c# pdf reader table : Delete pages of pdf preview control application system azure web page windows console SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft15-part587

3.3 More neighborhood operators
129
 closing: close(f;s) = erode(dilate(f;s);s).
As we can see from Figure3.21, dilation grows (thickens) objects consisting of 1s, while
erosion shrinks (thins) them. The opening and closing operations tend to leave large regions
and smooth boundaries unaffected, while removing small objects or holes and smoothing
boundaries.
While we will not use mathematical morphology much in the rest of this book, it is a
handy tool to have around whenever you need to clean up some thresholded images. You
can find additional details on morphology in other textbooks on computer vision and image
processing (HaralickandShapiro1992, Section 5.2) (Bovik2000, Section 2.2) (Ritterand
Wilson 2000,Section7)aswellasarticlesandbooksspecificallyonthistopic(Serra 1982;
Serra and Vincent 1992; Yuille, Vincent, and Geiger 1992; Soille 2006).
3.3.3 Distance transforms
The distance transform is useful in quickly precomputing the distance to a curve or set of
points using atwo-pass raster algorithm (RosenfeldandPfaltz1966;Danielsson1980;Borge-
fors 1986;Paglieroni1992;Breu, Gil, Kirkpatricketal. 1995;Felzenszwalband Huttenlocher
2004a; Fabbri, Costa, Torelliet al. 2008).Ithasmanyapplications,includinglevelsets(Sec-
tion5.1.4), fast chamfer matching (binary image alignment) (Huttenlocher,Klanderman,and
Rucklidge1993),featheringinimagestitchingandblending(Section9.3.2),andnearestpoint
alignment (Section12.2.1).
The distance transform D(i;j) of a binary image b(i;j) is defined as follows. Let d(k;l)
be some distance metric between pixel offsets. Two commonly used metrics include the city
block or Manhattan distance
d
1
(k;l) = jkj + jlj
(3.43)
and the Euclidean distance
d
2
(k;l) =
p
k2 + l2:
(3.44)
The distance transform is then defined as
D(i;j) =
min
k;l:b(k;l)=0
d(i   k;j   l);
(3.45)
i.e., it is the distance to the nearest background pixel whose value is 0.
The D
1
city block distance transform can be efficiently computed using a forward and
backwardpass of asimple raster-scan algorithm, as shown in Figure3.22. Duringthe forward
pass, each non-zero pixel in b is replaced by the minimum of 1 + the distance of its north or
west neighbor. During the backward pass, the same occurs, except that the minimum is both
over the current value D and 1 + the distance of the south and east neighbors (Figure3.22).
Delete pages of pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
Delete pages of pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete pdf pages reader
130
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
.
0
0
0 0
1
0
0
0
0
0 0
1
0
0
0
0
0 0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0 1
0
0
0
0
1 1
1
0
0
0
0
1 1
2
0
0
0
0
1 1
2
0
0
0
0
1
1 1
0
0
0
1
1 1
1
1
0
0
1
2 2
3
1
0
0
1
2 2
3
1
0
0
1
2
2 2
1
0
0
1
1 1
1
1
0
0
1
2 3
0
1
2 2
1
1
0
0
1
2
2 1
1
0
0
1
1 1
0
0
0
0
1
2 1
0
0
0
0
1
2
1 0
0
0
0
0
1 0
0
0
0
0
0
1 0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0 0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 3.22 City block distance transform: (a) original binary image; (b) top to bottom
(forward) raster sweep: green values are used to compute the orange value; (c) bottom to top
(backward) raster sweep: green values are merged with old orange value; (d) final distance
transform.
Efficiently computing the Euclidean distance transform is more complicated. Here, just
keeping the minimum scalar distance to the boundary during the two passes is not sufficient.
Instead, a vector-valued distance consisting of both the x and y coordinates of the distance
tothe boundary must be kept and comparedusingthe squared distance (hypotenuse) rule. As
well, larger searchregions needtobe usedto obtainreasonable results. Rather thanexplaining
the algorithm (Danielsson1980;Borgefors1986) in more detail, we leave it as an exercise
for the motivated reader (Exercise3.13).
Figure3.11g shows a distance transform computed from a binary image. Notice how
the values grow away from the black (ink) regions and form ridges in the white area of the
original image. Because of this linear growth from the starting boundary pixels, the distance
transform is also sometimes known as the grassfire transform, since it describes the time at
which a fire starting inside the black region would consume any given pixel, or a chamfer,
because it resembles similar shapes used in woodworking and industrial design. The ridges
inthe distance transform become the skeleton (or medialaxis transform(MAT)) of the region
where the transform is computed, and consist of pixels that are of equal distance to two (or
more) boundaries (TekandKimia2003;SebastianandKimia2005).
Auseful extensionof thebasic distance transform is thesigned distance transform, which
computes distances to boundary pixels for all the pixels (Lavall´eeandSzeliski1995). The
simplest way to create this is to compute the distance transforms for both the original bi-
nary image and its complement and to negate one of them before combining. Because such
distance fields tend to be smooth, it is possible to store them more compactly (with mini-
mal loss in relative accuracy) using a spline defined over a quadtree or octree data structure
(Lavall´eeandSzeliski1995;SzeliskiandLavall´ee1996;Frisken, Perry, Rockwoodetal.
2000). Suchprecomputedsigneddistancetransformscanbeextremelyusefulinefficiently
aligning and merging 2D curves and 3D surfaces (Huttenlocher,Klanderman,andRucklidge
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; add and delete pages from pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pdf pages android; delete pages from pdf reader
3.3 More neighborhood operators
131
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 3.23 Connectedcomponentcomputation: (a) originalgrayscaleimage;(b) horizontal
runs (nodes) connectedbyvertical (graph) edges (dashed blue)—runs are pseudocoloredwith
unique colors inherited from parent nodes; (c) re-coloring after merging adjacent segments.
1993;Szeliski and Lavall´ee1996;Curless and Levoy 1996),especiallyifthevectorialversion
of the distance transform, i.e., a pointer from each pixel or voxel to the nearest boundary or
surface element, is stored and interpolated. Signed distance fields are also an essential com-
ponent of level set evolution (Section5.1.4), where they are called characteristic functions.
3.3.4 Connected components
Another useful semi-global image operation is finding connected components, which are de-
fined as regions of adjacent pixels that have the same input value (or label). (In the remainder
of this section, consider pixels to be adjacent if they are immediate N
4
neighbors and they
have the same input value.) Connected components can be used in a variety of applications,
such as finding individual letters in a scanned document or finding objects (say, cells) in a
thresholded image and computing their area statistics.
Consider the grayscale image in Figure3.23a. There are four connected components in
this figure: the outermost set of white pixels, the large ring of gray pixels, the white enclosed
region, and the single gray pixel. These are shown pseudocolored in Figure3.23c as pink,
green, blue, and brown.
Tocompute the connectedcomponents of an image, wefirst (conceptually) split the image
into horizontal runs of adjacent pixels, and then color the runs with unique labels, re-using
the labels of vertically adjacent runs whenever possible. In a second phase, adjacent runs of
different colors are then merged.
While this description is a little sketchy, it should be enough to enable a motivated stu-
dent to implement this algorithm (Exercise3.14). HaralickandShapiro(1992, Section 2.3)
give a much longer description of various connected component algorithms, including ones
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete page in pdf online; delete page in pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete blank page in pdf; delete blank pages from pdf file
132
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
that avoid the creation of a potentially large re-coloring (equivalence) table. Well-debugged
connected component algorithms are also available in most image processing libraries.
Once a binary or multi-valued image has been segmented into its connected components,
it is often useful to compute the area statistics for each individual region R. Such statistics
include:
 the area (number of pixels);
 the perimeter (number of boundary pixels);
 the centroid (average x and y values);
 the second moments,
M=
X
(x;y)2R
"
x
y
#
h
x y  
y
i
;
(3.46)
from which the major and minor axis orientation and lengths can be computed using
eigenvalue analysis.
7
Thesestatistics canthenbe used for further processing, e.g., for sorting theregions bythe area
size (to consider the largest regions first) or for preliminary matching of regions in different
images.
3.4 Fourier transforms
In Section3.2, we mentioned that Fourier analysis could be used to analyze the frequency
characteristics of various filters. In this section, we explain both how Fourier analysis lets us
determine these characteristics (or equivalently, the frequency content of an image) and how
using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) lets us perform large-kernel convolutions intime that
is independent of the kernel’s size. More comprehensive introductions to Fourier transforms
are provided byBracewell(1986);Glassner(1995);OppenheimandSchafer(1996);Oppen-
heim, Schafer, and Buck(1999).
How can we analyze what a given filter does to high, medium, and low frequencies? The
answer is to simply pass a sinusoid of known frequency through the filter and to observe by
how much it is attenuated. Let
s(x) = sin(2fx+ 
i
)= sin(!x+ 
i
)
(3.47)
MomentscanalsobecomputedusingGreen’stheoremappliedtotheboundarypixels(YangandAlbregtsen
1996).
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page from pdf preview; copy page from pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete pages of pdf reader; delete pages from pdf document
3.4 Fourier transforms
133
s(x)
o(x)
h(x)
s
o
x
x
A
φ
Figure 3.24 The Fourier Transform as the response of a filter h(x) to an input sinusoid
s(x) = e
j!x
yielding an output sinusoid o(x) = h(x)  s(x) = Ae
j!x+
.
be the input sinusoid whose frequency is f, angular frequency is ! = 2f, and phase is 
i
.
Note that in this section, we use the variables x and y to denote the spatial coordinates of an
image, rather than i and j as in the previous sections. This is both because the letters i and j
are used for the imaginary number (the usage depends on whether you are reading complex
variables or electrical engineering literature) and because it is clearer how to distinguish the
horizontal (x) and vertical (y) components in frequency space. In this section, we use the
letter j for the imaginary number, since that is the form more commonly found in the signal
processing literature (Bracewell1986;OppenheimandSchafer1996;Oppenheim,Schafer,
and Buck 1999).
If we convolve the sinusoidal signal s(x) with a filter whose impulse response is h(x),
we get another sinusoid of the same frequency but different magnitude A and phase 
o
,
o(x) = h(x)  s(x) = A sin(!x+ 
o
);
(3.48)
as shown in Figure3.24. To see that this is the case, remember that a convolution can be
expressedas a weighted summation of shifted input signals (3.14) and that the summation of
abunchof shifted sinusoids of the same frequency is justa single sinusoid atthatfrequency.
8
The new magnitude A is called the gain or magnitude of the filter, while the phase difference
 = 
o
i
is called the shift or phase.
In fact, a more compact notation is to use the complex-valued sinusoid
s(x) = e
j!x
=cos!x + j sin !x:
(3.49)
In that case, we can simply write,
o(x) = h(x)  s(x) = Ae
j!x+
:
(3.50)
Ifhisageneral(non-linear)transform,additionalharmonicfrequenciesareintroduced.Thiswastraditionally
the bane of audiophiles, who insisted on equipment with no harmonic distortion. Nowthat digital audio has intro-
duced pure distortion-freesound,some audiophiles arebuying retro tubeamplifiers ordigital signalprocessors that
simulate such distortionsbecause oftheir“warmersound”.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
cut pages from pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf file
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page in pdf; delete pages from a pdf reader
134
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
The Fourier transform is simply a tabulation of the magnitude andphase response at each
frequency,
H(!) = F fh(x)g = Ae
j
;
(3.51)
i.e., it is the response to a complex sinusoid of frequency ! passed through the filter h(x).
The Fourier transform pair is also often written as
h(x)
F
$H(!):
(3.52)
Unfortunately, (3.51) does not give an actualformulaforcomputingthe Fourier transform.
Instead, it gives a recipe, i.e., convolve the filter with a sinusoid, observe the magnitude and
phase shift, repeat. Fortunately, closed form equations for the Fourier transform exist both in
the continuous domain,
H(!) =
Z
1
1
h(x)e
j!x
dx;
(3.53)
and in the discrete domain,
H(k) =
1
N
NX 1
x=0
h(x)e
j
2kx
N
;
(3.54)
whereN is the length of the signal or region of analysis. These formulas applyboth tofilters,
such as h(x), and to signals or images, such as s(x) or g(x).
The discrete form of the Fourier transform (3.54) is knownas the Discrete Fourier Trans-
form (DFT). Note that while (3.54) can be evaluated for any value of k, it only makes sense
for values in the range k 2 [ 
N
2
;
N
2
]. This is because larger values of k alias with lower
frequencies and hence provide no additional information, as explained in the discussion on
aliasing in Section2.3.1.
At face value, the DFT takes O(N
2
)operations (multiply-adds) to evaluate. Fortunately,
there exists a faster algorithm called the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which requires only
O(N log
2
N) operations (Bracewell1986;Oppenheim,Schafer,andBuck1999). We do not
explain the details of the algorithm here, except to say that it involves a series of log
2
N
stages, where each stage performs small 22 transforms (matrix multiplications withknown
coefficients) followed by some semi-global permutations. (You will often see the term but-
terfly applied to these stages because of the pictorial shape of the signal processing graphs
involved.) Implementations for theFFT canbe found in mostnumericaland signalprocessing
libraries.
Now that we have defined the Fourier transform, what are some of its properties andhow
can they be used? Table3.1 lists a number of useful properties, which we describe in a little
more detail below:
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pdf page acrobat; delete page from pdf preview
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
cut pages from pdf; delete blank pages in pdf
3.4 Fourier transforms
135
Property
Signal
Transform
superposition
f
1
(x) + f
2
(x)
F
1
(!) + F
2
(!)
shift
f(x   x
0
)
F(!)e
j!x
0
reversal
f( x)
F
(!)
convolution
f(x) h(x)
F(!)H(!)
correlation
f(x)   h(x)
F(!)H
(!)
multiplication
f(x)h(x)
F(!) H(!)
differentiation
f
0
(x)
j!F(!)
domain scaling
f(ax)
1=aF(!=a)
real images
f(x) = f
(x) ,
F(!) = F( !)
Parseval’s Theorem
P
x
[f(x)]
2
=
P
!
[F(!)]
2
Table 3.1 Some useful properties of Fourier transforms. The original transform pair is
F(!) = Fff(x)g.
 Superposition: The Fourier transform of a sum of signals is the sum of their Fourier
transforms. Thus, the Fourier transform is a linear operator.
 Shift: The Fourier transform of a shifted signal is the transform of the original signal
multiplied by a linear phase shift (complex sinusoid).
 Reversal: The Fourier transform of a reversed signal is the complex conjugate of the
signal’s transform.
 Convolution: The Fourier transform of a pair of convolved signals is the product of
their transforms.
 Correlation: TheFourier transform of acorrelation is theproduct of the firsttransform
times the complex conjugate of the second one.
 Multiplication: The Fourier transform of the productof two signals is the convolution
of their transforms.
 Differentiation: The Fourier transform of the derivative of a signal is that signal’s
transform multiplied by the frequency. In other words, differentiation linearly empha-
sizes (magnifies) higher frequencies.
 Domain scaling: The Fourier transform of a stretched signal is the equivalently com-
pressed (and scaled) versionof the original transform and vice versa.
136
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
 Real images: The Fourier transform of a real-valued signal is symmetric around the
origin. This fact can be used to save space and to double the speed of image FFTs
by packing alternating scanlines into the real and imaginary parts of the signal being
transformed.
 Parseval’s Theorem: The energy (sum of squared values) of a signal is the same as
the energy of its Fourier transform.
All of these properties arerelatively straightforwardtoprove (seeExercise3.15) andtheywill
come in handy later in the book, e.g., when designing optimum Wiener filters (Section3.4.3)
or performingfast image correlations (Section8.1.2).
3.4.1 Fourier transform pairs
Now that we have these properties in place, let us look at the Fourier transform pairs of some
commonly occurring filters and signals, as listed in Table3.2. In more detail, these pairs are
as follows:
 Impulse: The impulse response has a constant (all frequency) transform.
 Shifted impulse: The shifted impulse has unit magnitude and linear phase.
 Box filter: The box (moving average) filter
box(x) =
(
1 if jxj  1
0 else
(3.55)
has a sinc Fourier transform,
sinc(!) =
sin !
!
;
(3.56)
which has an infinite number of side lobes. Conversely, the sinc filter is an ideal low-
pass filter. For a non-unit box, the width of the box a and the spacing of the zero
crossings in the sinc 1=a are inversely proportional.
 Tent: The piecewise linear tent function,
tent(x) = max(0;1   jxj);
(3.57)
has a sinc
2
Fourier transform.
 Gaussian: The (unit area) Gaussian of width ,
G(x;) =
1
p
2
e
x
2
2
2
;
(3.58)
has a (unit height) Gaussian of width 
1
as its Fourier transform.
3.4 Fourier transforms
137
Name
Signal
Transform
impulse
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
(x)
,
1
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
shifted
impulse
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
(x   u)
,
e
j!u
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
box filter
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
box(x=a)
,
asinc(a!)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
tent
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
tent(x=a)
,
asinc
2
(a!)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
Gaussian
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
G(x;)
,
p
2
G(!;
1
)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
Laplacian
of Gaussian
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
(
x
2
4
1
2
)G(x;)
,
p
2
!2G(!; 1)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
Gabor
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
cos(!
0
x)G(x;)
,
p
2
G(!  !
0
;
1
)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
unsharp
mask
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
(1 +  )(x)
G(x;)
,
(1+  ) 
p
2
G(!;
1
)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
windowed
sinc
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-1.0000
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
1.0000
rcos(x=(aW))
sinc(x=a)
,
(see Figure3.29)
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
-0.5000
0.0000
0.5000
Table 3.2 Some useful (continuous) Fourier transform pairs: The dashed line in the Fourier
transform of the shifted impulse indicates its (linear) phase. All other transforms have zero
phase (they are real-valued). Note that the figures are not necessarily drawn to scale but
are drawn to illustrate the general shape and characteristics of the filter or its response. In
particular, the Laplacian of Gaussianis drawninverted because it resembles more a “Mexican
hat”, as it is sometimes called.
138
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
 Laplacian of Gaussian: The second derivative of a Gaussian of width ,
LoG(x;) = (
x2
4
1
2
)G(x;)
(3.59)
has a band-pass response of
p
2
!
2
G(!;
1
)
(3.60)
as its Fourier transform.
 Gabor: Theeven Gabor function, whichis the product of a cosine of frequency !
0
and
aGaussian of width , has as its transform the sum of the two Gaussians of width   1
centered at ! = !
0
. The odd Gabor function, which uses a sine, is the difference
of two such Gaussians. Gabor functions are often used for oriented and band-pass
filtering, since they can be more frequency selective thanGaussianderivatives.
 Unsharp mask: The unsharp mask introduced in (3.22) has as its transform a unit
response with a slight boost at higher frequencies.
 Windowed sinc: The windowed (masked) sinc function shown in Table3.2 has a re-
sponse functionthat approximates anideal low-passfilter better andbetter as additional
side lobes are added (W is increased). Figure3.29 shows the shapes of these such fil-
ters along with their Fourier transforms. For these examples, we use a one-lobe raised
cosine,
rcos(x) =
1
2
(1 + cosx)box(x);
(3.61)
also known as the Hann window, as the windowing function. Wolberg(1990) and
Oppenheim, Schafer, and Buck(1999)discussadditionalwindowingfunctions,which
include the Lanczos window, the positive first lobe of a sinc function.
We can also compute the Fourier transforms for the small discrete kernels shown in Fig-
ure3.14 (see Table3.3). Notice how the moving average filters do not uniformly dampen
higher frequencies and hence can lead to ringing artifacts. The binomial filter (Gomesand
Velho 1997)usedasthe“Gaussian”inBurtandAdelson’s(1983a)Laplacianpyramid(see
Section3.5), does a decent job of separating the high and low frequencies, but still leaves
afair amount of high-frequency detail, which can lead to aliasing after downsampling. The
Sobel edge detector at first linearly accentuates frequencies, but then decays at higher fre-
quencies, and hence has trouble detecting fine-scale edges, e.g., adjacent black and white
columns. We look at additional examples of small kernel Fourier transforms in Section3.5.2,
where we study better kernels for pre-filtering before decimation (size reduction).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested