c# pdf reader table : Delete pdf pages control application system web page azure wpf console SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft11-part583

2.3 The digital camera
89
since it only roughly mimics true luminance) that would be comparable to the regular black-
and-white TVsignal, along with two lower frequency chroma channels.
In bothsystems, the Y signal(or more appropriately, theY’ luma signal since itis gamma
compressed) is obtained from
Y
0
601
=0:299R
0
+0:587G
0
+0:114B
0
;
(2.112)
where R’G’B’ is the triplet of gamma-compressed color components. When using the newer
color definitions for HDTV in BT.709, the formula is
Y
0
709
=0:2125R
0
+0:7154G
0
+0:0721B
0
:
(2.113)
TheUVcomponents are derivedfrom scaled versions of (B
0
Y
0
)and (R
0
Y
0
), namely,
U= 0:492111(B
0
Y
0
) and V = 0:877283(R
0
Y
0
);
(2.114)
whereas the IQ components are the UV components rotated through an angle of 33
. In
composite (NTSC and PAL) video, the chroma signals were then low-pass filtered horizon-
tally before being modulated and superimposed on top of the Y’ luma signal. Backward
compatibility was achieved by having older black-and-white TV sets effectively ignore the
high-frequency chroma signal (because of slow electronics) or, at worst, superimposing it as
ahigh-frequencypattern on top of the main signal.
While these conversions were importantin the earlydays of computer vision, when frame
grabbers would directly digitize the composite TV signal, today all digital video and still
image compression standards are based on the newer YCbCr conversion. YCbCr is closely
relatedtoYUV(the C
b
andC
r
signals carry the blueandred color difference signals andhave
more useful mnemonics than UV) but uses different scale factors to fit within the eight-bit
range available with digital signals.
For video, the Y’ signal is re-scaled to fit within the [16:::235] range of values, while
the Cb and Cr signals are scaled to fit within [16:::240] (GomesandVelho1997;Fairchild
2005). Forstillimages, , theJPEGstandardusesthefulleight-bitrangewithnoreserved
values,
2
6
4
Y
0
C
b
C
r
3
7
5
=
2
6
4
0:299
0:587
0:114
0:168736  0:331264
0:5
0:5
0:418688  0:081312
3
7
5
2
6
4
R
0
G
0
B
0
3
7
5
+
2
6
4
0
128
128
3
7
5
; (2.115)
where the R’G’B’ values are the eight-bit gamma-compressed color components (i.e., the
actual RGB values we obtain when we open up or display a JPEG image). For most appli-
cations, this formula is not that important, since your image reading software will directly
Delete pdf pages - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page in a pdf file; delete pages from a pdf online
Delete pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages in pdf
90
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
provide youwith the eight-bit gamma-compressed R’G’B’ values. However, if youare trying
to do careful image deblocking (Exercise3.30), this information may be useful.
Another color spaceyoumay comeacross is hue, saturation, value (HSV), which is a pro-
jectionof the RGB color cube ontoa non-linear chroma angle, a radial saturation percentage,
and a luminance-inspired value. In more detail, value is defined as either the mean or maxi-
mum color value, saturationis defined asscaleddistance from the diagonal, and hueis defined
as the direction arounda color wheel(the exact formulas aredescribedbyHall(1989);Foley,
van Dam, Feiner et al.(1995)).Suchadecompositionisquitenaturalingraphicsapplications
suchas color picking (it approximates the Munsell chart for color description). Figure2.32l–
nshows an HSVrepresentation of a sample color image, where saturation is encoded using a
gray scale (saturated = darker) and hue is depicted as a color.
If you want your computer vision algorithm to only affect the value (luminance) of an
image and not its saturation or hue, a simpler solution is to use either the Y xy (luminance +
chromaticity) coordinates defined in (2.104) or the even simpler color ratios,
r=
R
R+ G + B
; g =
G
R+ G + B
; b =
B
R+ G + B
(2.116)
(Figure2.32e–h). After manipulating the luma (2.112), e.g., throughthe process of histogram
equalization (Section3.1.4), you can multiply each color ratio by the ratio of the new to old
luma to obtain an adjusted RGB triplet.
While all of these color systems may sound confusing, in the end, it often may not mat-
ter that much which one you use. Poynton, in his Color FAQ, http://www.poynton.com/
ColorFAQ.html,notesthattheperceptuallymotivatedL*a*b*systemisqualitativelysimilar
to the gamma-compressed R’G’B’ system we mostly deal with, since both have a fractional
power scaling (which approximates a logarithmic response) between the actual intensity val-
ues and the numbers being manipulated. As in all cases, think carefully about what you are
trying to accomplish before deciding ona technique to use.
24
2.3.3 Compression
The last stage in a camera’s processing pipeline is usually some form of image compression
(unless you are using a lossless compression scheme such as camera RAWor PNG).
All color video and image compression algorithms start by converting the signal into
YCbCr (or some closely related variant), so that theycan compress the luminance signalwith
higher fidelity than the chrominance signal. (Recall that the human visual system has poorer
24
Ifyou are at a loss forquestions at aconference, you can always ask why the speakerdid not usea perceptual
colorspace,such asL*a*b*.Conversely,ifthey did useL*a*b*,you can ask ifthey haveany concreteevidencethat
this works betterthan regularcolors.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf reader; delete pages pdf files
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete pages out of a pdf
2.3 The digital camera
91
(a) RGB
(b) R
(c) G
(d) B
(e) rgb
(f) r
(g) g
(h) b
(i) L*
(j) a*
(k) b*
(l) H
(m) S
(n) V
Figure 2.32 Color space transformations: (a–d) RGB; (e–h) rgb. (i–k) L*a*b*; (l–n) HSV.
Note that the rgb, L*a*b*, and HSV values are all re-scaled to fit the dynamic range of the
printed page.
frequency response to color than to luminance changes.) In video, it is common to subsam-
ple Cb and Cr by a factor of two horizontally; with still images (JPEG), the subsampling
(averaging) occurs both horizontally and vertically.
Once the luminance and chrominance images have been appropriately subsampled and
separated into individual images, they are then passed to a block transform stage. The most
common technique used here is the discrete cosine transform (DCT), which is a real-valued
variant of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) (see Section3.4.3). The DCT is a reasonable
approximationtothe Karhunen–Lo`eve or eigenvalue decomposition of natural image patches,
i.e., the decomposition that simultaneously packs the most energy into the first coefficients
and diagonalizes the joint covariance matrix among the pixels (makes transform coefficients
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
acrobat export pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
92
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 2.33 Image compressed with JPEG at three quality settings. Note how the amount
of block artifact and high-frequency aliasing (“mosquito noise”) increases from left to right.
statistically independent). Both MPEG and JPEG use 8  8 DCT transforms (Wallace1991;
Le Gall1991),althoughnewervariantsusesmaller44blocksoralternativetransformations,
such as wavelets (TaubmanandMarcellin2002) and lapped transforms (Malvar1990,1998,
2000)arenowused.
After transform coding, the coefficient values are quantized into a set of small integer
values that can be coded using a variable bit length scheme such as a Huffman code or an
arithmetic code (Wallace1991). (The DC (lowest frequency) coefficients are also adaptively
predicted from the previous block’s DC values. The term “DC” comes from “direct current”,
i.e., the non-sinusoidal or non-alternating part of a signal.) The step size in the quantization
is the main variable controlled by the quality setting on the JPEGfile (Figure2.33).
With video, it is also usual to perform block-based motion compensation, i.e., to encode
the difference between each block and a predicted set of pixel values obtained from a shifted
block in the previous frame. (The exception is the motion-JPEG scheme used in older DV
camcorders, which is nothing more than a series of individually JPEG compressed image
frames.) While basic MPEG uses 16 16 motion compensation blocks with integer motion
values (LeGall1991), newer standards use adaptively sized block, sub-pixel motions, and
the ability to reference blocks from older frames. In order to recover more gracefully from
failuresandtoallowfor random access to the video stream, predicted P frames areinterleaved
amongindependently coded I frames. (Bi-directional B frames are also sometimes used.)
The quality of a compression algorithm is usually reported using its peak signal-to-noise
ratio (PSNR), which is derived from the average mean square error,
MSE =
1
n
X
x
h
I(x)  
^
I(x)
i
2
;
(2.117)
where I(x) is the original uncompressed image and
^
I(x) is its compressed counterpart, or
equivalently, the root mean square error (RMS error), which is defined as
RMS =
p
MSE:
(2.118)
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages from a pdf document; add and remove pages from a pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete blank page from pdf; delete blank pages in pdf
2.4 Additional reading
93
The PSNR is defined as
PSNR = 10log
10
I
2
max
MSE
=20log
10
I
max
RMS
;
(2.119)
where I
max
is the maximum signal extent, e.g., 255 for eight-bit images.
While this is just a high-level sketch of how image compression works, it is useful to
understand so that the artifacts introduced by such techniques can be compensated for in
various computer vision applications.
2.4 Additional reading
As we mentioned at the beginning of this chapter, it provides but a brief summary of a very
rich anddeep set of topics, traditionally covered in a number of separate fields.
Amore thorough introduction to the geometry of points, lines, planes, and projections
can be found in textbooks on multi-view geometry (HartleyandZisserman2004;Faugeras
and Luong 2001)andcomputergraphics(Foley, van Dam, Feiner et al. 1995; Watt 1995;
OpenGL-ARB 1997).Topicscoveredinmoredepthincludehigher-orderprimitivessuchas
quadrics, conics, and cubics, as well as three-view and multi-view geometry.
The image formation (synthesis) process is traditionally taught as part of a computer
graphics curriculum (Foley,vanDam,Feineretal.1995;Glassner1995;Watt1995;Shirley
2005)butitis alsostudiedinphysics-basedcomputervision(Wolff, Shafer, and Healey
1992a).
The behavior of camera lens systems is studied in optics (M¨oller1988;Hecht2001;Ray
2002).
Some goodbooks oncolor theoryhavebeenwrittenbyHealeyandShafer(1992);Wyszecki
and Stiles(2000); Fairchild(2005),with Livingstone(2008)providingamorefunandinfor-
mal introduction to the topic of color perception. Mark Fairchild’s page of color books and
links
25
lists manyother sources.
Topics relating to sampling and aliasing are covered in textbooks on signal and image
processing (Crane1997;J¨ahne1997;OppenheimandSchafer1996;Oppenheim, Schafer,
andBuck 1999; Pratt 2007; Russ 2007; Burger and Burge 2008; Gonzales and Woods 2008).
2.5 Exercises
Anote to students: This chapter is relatively light on exercises since it contains mostly
background material and not that many usable techniques. If you really want to understand
25
http://www.cis.rit.edu/fairchild/WhyIsColor/books
links.html.
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
add remove pages from pdf; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages out of a pdf file
94
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
multi-view geometryina thoroughway, I encourage youtoread anddotheexercises provided
byHartleyandZisserman(2004). Similarly, if you want some exercises related to the image
formation process, Glassner’s (1995) bookis full of challenging problems.
Ex 2.1: Least squares intersection point and line fitting—advanced Equation(2.4) shows
how the intersection of two 2D lines can be expressed as their cross product, assuming the
lines are expressed as homogeneous coordinates.
1. If youare given more than two lines and wantto find a point ~x that minimizes the sum
of squared distances to each line,
D=
X
i
(~x 
~
l
i
)
2
;
(2.120)
how can you compute this quantity? (Hint: Write the dot product as ~x
T
~
l
i
and turn the
squared quantity into a quadratic form, ~x
T
A~x.)
2. To fit a line to a bunch of points, you can compute the centroid (mean) of the points
as well as the covariance matrix of the points around this mean. Show that the line
passing through the centroid along the major axis of the covariance ellipsoid (largest
eigenvector) minimizes the sum of squared distances to the points.
3. These two approaches are fundamentally different, even though projective duality tells
us that points and lines are interchangeable. Why are these two algorithms so appar-
ently different? Are they actually minimizing different objectives?
Ex 2.2: 2D transform editor Write a program that lets you interactively create a set of
rectangles and then modify their “pose” (2D transform). Youshould implement the following
steps:
1. Open an empty window(“canvas”).
2. Shift drag (rubber-band) to create a new rectangle.
3. Select the deformation mode (motion model): translation, rigid, similarity, affine, or
perspective.
4. Drag any corner of the outline to change its transformation.
This exercise shouldbebuiltona setof pixelcoordinate and transformation classes, either
implemented by yourself or from a software library. Persistence of the created representation
(save and load) should alsobe supported (for each rectangle, save its transformation).
2.5 Exercises
95
Ex 2.3: 3D viewer Write a simple viewer for 3D points, lines, and polygons. Import a set
of point and line commands (primitives) as well as a viewing transform. Interactively modify
the object or camera transform. This viewer can be an extension of the one you created in
(Exercise2.2). Simply replace the viewingtransformations with their 3D equivalents.
(Optional) Add a z-buffer to do hidden surface removal for polygons.
(Optional) Use a 3D drawing package and just write the viewer control.
Ex 2.4: Focus distance and depth of field Figure out how the focus distance and depth of
field indicators on a lens are determined.
1. Compute and plot the focus distance z
o
as a function of the distance traveled from the
focal lengthz
i
=f   z
i
for a lens of focal length f (say, 100mm). Does this explain
the hyperbolic progression of focus distances you see on a typical lens (Figure2.20)?
2. Compute the depth of field (minimum and maximum focus distances) for a givenfocus
setting z
o
as a function of the circle of confusion diameter c (make it a fraction of
the sensor width), the focal length f, and the f-stop number N (which relates to the
aperture diameter d). Does this explain the usual depth of field markings on a lens that
bracket the in-focus marker, as in Figure2.20a?
3. Now consider a zoom lens with a varying focal length f. Assume that as you zoom,
the lens stays in focus, i.e., the distance from the rear nodal point to the sensor plane
z
i
adjusts itself automatically for a fixed focus distance z
o
. How do the depth of field
indicators vary as a function of focal length? Can you reproduce a two-dimensional
plot that mimics the curved depth of field lines seen on the lens in Figure2.20b?
Ex 2.5: F-numbers and shutter speeds List the common f-numbers and shutter speeds
that your camera provides. On older model SLRs, they are visible on the lens and shut-
ter speed dials. On newer cameras, you have to look at the electronic viewfinder (or LCD
screen/indicator) as you manually adjust exposures.
1. Do these form geometric progressions; if so, what are the ratios? How do these relate
to exposure values (EVs)?
2. If your camera has shutter speeds of
1
60
and
1
125
,do you think that these twospeeds are
exactly a factor of two apart or a factor of 125=60 = 2:083 apart?
3. How accurate do you think these numbers are? Can you devise some way to measure
exactly how the aperture affects how much light reaches the sensor and what the exact
exposure times actually are?
96
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Ex 2.6: Noise level calibration Estimate the amount of noise in your camera by taking re-
peated shots of a scene with the camera mounted on a tripod. (Purchasing a remote shutter
release is a good investment if you own a DSLR.) Alternatively, take a scene with constant
color regions (such as a color checker chart) and estimate the variance by fitting a smooth
function to each color region and then taking differences from the predicted function.
1. Plot your estimated variance as a function of level for each of your color channels
separately.
2. Change the ISO setting on your camera; if you cannot do that, reduce the overall light
in your scene (turn off lights, draw the curtains, wait until dusk). Does the amount of
noise vary a lot with ISO/gain?
3. Compare your camera to another one at a different price point or year of make. Is
there evidence to suggest that “you get what you pay for”? Does the quality of digital
cameras seem to be improving over time?
Ex 2.7: Gamma correction in image stitching Here’s a relatively simple puzzle. Assume
you are given two images that are part of a panorama that you want to stitch (see Chapter9).
The two images were taken with different exposures, so you want to adjust the RGB values
so that they match along the seam line. Is it necessary to undo the gamma in the color values
in order to achieve this?
Ex 2.8: Skin color detection Devise a simple skin color detector (ForsythandFleck1999;
Jones and Rehg 2001; Vezhnevets, Sazonov, and Andreeva 2003; Kakumanu, Makrogiannis,
and Bourbakis 2007)basedonchromaticityorothercolorproperties.
1. Take a variety of photographs of people and calculate the xy chromaticity values for
each pixel.
2. Crop the photos or otherwise indicate with a painting tool which pixels are likely tobe
skin (e.g. face and arms).
3. Calculate a color (chromaticity) distributionfor these pixels. You can use something as
simple as a mean and covariance measure or as complicated as a mean-shift segmenta-
tion algorithm (see Section5.3.2). You can optionally use non-skinpixels tomodel the
background distribution.
4. Use your computed distribution to find the skin regions in an image. One easy way to
visualize this is to paint all non-skin pixels a given color, such as white or black.
5. How sensitive is your algorithm to color balance (scene lighting)?
2.5 Exercises
97
6. Does a simpler chromaticity measurement, such as a color ratio (2.116), work just as
well?
Ex 2.9: White point balancing—tricky A common (in-camera or post-processing) tech-
nique for performing white pointadjustment is totake a picture of a white piece of paper and
to adjust the RGB values of an image to make this a neutral color.
1. Describe how you would adjust the RGB values in an image given a sample “white
color” of (R
w
;G
w
;B
w
)to make this color neutral (without changing the exposure too
much).
2. Does your transformation involve a simple (per-channel) scaling of the RGB values or
do you need a full 3  3 color twist matrix (or something else)?
3. Convert your RGB values to XYZ. Does the appropriate correction now only depend
on the XY (or xy) values? If so, when you convert back to RGB space, do you need a
full 3  3 color twist matrix to achieve the same effect?
4. If you usedpure diagonalscaling inthe directRGB mode but end up witha twist if you
work in XYZ space, how do you explain this apparent dichotomy? Which approach is
correct? (Or is it possible that neither approach is actually correct?)
If you want to find out what your camera actually does, continue on to the next exercise.
Ex 2.10: In-camera color processing—challenging If your camerasupports a RAW pixel
mode, takea pair of RAW and JPEG images, andsee if you can infer whatthe camerais doing
when it converts the RAW pixel values to the final color-corrected and gamma-compressed
eight-bit JPEG pixel values.
1. Deduce the pattern in your color filter array from the correspondence between co-
located RAW and color-mapped pixel values. Use a color checker chart at this stage
if it makes your life easier. You may find it helpful to split the RAW image into four
separate images (subsampling even and odd columns and rows) and to treat each of
these new images as a “virtual” sensor.
2. Evaluate the quality of the demosaicing algorithm by taking pictures of challenging
scenes which contain strong color edges (such as those shown in in Section10.3.1).
3. If you can take the same exact picture after changing the color balance values in your
camera, compare how these settings affect this processing.
4. Compare your results against those presented byChakrabarti,Scharstein,andZickler
(2009) or use the data available in their database of color images.26
26
http://vision.middlebury.edu/color/.
98
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested