c# pdf reader table : Delete pages from pdf document Library SDK class asp.net .net wpf ajax SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft12-part584

Chapter 3
Image processing
3.1 Pointoperators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
3.1.1
Pixeltransforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
3.1.2
Colortransforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.1.3
Compositingandmatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
3.1.4
Histogramequalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
3.1.5
Application:Tonaladjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
3.2 Linearfiltering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
3.2.1
Separablefiltering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
3.2.2
Examplesoflinearfiltering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
3.2.3
Band-passandsteerablefilters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
3.3 Moreneighborhoodoperators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
3.3.1
Non-linearfiltering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
3.3.2
Morphology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
3.3.3
Distancetransforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
3.3.4
Connectedcomponents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
3.4 Fouriertransforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
3.4.1
Fouriertransformpairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
3.4.2
Two-dimensionalFouriertransforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
3.4.3
Wienerfiltering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
3.4.4
Application:Sharpening,blur,andnoiseremoval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
3.5 Pyramidsandwavelets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
3.5.1
Interpolation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
3.5.2
Decimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
3.5.3
Multi-resolutionrepresentations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
3.5.4
Wavelets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
3.5.5
Application:Imageblending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
3.6 Geometrictransformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
3.6.1
Parametrictransformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
3.6.2
Mesh-basedwarping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
3.6.3
Application:Feature-basedmorphing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
3.7 Globaloptimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
3.7.1
Regularization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
3.7.2
Markovrandomfields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
3.7.3
Application:Imagerestoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
3.8 Additionalreading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
3.9 Exercises. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Delete pages from pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
add and delete pages in pdf; cut pages from pdf online
Delete pages from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf online
100
ComputerVision:AlgorithmsandApplications(September3,2010draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Figure3.1 Somecommonimageprocessingoperations: (a)originalimage;(b)increased
contrast;(c)changeinhue;(d)“posterized”(quantizedcolors);(e)blurred;(f)rotated.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page pdf online; cut pages from pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages on pdf
3.1Pointoperators
101
Nowthatwehaveseenhowimagesareformedthroughtheinteractionof3Dsceneelements,
lighting,andcameraopticsandsensors,letuslookatthefirststageinmostcomputervision
applications,namelytheuseofimageprocessingtopreprocesstheimageandconvertitinto
aformsuitableforfurtheranalysis.Examplesofsuchoperationsincludeexposurecorrection
andcolorbalancing,thereductionofimagenoise,increasingsharpness,orstraighteningthe
imagebyrotatingit(Figure3.1). Whilesomemayconsiderimageprocessingtobeoutside
thepurviewofcomputervision,mostcomputervisionapplications,suchascomputational
photographyandevenrecognition,requirecareindesigningtheimageprocessingstagesin
ordertoachieveacceptableresults.
Inthischapter,wereviewstandardimageprocessingoperatorsthatmappixelvaluesfrom
oneimagetoanother.Imageprocessingisoftentaughtinelectricalengineeringdepartments
asafollow-oncoursetoanintroductorycourseinsignalprocessing(OppenheimandSchafer
1996;Oppenheim,Schafer,andBuck1999). Thereareseveralpopulartextbooksforimage
processing(Crane1997;GomesandVelho1997;J¨ahne1997;Pratt2007;Russ2007;Burger
andBurge2008;GonzalesandWoods2008).
We begin this chapter with thesimplest kind of image transforms, namely thosethat
manipulateeachpixelindependentlyofitsneighbors(Section3.1). Suchtransformsareof-
tencalledpointoperatorsorpointprocesses. Next,weexamineneighborhood(area-based)
operators, whereeachnew pixel’svaluedependsonasmall numberofneighboring input
values(Sections3.2and3.3).Aconvenienttooltoanalyze(andsometimesaccelerate)such
neighborhoodoperationsistheFourierTransform,whichwecoverinSection3.4.Neighbor-
hoodoperatorscanbecascadedtoformimagepyramidsandwavelets,whichareusefulfor
analyzingimagesatavarietyofresolutions(scales)andforacceleratingcertainoperations
(Section3.5). Anotherimportant classofglobaloperatorsaregeometrictransformations,
suchasrotations,shears,andperspectivedeformations(Section3.6). Finally,weintroduce
globaloptimizationapproachestoimageprocessing,whichinvolvetheminimizationofan
energyfunctionalor,equivalently,optimalestimationusingBayesianMarkovrandomfield
models(Section3.7).
3.1 Pointoperators
Thesimplestkindsofimageprocessingtransformsarepointoperators,whereeachoutput
pixel’svaluedependsononlythecorrespondinginput pixel value(plus, potentially,some
globallycollectedinformationorparameters).Examplesofsuchoperatorsincludebrightness
andcontrastadjustments(Figure3.2)aswellascolorcorrectionandtransformations.Inthe
imageprocessingliterature,suchoperationsarealsoknownaspointprocesses(Crane1997).
Webeginthissectionwithaquickreviewofsimplepointoperatorssuchasbrightness
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf acrobat; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Create the new document with 3 pages. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pdf page acrobat
102
ComputerVision:AlgorithmsandApplications(September3,2010draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Figure3.2 Somelocalimageprocessingoperations:(a)originalimagealongwithitsthree
color(per-channel)histograms;(b)brightnessincreased(additiveoffset,b=16);(c)contrast
increased(multiplicativegain,a=1:1);(d)gamma(partially)linearized( =1:2);(e)full
histogramequalization;(f)partialhistogramequalization.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Create the new document with 3 pages. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" newDoc.Save(outputFilePath).
delete pdf pages ipad; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
delete page from pdf document; delete pages from pdf acrobat
3.1Pointoperators
103
45
60 98 127 7 132 2 133 137 133
46
65 98 123 3 126 6 128 131 133
47
65 96 115 5 119 9 123 135 137
47
63 91 107 7 113 3 122 138 134
50
59 80 97 110 0 123 133 134
49
53 68 83
97 113 3 128 133
50
50 58 70
84 102 2 116 126
50
50 52 58
69
86 101 1 120
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
S1
S2
S S S S S S S3
S10
S11S12
S13
S14S15
S16
0
20
40
60
8 0
100
120
1 40
160
range
domain
domain
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure3.3 Visualizingimagedata:(a)originalimage;(b)croppedportionandscanlineplot
usinganimageinspectiontool;(c)gridofnumbers;(d)surfaceplot.Forfigures(c)–(d),the
imagewasfirstconvertedtograyscale.
scaling and imageaddition. Next, wediscusshowcolorsinimagescanbemanipulated.
Wethen present imagecompositing and mattingoperations, whichplay animportantrole
incomputationalphotography(Chapter10)andcomputergraphicsapplications.Finally,we
describethemoreglobalprocessofhistogramequalization.Weclosewithanexampleappli-
cationthatmanipulatestonalvalues(exposureandcontrast)toimproveimageappearance.
3.1.1 Pixeltransforms
Ageneralimageprocessingoperatorisafunctionthattakesoneormoreinputimagesand
producesanoutputimage.Inthecontinuousdomain,thiscanbedenotedas
g(x)=h(f(x)) or g(x)=h(f
0
(x);:::;f
n
(x));
(3.1)
wherexisintheD-dimensionaldomainofthefunctions(usuallyD=2forimages)andthe
functionsfandgoperateoversomerange,whichcaneitherbescalarorvector-valued,e.g.,
forcolorimagesor2Dmotion.Fordiscrete(sampled)images,thedomainconsistsofafinite
numberofpixellocations,x=(i;j),andwecanwrite
g(i;j)=h(f(i;j)):
(3.2)
Figure3.3showshowanimagecanberepresentedeitherbyitscolor(appearance),asagrid
ofnumbers,orasatwo-dimensionalfunction(surfaceplot).
Twocommonlyusedpointprocessesaremultiplicationandadditionwithaconstant,
g(x)=af(x)+b:
(3.3)
Theparametersa>0andbareoftencalledthegainandbiasparameters;sometimesthese
parametersaresaidtocontrolcontrastandbrightness,respectively(Figures3.2b–c).
1
The
Animage’sluminancecharacteristicscanalsobesummarizedbyitskey(averageluminanance)andrange
(Kopf,Uyttendaele,Deussenetal.2007).
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pdf pages in preview
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages pdf online
104
ComputerVision:AlgorithmsandApplications(September3,2010draft)
biasandgainparameterscanalsobespatiallyvarying,
g(x)=a(x)f(x)+b(x);
(3.4)
e.g.,whensimulatingthegradeddensityfilterusedbyphotographerstoselectivelydarken
theskyorwhenmodelingvignettinginanopticalsystem.
Multiplicativegain(bothglobalandspatiallyvarying)isalinearoperation,sinceitobeys
thesuperpositionprinciple,
h(f
0
+f
1
)=h(f
0
)+h(f
1
):
(3.5)
(Wewillhavemoretosayaboutlinearshiftinvariant operatorsinSection3.2.) Operators
suchasimagesquaring(whichisoftenusedtogetalocalestimateoftheenergyinaband-
passfilteredsignal,seeSection3.5)arenotlinear.
Anothercommonlyuseddyadic(two-input)operatoristhelinearblendoperator,
g(x)=(1 )f
0
(x)+f
1
(x):
(3.6)
Byvaryingfrom0 ! 1,thisoperatorcanbeusedtoperformatemporalcross-dissolve
betweentwoimagesorvideos,asseeninslideshowsandfilmproduction,orasacomponent
ofimagemorphingalgorithms(Section3.6.3).
Onehighlyusednon-lineartransformthatisoftenappliedtoimagesbeforefurtherpro-
cessingisgammacorrection,whichisusedtoremovethenon-linearmappingbetweeninput
radianceandquantizedpixelvalues(Section2.3.2). Toinvertthegammamappingapplied
bythesensor,wecanuse
g(x)=[f(x)]
1=
;
(3.7)
whereagammavalueof 2:2isareasonablefitformostdigitalcameras.
3.1.2 Colortransforms
Whilecolorimagescanbetreatedasarbitraryvector-valuedfunctionsorcollectionsofinde-
pendentbands,itusuallymakessensetothinkaboutthemashighlycorrelatedsignalswith
strongconnectionstotheimageformationprocess(Section2.2),sensordesign(Section2.3),
andhumanperception(Section2.3.2).Consider,forexample,brighteningapicturebyadding
aconstantvaluetoallthreechannels,asshowninFigure3.2b.Canyoutellifthisachievesthe
desiredeffectofmakingtheimagelookbrighter? Canyouseeanyundesirableside-effects
orartifacts?
Infact,addingthesamevaluetoeachcolorchannelnotonlyincreasestheapparentin-
tensityofeachpixel,itcanalsoaffectthepixel’shueandsaturation.Howcanwedefineand
manipulatesuchquantitiesinordertoachievethedesiredperceptualeffects?
3.1Pointoperators
105
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure3.4 Imagemattingandcompositing(Chuang,Curless,Salesinetal.2001)  c c 2001
IEEE: (a) sourceimage; (b) extracted foreground object F; (c) alphamatte shown in
grayscale;(d)newcompositeC.
AsdiscussedinSection2.3.2,chromaticitycoordinates(2.104)orevensimplercolorra-
tios(2.116)canfirst becomputed andthenusedaftermanipulating (e.g.,brightening)the
luminanceY tore-computeavalidRGBimagewith thesamehueandsaturation. Figure
2.32g–ishowssomecolorratioimagesmultipliedbythemiddlegrayvalueforbettervisual-
ization.
Similarly, colorbalancing (e.g., to compensate forincandescent lighting)can beper-
formedeitherbymultiplyingeachchannelwithadifferentscalefactororbythemorecom-
plexprocessofmappingtoXYZcolorspace,changingthenominalwhitepoint,andmapping
backtoRGB,whichcanbewrittendownusingalinear33colortwisttransformmatrix.
Exercises2.9and3.1haveyouexploresomeoftheseissues.
Anotherfunproject,bestattemptedafteryouhavemasteredtherestofthematerial in
thischapter,istotakeapicturewitharainbowinitandenhancethestrengthoftherainbow
(Exercise3.29).
3.1.3 Compositingandmatting
Inmanyphotoeditingandvisualeffectsapplications,itisoftendesirabletocutaforeground
objectoutofonesceneandputitontopofadifferentbackground(Figure3.4).Theprocess
ofextracting theobject from theoriginal imageisoften called matting (SmithandBlinn
1996),whiletheprocessofinsertingitintoanotherimage(withoutvisibleartifacts)iscalled
compositing(PorterandDuff1984;Blinn1994a).
Theintermediaterepresentationusedfortheforegroundobjectbetweenthesetwostages
iscalledanalpha-mattedcolorimage(Figure3.4b–c). InadditiontothethreecolorRGB
channels,analpha-mattedimagecontainsafourthalphachannel(orA)thatdescribesthe
relativeamountofopacityorfractionalcoverageateachpixel(Figures3.4cand3.5b).The
opacityistheoppositeofthetransparency.Pixelswithintheobjectarefullyopaque(=1),
whilepixelsfullyoutsidetheobjectaretransparent( =0). Pixelsontheboundaryofthe
objectvarysmoothlybetweenthesetwoextremes,whichhidestheperceptualvisiblejaggies
106
ComputerVision:AlgorithmsandApplications(September3,2010draft)
(1 
)
+
=
B
F
C
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure3.5 Compositing equation C = (1 )B+F. Theimagesaretakenfroma
close-upoftheregionofthehairintheupperrightpartofthelioninFigure3.4.
thatoccurifonlybinaryopacitiesareused.
Tocompositeanew(orforeground)imageontopofanold(background)image,theover
operator, first proposedbyPorterandDuff(1984)andthenstudiedextensivelybyBlinn
(1994a;1994b),isused,
C=(1 )B+F:
(3.8)
ThisoperatorattenuatestheinfluenceofthebackgroundimageBbyafactor(1 )and
thenaddsinthecolor(andopacity)valuescorrespondingtotheforegroundlayerF,asshown
inFigure3.5.
Inmanysituations,itisconvenienttorepresenttheforegroundcolorsinpre-multiplied
form,i.e., to store(andmanipulate)theF valuesdirectly. AsBlinn(1994b)shows, the
pre-multiplied RGBArepresentation is preferredfor several reasons, including theability
toblurorresample(e.g.,rotate)alpha-mattedimageswithoutanyadditionalcomplications
(justtreating each RGBAband independently). However, whenmatting usinglocal color
consistency(RuzonandTomasi2000;Chuang,Curless,Salesinetal.2001),thepureun-
multipliedforegroundcolorsF areused,sincetheseremainconstant(orvaryslowly)inthe
vicinityoftheobjectedge.
Theoveroperationisnottheonlykindofcompositingoperationthatcanbeused.Porter
andDuff(1984)describeanumberofadditionaloperationsthatcanbeusefulinphotoediting
andvisualeffectsapplications.Inthisbook,weconcernourselveswithonlyoneadditional,
commonlyoccurringcase(butseeExercise3.2).
Whenlightreflectsoffcleantransparentglass,thelightpassing through theglassand
thelightreflectingofftheglassaresimplyaddedtogether(Figure3.6). Thismodelisuse-
fulintheanalysisoftransparentmotion(BlackandAnandan1996;Szeliski, Avidan,and
Anandan2000), whichoccurswhensuchscenesareobservedfromamovingcamera(see
Section8.5.2).
Theactualprocessofmatting,i.e.,recovering theforeground, background, andalpha
mattevaluesfromoneormoreimages,hasarichhistory,whichwestudyinSection10.4.
3.1Pointoperators
107
Figure3.6 Anexampleoflightreflectingoffthetransparentglassofapictureframe(Black
andAnandan1996)
c
1996Elsevier. Youcan clearlyseethewoman’sportraitinsidethe
pictureframesuperimposedwiththereflectionofaman’sfaceofftheglass.
Smith and Blinn(1996)haveanicesurveyoftraditionalblue-screenmattingtechniques,
whileToyama,Krumm,Brumittetal.(1999)reviewdifferencematting.Morerecently,there
hasbeenalot ofactivityincomputationalphotographyrelating to naturalimagematting
(RuzonandTomasi2000;Chuang,Curless,Salesinetal.2001;WangandCohen2007a),
whichattemptstoextractthemattesfromasinglenaturalimage(Figure3.4a)orfromex-
tendedvideosequences(Chuang,Agarwala,Curlessetal.2002).Allofthesetechniquesare
describedinmoredetailinSection10.4.
3.1.4 Histogramequalization
WhilethebrightnessandgaincontrolsdescribedinSection3.1.1canimprovetheappearance
ofanimage, howcanweautomaticallydeterminetheirbestvalues? Oneapproachmight
betolookatthedarkestandbrightestpixelvaluesinanimageandmapthemtopureblack
andpurewhite. Anotherapproachmightbetofindtheaveragevalueintheimage,pushit
towardsmiddlegray,andexpandtherangesothatitmorecloselyfillsthedisplayablevalues
(Kopf,Uyttendaele,Deussenetal.2007).
Howcanwevisualizethesetoflightnessvaluesinan imageinordertotestsomeof
theseheuristics? Theansweristoplotthehistogramoftheindividualcolorchannelsand
luminancevalues,asshowninFigure3.7b.Fromthisdistribution,wecancomputerelevant
statisticssuchastheminimum,maximum,andaverageintensityvalues.Noticethattheimage
inFigure3.7ahasbothanexcessofdarkvaluesandlightvalues,butthatthemid-rangevalues
arelargelyunder-populated.Woulditnotbebetterifwecouldsimultaneouslybrightensome
2
Thehistogramissimplythecountofthenumberofpixelsateachgraylevelvalue.Foraneight-bitimage,an
accumulationtablewith256entriesisneeded.Forhigherbitdepths,atablewiththeappropriatenumberofentries
(probablyfewerthanthefullnumberofgraylevels)shouldbeused.
108
ComputerVision:AlgorithmsandApplications(September3,2010draft)
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
0
50
100
150
200
250
B
G
R
Y
0
50000
100000
150000
200000
250000
300000
350000
0
50
100
150
200
250
B
G
R
Y
(a)
(b)
(c)
0
50
100
150
200
250
0
50
100
150
200
250
B
G
R
Y
(d)
(e)
(f)
Figure3.7 Histogramanalysisandequalization:(a)originalimage(b)colorchannelandin-
tensity(luminance)histograms;(c)cumulativedistributionfunctions;(d)equalization(trans-
fer)functions;(e)fullhistogramequalization;(f)partialhistogramequalization.
darkvaluesanddarkensomelight values, whilestill usingthefullextentoftheavailable
dynamicrange?Canyouthinkofamappingthatmightdothis?
Onepopularanswertothisquestionisto performhistogram equalization, i.e.,tofind
anintensitymapping function f(I)suchthat theresulting histogram is flat. Thetrick to
findingsuchamapping isthesameonethatpeopleusetogeneraterandomsamplesfrom
aprobabilitydensityfunction,whichistofirstcomputethecumulativedistributionfunction
showninFigure3.7c.
Thinkoftheoriginalhistogramh(I)asthedistributionofgradesinaclassaftersome
exam.Howcanwemapaparticulargradetoitscorrespondingpercentile,sothatstudentsat
the75%percentilerangescoredbetterthan3=
4
oftheirclassmates?Theansweristointegrate
thedistributionh(I)toobtainthecumulativedistributionc(I),
c(I)=
1
N
XI
i=0
h(i)=c(I 1)+
1
N
h(I);
(3.9)
whereNisthenumberofpixelsintheimageorstudentsintheclass.Foranygivengradeor
intensity,wecanlookupitscorrespondingpercentilec(I)anddeterminethefinalvaluethat
pixelshouldtake. Whenworkingwitheight-bitpixelvalues,theI andcaxesarerescaled
from[0;255].
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested