c# pdf reader table : Delete pages pdf online Library control class asp.net azure html ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi81-part554

This page intentionally left blank 
Delete pages pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf online; delete page in pdf document
Delete pages pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pdf pages; delete page on pdf document
4.133
A SINGLE CONTROL 
WIDE RANGE SINE WAVE 
OSCILLATOR
5.1 INTRODUCTION
A wide range sine wave oscillator, based on the well known Wien Bridge oscillator, is pre-
sented in this chapter. The amplitude is inherently stable and the frequency can be adjusted 
over a wide range with a single control voltage in the zero to five volt range, making it 
very suitable for advanced digital control systems, for example by a PWM signal from a 
microcontroller. The Wien Bridge circuit enjoys continued popularity, in part because of 
its superior frequency stability.
For reference, a basic Wien Bridge oscillator is shown in Fig. 4.5.1, with key nodes and 
component designations labeled. These correspond to the same nodes and designations in 
the new voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) circuit shown in Fig. 4.5.3. In normal opera-
tion the frequency of the basic oscillator is changed by adjusting both R
X
and R
Y
using 
a dual potentiometer, and the amplifier gain is kept at the correct value for undistorted 
oscillation by controlling the ratio of R
F
to R
G
.
5.2 FREQUENCY AND AMPLITUDE 
CONTROL THEORY
Frequency and amplitude relationships in the Wien Bridge shown in Fig. 4.5.1 are determined 
as follows. Let the two resistors R
X
and R
Y
be equal toR, and the two capacitors C1 and C2 be 
equal to C. Then it has been shown93 that the frequency of oscillation is given by
f 1/(2PRC).
For stable oscillation the gain of the positive feedback network must be 1/3, and the gain of 
the Wien Bridge amplifier must be 3, to provide a total positive loop gain of exactly unity. 
Therefore R
F
 2R
G
. For steady state operation, the relationships among the sine voltages 
at nodes A, C, and D are given by
A/3  C  D
and these voltages will all be in phase.
CHAPTER 5
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf preview; delete page from pdf file online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages pdf file
4.134
PART 4
In Fig. 4.5.2, op-amp A1 is the Wien Bridge amplifier, whose negative feedback loop 
consists of R1, P1, and R2. The closed loop gain of this amplifier can be adjusted with
P1 between 3 and 4.25 with the values shown, and the gain can thus be increased above 
3 as necessary to accommodate deviations from ideal circuit behavior caused by voltage 
losses, phase shifts, or imbalances, due to component tolerances and offset currents. 
Because the transconductance of an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) is 
increasingly non-linear with input voltage amplitude, the circuit has natural amplitude 
stabilization to within 10% over a wide frequency range, and in this example no extra 
circuitry is provided for gain stabilization.
FIG 4.5.1 Basic Wien Bridge oscillator, with 
nodes and designations for reference.
FIG. 4.5.2 Wide range voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), with nodes and designations 
corresponding to Fig. 4.5.1.
In Fig. 4.5.1, the ratio of R
F
to R
G
controls the gain, which is stabilized traditionally by 
making R
F
or R
G
a nonlinear element such as a thermistor or barretter. Alternatively the 
gain can be monitored and controlled by a separate closed loop feedback system, typically 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete page on pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
cut pages from pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
5. A SINGLE CONTROL WIDE RANGE SINE WAVE OSCILLATOR
4.135
implemented with a JFET as the variable resistance element. Both of these methods impose 
a limit on the minimum frequency of oscillation, because below this limit the period of 
oscillation becomes significant compared to the time constant of the element or control 
circuit, and control of amplitude is lost.
If it is desired to sweep the frequency under electronic control, the rate of sweep is 
limited by the same problem. It is necessary to limit the sweep rate so that the amplitude 
control has time to adjust to the changing operating conditions.
However, in Fig. 4.5.2, because amplitude in this circuit is stabilized by a method that is 
not time dependent, the lower limit of frequency and the sweep rate are not constrained.
Beyond this the theory of the Wien Bridge sine wave oscillator will not be discussed in 
more detail here, since these topics are well covered in the reference literature.93
5.3 OPERATING THEORY FOR THE WIDE RANGE 
SINE WAVE VCO
In the new design, the resistors R
X
and R
Y
are replaced by voltage controlled resistors 
(VCRs), the amplitude is set by a potentiometer P1, and the loop gain is maintained at 
unity by the inherent variable gain characteristic of the amplifiers.
Figure 4.5.2 shows the new VCO circuit. The resistors (R
X
and R
Y
) of the frequency 
control loop in the basic Wien Bridge circuit shown in Fig. 4.5.1 are replaced by opera-
tional transconductance amplifiers (OTAs) A5 and A6, configured as VCRs.
The action of the VCR is best understood with reference to Fig. 4.5.3. The details of 
OTA operation are given in more detail in the manufacturers’ application notes.94 Note that 
one end of the simulated resistor R
X
appears at the OTA output, and the current that flows 
in R
X
is equal to V
X
/R
X
. The other end of R
X
is not directly accessible at the input to the 
VCR, but the effective value of R
X
as set by the amplifier bias current (I
ABC
) responds to
V
X
. The formula for the effective resistance of the OTA (R
X
) is given as
R
X
 (R  R
A
)/g
m
R
A
FIG. 4.5.3 Voltage controlled resistor 
(VCR), implemented with OTA as con-
figured in the VCO. Note that V
X
is the 
voltage across R
X
.
Since the transconductance of the OTAs (in Fig. 4.5.2) is controlled by I
ABC
from Q1 
and Q2, the VCRs and thus the oscillation frequency can be continuously adjusted with 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from pdf in preview; copy pages from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages from pdf online; delete page numbers in pdf
4.136
PART 4
a single 0 5V control voltage V
C
. The matched transistors Q1 and Q2 are 0 1 mA cur-
rent sources, controlled by the op-amp A4. The amplifier forces the Q1 emitter voltage 
to zero, so the voltage across R9 is V
C
. Since the base current is negligible, Q1 collector 
current, which is I
ABC
to A6, is V
C
/R9. The bias current I
ABC
is thus V
C
/5 k, and since V
C
is 
between 0 5 V, I
ABC
is 0 1 mA. Because Q1 and Q2 are matched, the emitter voltages are 
very close to equal, so I
ABC
to A5 is also 0 1 mA. Thus a positive voltage in the range 
zero to five volts at the input V
C
can change the frequency over about 5½ decades without 
changing the C1, C2 capacitor value. 
The circuit is powered with split o12 V supplies, and except for some negligible offsets, 
all amplifier DC input and output voltages are zero except the output of A4. The output 
voltage at V
OUT
can be several volts p-p, but distortion increases rapidly with amplitudes 
above about 6 V
PP
.
Amplifiers A5 and A6 in Fig. 4.5.3 are LM13700 OTAs, (or similar) which produce an 
output current that is proportional to the differential input voltage on a continuous basis. 
The output current is also proportional to the amplifier bias current I
ABC
, and the transcon-
ductance of the OTA is in turn dependent on I
ABC
, which is given in the applications infor-
mation as g
m
 19.2 I
ABC
. The two OTAs are configured as two VCRs that correspond to 
the resistors R
X
and R
Y
in the positive feedback network of Fig. 4.5.1.
A capacitor can be connected in series or in parallel with a VCR. In the top part of the 
positive feedback network the VCR (Rx), and C1 are in series, and the voltage applied to 
the input end of the VCR (R
X
) at “A” is the output of the Wien Bridge amp. The output 
end of the VCR (R
X
) is connected to C1 at “B.” For the parallel connected R
Y
and C2, the 
input of R
Y
is connected to the bottom of C2 at the common node. Thus the input resistor 
has simply been left out. The output end of the lower VCR (R
Y
) is connected to C1 and 
C2 at node “C,” as shown.
To find the oscillation frequency under steady state conditions, the resistance of the 
VCRs (R
X
and R
y
) can be calculated (using the component values for A5, in Fig. 4.5.2) for 
a midrange value of I
ABC
of 250 μA as follows:
g
m
 19.2 I
ABC
 19.2(250 μ)  4.8 mS
Then
R
X
 (R6   R5)/g
m
R5  (10 k   100)/(4.8 m)(100)  21 k.
A similar discussion for A6 yields R
Y
 21 k, since R
X
and R
Y
are chosen to be equal in the 
two VCRs. With C1  C2  47 pF, the frequency is
f 1/(2PRC)  1/(2P 21 k 47 p)  161 kHz.
To see the relationship between oscillation frequency and V
C
, note that frequency is 
inversely proportional to R
X
(as shown in the formula above and in Fig. 4.5.2) and R
X
is 
inversely proportional to g
m
, which is in turn proportional to I
ABC
. Finally as discussed 
above, I
ABC
is also controlled by V
C
. Since frequency is linearly dependant on the control 
voltage V
C
it can be adjusted manually or automatically from any source, such as a PWM 
signal from a microcontroller.
The output voltages B and C that appear at the outputs of A5 and A6 are followed by 
two LF412 FET-input op-amps A2 and A3 (os similar), which are configured as unity 
gain, high impedance buffers. By presenting very high input impedance of about 1012 7
to the OTA outputs, the output currents of the OTAs are thus forced to flow only in the 
two capacitors C1 and C2. The voltage at the output of A2 is the same as B, and that of A3 
is the same as C. Although the circuit could be configured using the integral Darlington 
transistor buffers included in the OTA package, the FET-input buffers used in this example 
give better performance, and considerably increase the dynamic range of the circuit.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from a pdf file; delete page from pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete a page from a pdf; best pdf editor delete pages
5. A SINGLE CONTROL WIDE RANGE SINE WAVE OSCILLATOR
4.137
5.4 CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
The total harmonic distortion (THD) was measured, and was found to be less than 1% 
over the frequency range from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, with 470 pF capacitors. The amplitude 
stability under these conditions was within 10% without changing the gain control P1. 
The dynamic range of the oscillator with fixed capacitors covers about 5½ decades, but 
requires changing the gain to control amplitude. The maximum output amplitude for less 
than 1% THD is about 6 V
PP
.
To keep distortion within 1%, the maximum practical frequency for this VCO is 300 kHz, 
with 47 pF for C1 and C2. To increase the maximum frequency would require increasing 
the differential voltage between the OTA inputs in order to get more output current, and 
this would cause unacceptable distortion, which increases with this differential voltage.
Because amplitude is not dependant on an extra stabilization circuit with a fixed time 
constant, the minimum frequency is virtually unlimited, and is set by the choice of C1 
and C2. 
This page intentionally left blank 
G.1
SUPPLY TERMS
Power supplies, and switchmode power supplies in particular, are the product of a relatively 
new and rapidly developing engineering discipline. As such, many of the specialized terms 
used to describe them are still developing, and have yet to become generally recognized and 
fully defined.
The following list, although by no means comprehensive, gives some of the more generally 
recognized terms, together with the author’s definitions, based on generally accepted industry 
usage at the time of printing. In some cases, the general meaning of a term may differ from its 
specific definition as applied to power supplies. In such cases, the “general meaning” (GM) is 
given first, followed by the “power supply specific definition” (PSS).
International standards and definitions for power supplies are yet to come, and may in due 
course change some of the examples given here.
Ambient Temperature. GM: Environmental temperature
PSS: For convection-cooled supplies, the temperature of the air directly below the supply in a free flow 
position. For fan-cooled supplies, the air temperature at the fan inlet. For conduction-cooled units, the 
temperature of the heat exchanger interface.
Amplifier, Differential. An amplifier with two input signal ports whose output voltage amplitude and 
polarity are proportional to the voltage difference and polarity between the voltages applied to the invert-
ing and noninverting input ports.
Amplifier, Transconductance. An amplifier with two input signal ports whose output current is propor-
tional to the difference between the voltages applied to the input ports.
Ancillary Functions. All functions provided in a power supply which are not directly connected with the 
generation of stabilized outputs. In MTBF calculations, ancillary functions are sometimes disregarded in 
the calculation if a failure of an ancillary function is not to be considered a critical failure.
Automatic Crossover. PSS: This term is normally reserved for laboratory-grade variable power supplies 
which have both a constant-voltage and a constant-current characteristic. Such supplies have the ability for 
“automatic crossover” between the two operating modes in response to load variations or adjustment of the 
supply controls. The mode of operation is normally indicated by a front panel indicator light.
Auxiliary Outputs. All outputs of a multiple supply other than the main output. Auxiliary outputs usually 
have a lower power rating and limited performance.
Bandwidth. GM: This describes a system’s frequency response, normally the difference in frequency between 
the upper and lower “half power” or 3-dB-down frequencies. PSS: When applied to power supplies, this 
normally refers to the frequency band over which output ripple and noise components are to be measured or 
specified.
Biphase Rectifier. A circuit which rectifies both half cycles of an ac input, utilizing a transformer with a 
center-tapped winding.
Bleeder Resistor. A resistor whose main purpose is to provide loading. It may be provided to discharge 
capacitors for safety reasons, or to preload output lines in switchmode power supplies, to prevent an exces-
sive voltage rise when the external load is removed. Also called “dummy load” or “preloading resistor.”
Bridge. GM: A circuit configuration, normally used for precision measurement, in which two potential 
dividers (resistive and/or reactive) are brought to balance to compare an unknown reactance with a pre-
cisely known value.
PSS: In power supplies, a bridge-type circuit configuration normally refers to the method of connecting 
switching devices, in bridge or half-bridge arrangements, for converter applications. Also, a method of 
connecting diodes to provide full-wave rectification from single-phase inputs.
Brownout. GM: A drop in supply voltage to a value below the minimum normally specified by the supply 
authority, but above zero.
GLOSSARY OF POWER 
G.1
G.2
GLOSSARY
Brownout Detection. PSS: Used with reference to the power failure warning circuit. It describes a warning 
circuit capable of recognizing the critical supply voltage at which an “impending failure” warning must 
be given, to ensure a specified “hold-up time” at full load. The critical voltage will normally be in the 
“brownout zone.”
Brownout Zone. PSS: Normally defined as a voltage between the lowest value specified for full operation 
and the lowest value at which the power supply will continue to operate. The power supply is not normally 
expected to meet full specifications in the brownout zone.
Bus. GM: With reference to IEEE. – 488, this refers to the interconnecting control lines.
PSS: For a power supply, it is any interconnection used to control or communicate with a power supply or 
between supplies—for example, between P terminals used for forced current sharing, or in master-slave 
applications; also, remote programming and shutdown.
Busbar. GM: A heavy copper bar, used for interconnections of high current capability. Very often, a busbar 
will not be insulated and provides multiple load connections.
Carryover. PSS: Describes the ability of a switchmode power supply to continue to provide regulated 
outputs during a short input failure as a result of the energy stored in the supply (normally in the input 
capacitors). Also see “holdup time.”
Centering. PSS: A term normally reserved for multiple-output supplies. It describes the unavoidable devia-
tion from nominal output voltage of auxiliary and semiregulated outputs as a result of design or manu-
facturing limitations. (Usually an effect caused by the need for the number of transformer turns to be a 
complete integer.)
Also, the action of adjustment of an output voltage to bring it to the center of a specified range.
Choke. An inductor specifically designed to carry a large DC current component. (To prevent saturation, 
chokes will often have gapped cores or cores of especially low permeability material.)
Choke, Nonlinear. A choke specifically designed to have a very nonlinear characteristic. A nonlinear choke 
will normally have high inductance when the DC current is low, and a reasonably constant, but low, inductance 
when the DC current is in the middle to upper end of the current range. (This nonlinearity is often induced by 
stepped air gaps in the core, or by using compound cores of different permeability materials.)
Often used to extend the lower end of the range of continuous operation in wide-range switchmode regulators.
Choke, Polarized. A choke whose core has been magnetically prebiased toward one end of the B/H char-
acteristic. (Because a larger flux excursion is now available in the reverse direction, a choke of this nature 
can withstand a larger DC current component.) Magnetically “hard” (rare earth) magnets, positioned in 
the core gap, are normally used for the magnetic prebiasing.
Chokes, RFI. Chokes which are specifically designed to have a high self-resonant frequency, so as to 
provide maximum impedance at RF frequencies. Various space winding or wave winding techniques are 
used to minimize interwinding capacitance.
Choke, Swinging. A choke whose inductance is designed to increase significantly as the DC current is 
reduced toward zero. The swinging choke has a more linear characteristic than the “nonlinear choke,” the 
change in permeability being a function of the properties of the bulk core material.
Common-Mode Ripple and Noise. The components of ripple and noise voltages or currents, which exist 
between input or output lines and a defined ground plane.
Compliance Current. PSS: A little-used term that describes the range of current (and hence resistance) 
over which a constant- (stabilized) voltage power supply will maintain a constant voltage. More common 
terms are “maximum current” or “current limit value.” These terms assume a compliance current range 
from zero or 10% to the limit value.
Compliance Voltage. PSS: A term, normally reserved for constant-current supplies, describing the range of 
load developed voltages (and hence load resistance) over which the power supply is capable of maintaining 
constant current.
Complimentary Tracking. The interconnection of two supplies in such a way that the output voltage ampli-
tude of one supply will follow (track) the output voltage of the other, but will be of opposite polarity.
Conditional Stability. PSS: An undesirable condition of quasi-stability in which the phase shift exceeds 
180° at frequencies below crossover. (In conditionally stable power supplies, large-signal instability may 
occur when loads, temperatures, or other parameters are changed.)
Conducted-Mode EMI. That part of the unwanted interference energy that is conducted along the supply 
or output leads. Conducted-mode EMI is limited by national and international standards.
Constant-Current Limit. PSS: A method of overload protection in which the output current remains con-
stant regardless of the load resistance in the protected overload range.
Constant-Current Supply. GM: Any high-impedance current source whose current is essentially constant 
regardless of the load resistance.
PSS: Describes a type of power supply in which the major controlled parameter is the output current. Such 
supplies will maintain the output current constant for a range of load resistance, normally from zero to 
some maximum value defined by the compliance voltage.
GLOSSARY
G.3
Constant-Voltage Supply. PSS: A power source in which the main controlled parameter is the output 
voltage.
Control ICs. PSS: Dedicated integrated circuits used for the control of power supplies, both switchmode 
and linear.
Convection Cooling. PSS: A method of air cooling the power supply which is dependent on the develop-
ment of convection currents in a free air environment.
Converter. PSS: A general term for any switchmode power supply which converts a DC voltage at the input 
to a DC voltage at the output while providing galvanic (often transformer) isolation. Where regulation is 
not provided, the term “DC transformer” is more correctly used. Where input-to-output galvanic isolation 
is not provided, the term “switchmode regulator” is normally used.
Cross-Connected Load. PSS: A load which is connected between a positive and a negative output terminal 
in a bipolar (series) power supply connection, without reference to the common line. Cross-connected 
loads can cause lockout when foldback or reentrant current protection is used.
Crossover. PSS: The ability of a power supply to change its mode of operation between constant current 
and constant voltage in response to a load change or control adjustment.
Cross Regulation. PSS: The regulation effects measured on one output as a result of changes on other 
outputs. (Very often, in multiple-output supplies, the main output is fully regulated, and cross regula-
tion would refer to the output voltage variations on the auxiliary outputs as a result of load changes on 
the main output.)
Crowbar Protection. PSS: A method of overvoltage protection in which the offending output is short-
circuited in the event of an overvoltage stress. (The short-circuiting device will normally be an SCR.)
Current Foldback. PSS: A method of overload protection, sometimes referred to as “reentrant protection,” 
in which the output current is reduced in the overload region as the load resistance moves toward zero. 
This method of protection can give lockout problems and is normally restricted to linear supplies, where 
it is required to prevent excessive dissipation in the regulator element.
Current-Mode Control. PSS: A switchmode power supply control technique in which a fast-acting control 
loop defines the maximum current in the switching element on a pulse-by-pulse basis.
In constant-voltage supplies, the fast current control loop is then adjusted by a slower voltage-control loop to 
provide a constant output voltage. The two control loops thus form a voltage-controlled current source.
This method of control effectively eliminates the output filter inductor from the small-signal model, auto-
matically improving the stability margin and small-signal dynamic performance. It also has the advantage 
of providing fast current limiting.
Cycling. PSS: A recovery mode during which a power supply will repeatedly attempt to restart after or 
during a stress condition (e.g., a short circuit, overload, overvoltage, etc.).
DC Current Transformer. A type of current transformer in which a DC primary current controls the 
pulsating output current. (Very useful for isolated low-loss current limiting in high-current supplies. See 
Sec. 14.8 in Part 3.)
DC Transformer. A square-wave DC-to-DC converter which provides DC transformation and galvanic 
isolation without regulation. DC transformers often use simple self-oscillating push-pull topologies.
Derating. The reduction in some specified operating parameter as a result of some change in another 
parameter. For example, a reduction in a supply power rating as a result of an increase in ambient 
temperature.
Differential-Mode Ripple and Noise. That part of the input or output ripple and noise voltage which exists 
between two supply or output lines with respect to each other. In multiple-output units, the ripple and noise 
voltage between output lines and a common return line.
Direct-Off-Line Switcher. PSS: A switchmode power supply which provides isolated DC outputs from ac 
line inputs without using line frequency transformers.
Drift. A time-related variation in a defined parameter, normally caused by self-heating or aging effects.
Drop-OutVoltage. PSS: The input voltage below which the output can no longer be fully maintained.
Duty Cycle Control. PSS: A method of control in fixed-frequency switchmode supplies in which the “on” 
period of the power switch is adjusted to control the output.
Duty Ratio Control. PSS: A method of control in switchmode power supplies in which the ratio of the 
“on” period to the “off” period of the power switch is controlled to maintain a constant output. (Note: This 
differs from “duty cycle” control in that the total period need not be constant, giving a variable-frequency 
performance.)
Dynamic Load. GM: A load that is varying, an active load.
PSS: An electronic load which can be rapidly changed to test transient response. May also refer to an 
adjustable constant-current electronic load used for test purposes.
Efficiency. Ratio of output power to input power as a percentage. (Note: True power must be used, with 
due allowance for power factor. With capacitive input filters, often used for “off-line” SMPS, the power 
factor will be approximately 0.63.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested