclosure so that EMI requirements will be met without the need for extra transformer 
screening. When open-frame switching units are used in video display terminals, screen-
ing of the transformer will usually be required to prevent interference with the display by 
magnetic coupling to the CRT beam. The additional heat generated by the outer copper 
screen may be conducted away using a heat sink or a thermal shunt from the screen to the 
chassis. Figure 1.4.5 shows a typical example of a copper EMI screen as applied to an 
E core transformer with air gaps in the outer legs.
4.6 PROBLEMS
1. Why are Faraday screens so effective in reducing common-mode interference in high-
voltage switching devices and transformers? 
2. What is a line impedance stabilization network (LISN)? 
3. What is the difference between common-mode and series-mode line filter inductors? 
4. What is the difference between a Faraday screen and a safety screen in a switching 
transformer?
Delete pages pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf files; delete a page from a pdf file
Delete pages pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf online; delete pdf pages acrobat
1.49
FUSE SELECTION 
5.1 INTRODUCTION
Fuses (fusible wire links) are one of the oldest and most universally used overload protec-
tion methods. However, the fuse sometimes does not get the close attention it deserves for 
a thorough understanding of its characteristics. 
Modern fuse technology is an advanced science; new and better fuses are continually 
being developed to meet the more demanding requirements for protection of semiconduc-
tor circuitry. To obtain the most reliable long-term performance and best protection, a fuse 
must be knowledgeably chosen to suit the application. 
5.2 FUSE PARAMETERS 
From an electrical standpoint, fuses are categorized by three major parameters: current rat-
ing, voltage rating, and most important, “let-through” current, or I2t rating. 
Current Rating 
It is common knowledge that a fuse has a current rating and that this must exceed the maxi-
mum DC or rms current demanded by the protected circuit. However, there are two other 
ratings that are equally important for the selection of the correct fuse. 
Voltage Rating 
The voltage rating of a fuse is not necessarily linked to the supply voltage. Rather, the fuse 
voltage rating is an indication of the fuse’s ability to extinguish the arc that is generated as 
the fuse element melts under fault conditions. The voltage across the fuse element under 
these conditions depends on the supply voltage and the type of circuit. For example, a fuse 
in series with an inductive circuit may see voltages several times greater than the supply 
voltage during the clearance transient. 
Failure to select a fuse of appropriate voltage rating may result in excessive arcing 
during a fault, which will increase the “let-through” energy during the fuse clearance. In 
particularly severe circumstances, the fuse cartridge may explode, causing a fire hazard. 
Special methods of arc extinction are utilized in high-voltage fuses. These include sand 
filling and spring-loaded fuse elements.
CHAPTER 5 
1.49
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page pdf online; delete page in pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf reader
1.50
PART 1
“Let-Through” Current (I2t Rating) 
This characteristic of the fuse is defined by the amount of energy that must be absorbed 
by the fuse element to cause it to melt. This is sometimes referred to as the pre-arcing 
let-through current. To melt the fuse element, heat energy must be absorbed by the ele-
ment more rapidly than it can be conducted away. This requires a defined current and time 
product.
For very short time periods (less than 10 ms), very little heat is conducted away from 
the fuse element, and the amount of energy necessary to melt the fuse is a function of the 
fuse element’s specific heat, its mass, and type of alloy used. The heat energy absorbed by 
the fuse element has units of watt-seconds (joules), and is calculated as I2Rt for a particular 
fuse. As the fuse resistance is a constant, this is proportional to I2t, normally referred to as 
the I2t rating for a particular fuse or the pre-arcing energy. 
For longer periods, the energy required to melt the fuse element will vary according to 
the element material and the thermal conduction properties of the surrounding filler and 
fuse housing. 
In higher-voltage circuits, an arc will be struck after the fuse element has melted and a 
further amount of energy will be passed to the output circuit while this arc is maintained. 
The magnitude of this additional energy is dependent on the applied voltage, the character-
istic of the circuit, and the design of the fuse element. Consequently, this parameter is not 
a function of the fuse alone and will vary with the application.
The I2t rating categorizes fuses into the more familiar “slow-blow”, normal, and 
“fast-blow” types. Figure 1.5.1 shows the shape of a typical pre-arcing current/time let-
through characteristic for each of the three types. The curve roughly follows an I2t law for 
periods of less than 10 ms. The addition of various moderators within the fuse package 
can greatly modify the shape of this clearance characteristic. It should be noted that the I2t
energy (and hence the energy let-through to the protected equipment) can be as much as 
two decades greater in a slow-blow fuse of the same DC current rating! For example, the I2t
rating can range from 5 A2s for a 10-A fast fuse to 3000 A2s for a 10-A slow fuse. 
FIG. 1.5.1 Typical fuse I2t ratings and pre-arcing fuse clearance times for fast, normal, and slow fuse 
links. (Courtesy Littelfuse Inc.)
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete page pdf
5. FUSE SELECTION
1.51
The total let-through energy of the fuse (pre-arcing plus arcing) also varies enormously. 
Further, it depends on the fusible link material, construction of the fusible element, applied 
voltage, type of fault, and other circuit-linked parameters. 
5.3 TYPES OF FUSES 
Time-Delay Fuse (Slow-Blow)
A time-delay fuse will have a relatively massive fuse element, usually of low-melting-point 
alloy. As a result, these fuses can provide large currents for relatively long periods without 
rupture. They are widely used for circuits with large inrush currents, such as motors, sole-
noids, and transformers. 
Standard-Blow Fuse
These fuses are low-cost and generally of more conventional construction, using copper 
elements, often in clear glass enclosures. They can handle short-term high-current tran-
sients, and because of their low cost, they are widely used. Very often the size is selected 
for short-circuit protection only. 
Very Fast Acting Fuses (HRC, or High Rupture Capacity, 
Semiconductor Fuses)
These fuses are intended for the protection of semiconductor devices. As such, they are 
required to give the minimum let-through energy during an overload condition. Fuse ele-
ments will have little mass and will often be surrounded by some form of filler. The purpose 
of the filler is to conduct heat away from the fuse element during long-term current stress 
to provide good long-term reliability, and to quickly quench the arc when the fuse element 
melts under fault conditions. For short-term high-current transients, the thermal conductiv-
ity of the filler is relatively poor. This allows the fuse element to reach melting temperature 
rapidly, with the minimum energy input. Such fuses will clear very rapidly under transient 
current loads. 
Other important fuse properties, sometimes neglected, are the long-term reliability and 
power loss. Low-cost fast-clearance fuses often rely on a single strand of extremely thin 
wire. This wire is fragile and is often sensitive to mechanical stress and vibration; in any 
event, such fuse elements will deteriorate over the long term, even at currents below the 
rated value. A typical operating life of 1000 h is often quoted for this type of fuse at its 
rated current. 
The more expensive quartz sand-filled fuses will provide much longer life, since the 
heat generated by the thin element is conducted away under normal conditions. Also, the 
mechanical degradation of the fuse element under vibration is not so rapid, as the filling 
gives mechanical support. 
Slow-blow fuses, on the other hand, are generally much more robust and have longer 
working lives at their rated currents. However, these fuses, with their high “let-through” 
energies, will not give very effective protection to sensitive semiconductor circuits. 
This brief description covers only a very few of the ingenious methods that are used in 
modern fuse technology to obtain special characteristics. It serves to illustrate the number 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
add and remove pages from pdf file online; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages of pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
1.52
PART 1
of different properties that fuses can exhibit, and perhaps will draw a little more attention 
to the importance of correct fuse selection and replacement. 
5.4 SELECTING FUSES
Off-Line Switchmode Supplies 
The initial fuse selection for off-line switching supplies should be made as follows: 
For the line input fuse, study the turn-on characteristics of the supply and the action of 
the inrush-limiting circuitry at maximum and minimum input voltages and full current-
limited load. Choose a standard- or slow-blow fuse that provides sufficient current margin 
to give reliable operation and satisfy the inrush requirements. Its continuous current rat-
ing should be low enough to provide good protection in the event of a genuine failure. 
However, for long fuse life, the current rating should not be too close to the maximum 
rms equipment input current measured at minimum input voltage and maximum load 
(perhaps 150% of I
rms
maximum). Note: Use measured or calculated rms currents, and 
allow for the power factor (approximately 0.6 for capacitor input filters) when calculating 
rms currents. 
The voltage rating of the fuse must exceed at least the peak supply voltage. This rating 
is important, as excessive arcing will take place if the voltage rating is too low. Arcing can 
let through considerable amounts of energy, and may result in explosive rupture of the fuse, 
with a risk of fire in the equipment. 
5.5 SCR CROWBAR FUSES
If SCR-type overvoltage protection is provided, it is often supplemented by a series fuse. 
This fuse should have an I2t rating considerably less (perhaps 60% less) than the SCR I2t
rating, to ensure that the fuse will clear before SCR failure. Of course, a fast-blow fuse 
should be selected in this case. The user should understand that fuses degrade with age, 
and there should be a periodic replacement policy. The failure of a fuse in older equip-
ment is not necessarily an indication that the equipment has developed a fault (other than 
a tired fuse). 
5.6 TRANSFORMER INPUT FUSES 
The selection of fuses for 60-Hz transformer input supplies, such as linear regulator sup-
plies, is not as straightforward as may have been expected. 
Very often inrush limiting is not provided in linear power supply applications, and 
inrush currents can be large. Further, if grain-oriented C cores or similar cores are used, 
there is a possibility of partial core saturation during the first half cycle as a result of mag-
netic memory of the previous operation. These effects must be considered when selecting 
fuses. Slow-blow fuses may be necessary. 
It can be seen from the preceding discussion that the selection of fuse rating and type for 
optimum protection and long life is a task to be carried out with some care. For continued 
optimum protection, the user must ensure that fuses are always replaced by others of the 
same type and rating. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
5. FUSE SELECTION
1.53
5.7 PROBLEMS
1. Quote the three major selection criteria for supply or output fuses. 
2. Why is the voltage rating of a fuse so important? 
3. Under what conditions may the fuse voltage rating exceed the supply voltage? 
4. Why is the I2t rating of a fuse an important selection criterion? 
5. Why is it important to replace a fuse with another of the same type and rating? 
This page intentionally left blank 
1.55
LINE RECTIFICATION AND 
CAPACITOR INPUT FILTERS 
FOR “DIRECT-OFF-LINE” 
SWITCHMODE POWER 
SUPPLIES 
6.1 INTRODUCTION
As previously mentioned, the “direct-off-line” switchmode supply is so called because it 
takes its power input directly from the ac power lines, without using the rather large low-
frequency (50–60 Hz) isolation transformer normally found in linear power supplies. 
In the switchmode system, the input-to-output galvanic isolation is provided by a much 
smaller high-frequency transformer, driven by a semiconductor inverter circuit so as to 
provide some form of DC-to-DC conversion. To provide a DC input to the converter, it 
is normal practice to rectify and smooth the 50/60-Hz ac supply, using semiconductor 
power rectifiers and large electrolytic capacitors. (Exceptions to this would be special low-
distortion systems, in which input boost regulators are used to improve the power factor. 
These special systems will not be considered here.)
For dual input voltage operation (nominally 120/240 V ac), it is common practice to 
use a full-bridge rectifier for the high-input-voltage conditions, and various link arrange-
ments to obtain voltage doubler action for the low-input-voltage conditions. Using this 
approach, the high-frequency DC-to-DC converter can be designed for a nominal DC input 
of approximately 310 V for both input voltages. 
An important aspect of the system design is the correct sizing of input inductors, recti-
fier current ratings, input switch ratings, filter component size, and input fuse ratings. To 
size these components correctly, a full knowledge of the relevant applied stress is required. 
For example, to size the rectifier diodes, input fuses, and filter inductors correctly, the 
values of peak and rms input currents will be required, while the correct sizing of reservoir 
and/or filter capacitors requires the effective rms capacitor current. However, these stress 
values are in turn a function of source resistance, loading, and actual component values.
A rigorous mathematical analysis of the input rectifier and filter is possible, but tedious.83
Further, previous graphical methods26 assume a fixed load resistance with an exponential capac-
itor discharge. In power supply applications, the load applied to the capacitor input filter is the 
input loading of the regulated DC-to-DC converter section. This is a constant-power load in the 
case of a switching regulator, or a constant-current load in the case of a linear regulator. Hence, 
this previous work is not directly applicable except where ripple voltages are relatively small. 
CHAPTER 6 
1.55
1.56
PART 1
Note: A constant-power load takes an increasing current as the input voltage falls, the 
reverse of a resistive load. 
To meet this sizing need, a number of graphs have been empirically developed from actual 
system measurements. These will assist the designer in the initial component selection. 
6.2 TYPICAL DUAL-VOLTAGE CAPACITOR 
INPUT FILTER CIRCUIT 
Figure 1.6.1 shows a typical dual-voltage rectifier capacitor input filter circuit. A link 
option LK1 is provided, which allows the rectifier capacitor circuit to be configured as a 
voltage doubler for 120-V operation or as a bridge rectifier for 240-V operation. The basic 
rectifier capacitor input filter and energy storage circuit (C5, C6, and D1 through D4) has 
been supplemented with an input fuse, an inrush-limiting thermistor NTC1, and a high-
frequency noise filter (L1, L2, L3, C1, C2, C3, and C4). 
FIG. 1.6.1 Example of a direct-off-line, link-selected dual-voltage, capacitive input 
filter and rectifier circuit, with additional high-frequency conducted-mode input filter.
For 240-V operation, the link LK1 will not be fitted, and diodes D1 through D4 act as 
a full-bridge rectifier. This will provide approximately 310 V DC to the constant-power 
DC-to-DC converter load. Low-frequency smoothing is provided by capacitors C5 and C6, 
which act in series across the load. 
For 120-V operation, the link LK1 is fitted, connecting diodes D3 and D4 in parallel 
with C5 and C6. Since these diodes now remain reverse-biased throughout the cycle, they 
are no longer active. However, during a positive half cycle, D1 conducts to charge C5 (top 
positive), and during a negative half cycle, D2 conducts to charge C6 (bottom negative). 
Since C5 and C6 are in series when the diodes are off, the output voltage is the sum of the 
two capacitor voltages, giving the required voltage doubling. (In this configuration, the 
voltage doubler can be considered as two half-wave rectifier circuits in series, with alter-
nate half cycle charging for the reservoir capacitors.) 
6.3 EFFECTIVE SERIES RESISTANCE R
S
The effective series resistance R
s
is made up of all the various series components, including 
the prime power source resistance, which appear between the prime power source voltage 
and the reservoir capacitors C5 and C6. To simplify the analysis, the various resistances are 
lumped into a single effective resistance R
s
. To further reduce peak currents, additional series 
resistance may be added to provide a final optimum effective series resistance. It will be 
6. LINE RECTIFICATION AND CAPACITOR INPUT FILTERS
1.57
shown that the performance of the rectifier capacitor input filter and energy storage circuit is 
very much dependent on this final optimum effective series resistance. 
A simplified version of the bridge circuit is shown in Fig. 1.6.2. In this simplified circuit, 
the series reservoir capacitors C5 and C6 are replaced by their equivalent capacitance C
e
,
and the effective series resistance R
s
has been positioned on the output side of the bridge 
rectifier to further ease the analysis. 
In the example shown in Fig. 1.6.2, the effective series resistance R
s
is made up as 
follows: 
The prime source resistance R
s
` is the resistance of the power supply line itself. Its value 
will depend on the location of the supply, the size of utility transformer, and the distance 
from the service entrance. Values between 20 and 600 m7 have been found in typical 
industrial and office locations. Although this may appear to be quite low, it can still have a 
significant effect in large power systems. In any event, the value of the source resistance is 
generally outside the control of the power supply designer, and at least this range must be 
accommodated by any practical supply design. 
A second and usually larger series resistance component is usually introduced by the 
input fuse, filter inductors, rectifier diodes, and inrush-limiting devices. In the 100-W 
example shown in Fig. 1.6.1, the inrush-limiting thermistor NTC1 is the major contributor, 
with a typical “hot resistance” of 1 7. In higher-power supplies, the inrush-limiting resistor 
or thermistor will often be shorted out by a triac or SCR after initial start-up, to reduce the 
source resistance and power loss. 
6.4 CONSTANT-POWER LOAD
By design, the switchmode power supply will maintain its output voltage constant for a 
wide range of input voltages. Since the output voltage is fixed, under steady loading con-
ditions, the output power remains constant as the input voltage changes. Hence, since the 
converter efficiency also remains nearly constant, so does the converter input power. 
In order to maintain constant input power as the input voltage to the converter falls, the 
input current must rise. Thus the voltage discharge characteristic VC
e
of the storage capacitor 
C
e
is like a reverse exponential, the voltage starting at its maximum initial value V
i
after a 
diode conduction period.
FIG. 1.6.2 Simplified capacitive input filter circuit, with full-wave 
bridge rectifier and lumped total effective source resistance R
s
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested