c# pdf reader table : Cut pages from pdf SDK Library API .net wpf azure sharepoint SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft2-part592

Contents
xxi
14.3.2 Large databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 687
14.3.3 Application: Location recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 693
14.4 Category recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 696
14.4.1 Bag of words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 697
14.4.2 Part-based models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701
14.4.3 Recognition with segmentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 704
14.4.4 Application: Intelligent photo editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 709
14.5 Context and scene understanding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 712
14.5.1 Learning and large image collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714
14.5.2 Application: Image search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717
14.6 Recognition databases andtest sets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718
14.7 Additional reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722
14.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725
15 Conclusion
731
A Linear algebra and numerical techniques
735
A.1 Matrix decompositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736
A.1.1 Singular value decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736
A.1.2 Eigenvalue decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737
A.1.3 QR factorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 740
A.1.4 Cholesky factorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 741
A.2 Linear least squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742
A.2.1 Total least squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 744
A.3 Non-linear least squares. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746
A.4 Direct sparse matrix techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 747
A.4.1 Variable reordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748
A.5 Iterative techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748
A.5.1 Conjugate gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 749
A.5.2 Preconditioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 751
A.5.3 Multigrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753
B Bayesian modeling and inference
755
B.1 Estimation theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757
B.1.1 Likelihoodfor multivariate Gaussian noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757
B.2 Maximum likelihood estimation and least squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 759
B.3 Robust statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 760
B.4 Prior models and Bayesian inference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762
B.5 Markov random fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 763
Cut pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf file
Cut pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete blank page from pdf
xxii
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
B.5.1 Gradient descent and simulated annealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765
B.5.2 Dynamic programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766
B.5.3 Belief propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 768
B.5.4 Graph cuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770
B.5.5 Linear programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773
B.6 Uncertainty estimation (error analysis). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775
C Supplementary material
777
C.1 Data sets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 778
C.2 Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 780
C.3 Slides and lectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789
C.4 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790
References
791
Index
933
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete pages pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf reader
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 What is computer vision? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2 A brief history. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.3 Book overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.4 Sample syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
1.5 A note on notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1.6 Additional reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Figure 1.1 The human visual system has no problem interpreting the subtle variations in
translucency and shading in this photograph and correctly segmenting the object from its
background.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages on pdf online
2
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 1.2 Some examples of computer vision algorithms and applications. (a) Structure
from motion algorithms can reconstruct a sparse 3D point model of a large complex scene
from hundreds of partially overlapping photographs (Snavely,Seitz,andSzeliski2006)
c
2006ACM. (b) Stereomatchingalgorithms canbuildadetailed3Dmodel of a buildingfac¸ade
from hundreds of differently exposed photographs taken from the Internet (Goesele,Snavely,
Curless etal. 2007)
c
2007 IEEE. (c) Persontracking algorithms cantrack a personwalking
in front of a cluttered background (Sidenbladh,Black,andFleet2000)  c 2000 Springer. (d)
Face detection algorithms, coupled with color-based clothing and hair detection algorithms,
can locate and recognize the individuals in this image (Sivic,Zitnick,andSzeliski2006)
c
2006 Springer.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete page in pdf document; delete page pdf file reader
1.1 What is computer vision?
3
1.1 What is computer vision?
As humans, we perceive the three-dimensional structureof the worldaroundus withapparent
ease. Think of how vividthe three-dimensional perceptis when you look at a vase of flowers
sittingon the table next to you. You can tellthe shape and translucency of each petal through
the subtle patterns of light and shading that play across its surface and effortlessly segment
each flower from the background of the scene (Figure1.1). Looking at a framed group por-
trait, you can easily count (and name) all of the people in the picture and even guess at their
emotions from their facial appearance. Perceptual psychologists have spent decades trying to
understand how the visual system works and, even though they can devise optical illusions
1
to tease apart some of its principles (Figure1.3), a complete solution to this puzzle remains
elusive (Marr1982;Palmer1999;Livingstone2008).
Researchers in computer vision have been developing, in parallel, mathematical tech-
niques for recovering the three-dimensional shape and appearance of objects in imagery. We
now have reliable techniques for accurately computing a partial3D model of anenvironment
from thousands of partially overlapping photographs (Figure1.2a). Given a large enough
set of views of a particular object or fac¸ade, we can create accurate dense 3D surface mod-
els using stereo matching (Figure1.2b). We can track a person moving against a complex
background (Figure1.2c). We can even, with moderate success, attempt to find and name
all of the people in a photograph using a combination of face, clothing, and hair detection
and recognition (Figure1.2d). However, despite all of these advances, the dream of having a
computer interpret an image at the same level as a two-year old (for example, counting all of
the animals in a picture) remains elusive. Why is vision so difficult? In part, it is because
vision is an inverse problem, in which we seek to recover some unknowns given insufficient
information to fully specifythesolution. We must thereforeresort to physics-basedandprob-
abilistic models to disambiguate between potential solutions. However, modeling the visual
world in all of its rich complexity is far more difficult than, say, modeling the vocal tract that
produces spoken sounds.
The forward models that we use in computer vision are usually developed in physics (ra-
diometry, optics, and sensor design) and in computer graphics. Both of these fields model
how objects move and animate, how light reflects off their surfaces, is scattered by the at-
mosphere, refracted through camera lenses (or human eyes), and finally projected onto a flat
(or curved) image plane. While computer graphics are not yet perfect (no fully computer-
animated movie with human characters has yet succeeded at crossing the uncanny valley
2
that separates real humans from android robots and computer-animated humans), in limited
1
http://www.michaelbach.de/ot/sze
muelue
ThetermuncannyvalleywasoriginallycoinedbyroboticistMasahiroMoriasappliedtorobotics(Mori1970).
Itis also commonly applied to computer-animated films such asFinal Fantasy and Polar Express (Geller2008).
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf document
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pdf page acrobat
4
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
O
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
O
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
O
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
X
O
X
(c)
(d)
Figure 1.3 Some common optical illusions and what they might tell us aboutthe visual sys-
tem: (a) The classic M
¨
uller-Lyer illusion, where the length of the two horizontal lines appear
different, probably due to the imagined perspective effects. (b) The “white” square B in the
shadowand the “black” square A in the light actually have the same absolute intensity value.
The percept is due to brightness constancy, the visual system’s attempt to discount illumi-
nation when interpreting colors. Image courtesy of Ted Adelson,http://web.mit.edu/persci/
people/adelson/checkershadow
illusion.html. (c)AvariationoftheHermanngridillusion,
courtesy of Hany Farid,http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/farid/illusions/hermann.html. As you
move your eyes over the figure, gray spots appear at the intersections. (d) Count the red Xs
in the left half of the figure. Now count them in the right half. Is it significantly harder?
The explanation has to do with a pop-out effect (Treisman1985), which tells us about the
operations of parallel perception and integration pathways in the brain.
1.1 What is computer vision?
5
domains, such as rendering a still scene composed of everyday objects or animating extinct
creatures such as dinosaurs, the illusion of reality is perfect.
In computer vision, we are trying to do the inverse, i.e., to describe the world that we see
inone or more images and to reconstruct its properties, suchas shape, illumination, and color
distributions. It is amazing that humans and animals do this so effortlessly, while computer
vision algorithms are so error prone. People who have not worked in the field often under-
estimate the difficulty of the problem. (Colleagues at work often ask me for software to find
andname all the people in photos, so they can get on with the more “interesting” work.) This
misperception that visionshould be easy dates back to the early days of artificial intelligence
(see Section1.2), when it was initially believed that the cognitive (logic proving and plan-
ning) parts of intelligence were intrinsically more difficult than the perceptual components
(Boden2006).
The goodnews is thatcomputer vision is being used today in a wide variety of real-world
applications, which include:
 Optical character recognition (OCR): reading handwritten postal codes on letters
(Figure1.4a) and automatic number plate recognition (ANPR);
 Machine inspection: rapid parts inspection for quality assurance using stereo vision
with specializedilluminationtomeasuretolerances on aircraft wings or auto bodyparts
(Figure1.4b) or looking for defects in steel castings using X-ray vision;
 Retail: object recognition for automated checkout lanes (Figure1.4c);
 3D model building (photogrammetry): fully automated construction of 3D models
from aerial photographs used in systems such as Bing Maps;
 Medical imaging: registering pre-operative and intra-operative imagery (Figure1.4d)
or performing long-term studies of people’s brain morphologyas they age;
 Automotive safety: detecting unexpected obstacles such as pedestrians on the street,
under conditions where active vision techniques such as radar or lidar do not work
well (Figure1.4e; see alsoMiller,Campbell,Huttenlocheretal.(2008);Montemerlo,
Becker, Bhat et al.(2008); Urmson, Anhalt, Bagnell et al.(2008)forexamplesoffully
automated driving);
 Match move: merging computer-generatedimagery (CGI) with live action footage by
tracking feature points in the source video to estimate the 3Dcamera motion and shape
of the environment. Such techniques are widely used in Hollywood (e.g., in movies
such as Jurassic Park) (Roble1999;RobleandZafar2009); they alsorequire the use of
precise matting to insert new elements between foreground and background elements
(Chuang,Agarwala,Curlessetal.2002).
6
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Figure 1.4 Some industrialapplications of computer vision: (a) opticalcharacter recognition
(OCR)http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/lenet/; (b) mechanical inspectionhttp://www.cognitens.
com/;(c)retail http://www.evoretail.com/;(d)medicalimaging http://www.clarontech.com/;
(e) automotive safetyhttp://www.mobileye.com/; (f) surveillance and traffic monitoringhttp:
//www.honeywellvideo.com/,courtesyofHoneywellInternationalInc.
1.1 What is computer vision?
7
 Motion capture (mocap): using retro-reflective markers viewed from multiple cam-
eras or other vision-based techniques to capture actors for computer animation;
 Surveillance: monitoring for intruders, analyzing highway traffic (Figure1.4f), and
monitoring pools for drowning victims;
 Fingerprint recognition and biometrics: for automatic access authentication as well
as forensic applications.
David Lowe’s Web site of industrial vision applications (http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/lowe/
vision.html)listsmanyotherinterestingindustrialapplicationsofcomputervision.Whilethe
above applications are all extremely important, they mostly pertain tofairly specializedkinds
of imagery and narrow domains.
In this book, we focus more on broader consumer-level applications, such as fun things
you can do with your own personal photographs and video. These include:
 Stitching: turning overlapping photos into a single seamlessly stitchedpanorama(Fig-
ure1.5a), as described in Chapter9;
 Exposure bracketing: merging multiple exposures taken under challenging lighting
conditions (strong sunlight and shadows) into a single perfectly exposed image (Fig-
ure1.5b), as described in Section10.2;
 Morphing: turning a picture of one of your friends into another, using a seamless
morph transition (Figure1.5c);
 3D modeling: converting one or more snapshots into a 3D model of the object or
person you are photographing (Figure1.5d), as described in Section12.6
 Video match move and stabilization: inserting 2D pictures or 3D models into your
videos by automatically tracking nearby reference points (see Section7.4.2)
3
or using
motion estimates to remove shake from your videos (see Section8.2.1);
 Photo-based walkthroughs: navigating a large collection of photographs, such as the
interior of your house, by flying between different photos in 3D (see Sections13.1.2
and13.5.5)
 Face detection: for improved camera focusing as well as more relevant image search-
ing (see Section14.1.1);
 Visual authentication: automatically logging family members onto your home com-
puter as they sit down in front of the webcam (see Section14.2).
8
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 1.5 Some consumer applications of computer vision: (a) image stitching: merging
different views (SzeliskiandShum1997)  c 1997 ACM; (b) exposure bracketing: merging
different exposures; (c) morphing: blending betweentwo photographs (Gomes,Darsa,Costa
et al. 1999)
c
1999 Morgan Kaufmann; (d) turning a collection of photographs into a 3D
model (Sinha,Steedly,Szeliskietal.2008)  c 2008 ACM.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested