c# pdf reader table : Delete page in pdf control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft20-part593

3.7 Global optimization
179
also be formulated using non-quadratic robust penalty functions (AppendixB.3). For exam-
ple, (3.100) can be generalized to
E
1r
=
X
i;j
s
x
(i;j)(f(i+ 1;j)   f(i;j))
(3.104)
+s
y
(i;j)(f(i;j + 1)   f(i;j));
where (x) is some monotonically increasing penalty function. For example, the family of
norms (x) = jxjp is called p-norms. When p < 2, the resulting smoothness terms become
more piecewise continuous than totally smooth, which can better model the discontinuous
nature of images, flow fields, and 3D surfaces.
An early example of robust regularization is the graduated non-convexity (GNC) algo-
rithm introduced byBlakeandZisserman(1987). Here, the norms on the data and derivatives
are clamped to a maximum value
(x) = min(x
2
;V ):
(3.105)
Because the resulting problem is highly non-convex (it has many local minima), a continua-
tion method is proposed, where a quadratic norm (which is convex) is gradually replaced by
the non-convex robust norm (AllgowerandGeorg2003). (Around the same time,Terzopou-
los(1988)wasalsousingcontinuationtoinferthetearandcreasevariablesinhissurface
interpolation problems.)
Today, itis more common to usethe L
1
(p = 1) norm, whichis oftencalledtotalvariation
(Chan,Osher,andShen2001;Tschumperl´eandDeriche2005;Tschumperl´e2006;Kaftory,
Schechner, and Zeevi 2007). Othernorms,forwhichtheinfluence(derivative)morequickly
decays to zero, are presented byBlackandRangarajan(1996);Black,Sapiro,Marimontet
al.(1998)anddiscussedinAppendixB.3.
Even more recently, hyper-Laplacian norms with p < 1 have gained popularity, based
on the observation that the log-likelihood distribution of image derivatives follows a p 
0:5   0:8 slope and is therefore a hyper-Laplacian distribution (Simoncelli1999;Levinand
Weiss 2007; Weiss andFreeman 2007; Krishnan and Fergus 2009).Suchnormshaveaneven
stronger tendency to prefer large discontinuities over small ones. See the related discussion
in Section3.7.2 (3.114).
While least squares regularized problems using L
2
norms can be solved using linear sys-
tems, other p-norms require different iterative techniques, suchas iteratively reweighted least
squares (IRLS), Levenberg–Marquardt, or alternation between local non-linear subproblems
and global quadratic regularization (KrishnanandFergus2009). Such techniques are dis-
cussed in Section6.1.3 and AppendicesA.3andB.3.
Delete page in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page in pdf preview
Delete page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf in preview; best pdf editor delete pages
180
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
3.7.2 Markov random fields
As we have just seen, regularization, which involves the minimization of energy functionals
defined over (piecewise) continuous functions, can be used to formulate and solve a variety
of low-level computer vision problems. An alternative technique is to formulate a Bayesian
model, which separately models the noisy image formation (measurement) process, as well
as assuming a statistical prior model over the solution space. In this section, we look at
priors based on Markov random fields, whose log-likelihood can be described using local
neighborhoodinteraction(or penalty) terms(KindermannandSnell1980;GemanandGeman
1984; Marroquin, Mitter, and Poggio 1987; Li 1995; Szeliski, Zabih, Scharstein et al. 2008).
The use of Bayesian modeling has several potential advantages over regularization (see
also AppendixB). The ability to model measurement processes statistically enables us to
extract the maximum information possible from each measurement, rather than just guessing
what weighting to give the data. Similarly, the parameters of the prior distribution can often
be learned by observing samples from the class we are modeling (RothandBlack2007a;
Tappen 2007; Li and Huttenlocher 2008). Furthermore,becauseourmodelisprobabilistic,
it is possible to estimate (in principle) complete probability distributions over the unknowns
being recovered and, in particular, to model the uncertainty in the solution, which can be
useful in latter processing stages. Finally, Markov random field models can be defined over
discrete variables, such as image labels (where the variables have no proper ordering), for
which regularization does not apply.
Recall from (3.68) in Section3.4.3(or see AppendixB.4) that, according to Bayes’ Rule,
the posterior distribution for a given set of measurements y, p(yjx), combined with a prior
p(x) over the unknowns x, is given by
p(xjy) =
p(yjx)p(x)
p(y)
;
(3.106)
wherep(y) =
R
x
p(yjx)p(x) is a normalizing constantused tomake the p(xjy) distribution
proper (integrate to 1). Taking the negative logarithm of both sides of (3.106), we get
logp(xjy) =   logp(yjx)   logp(x) + C;
(3.107)
which is the negative posterior log likelihood.
To find the most likely (maximum a posteriori or MAP) solution x given some measure-
ments y, we simplyminimize this negative loglikelihood, which canalso be thought of as an
energy,
E(x;y) = E
d
(x;y) + E
p
(x):
(3.108)
(We drop the constant C because its value does not matter duringenergy minimization.) The
first term E
d
(x;y) is the data energy or data penalty; it measures the negative log likelihood
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages pdf online; delete pages from a pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages pdf
3.7 Global optimization
181
that the data were observed given the unknown state x. The second term E
p
(x) is the prior
energy; it plays a role analogous to the smoothness energy in regularization. Note that the
MAP estimate may not always be desirable, since it selects the “peak” in the posterior dis-
tribution rather than some more stable statistic—see the discussion in AppendixB.2and by
Levin, Weiss, Durand et al.(2009).
For image processing applications, the unknowns x are the set of output pixels
x= [f(0;0) :::f(m   1;n   1)];
and the data are (in the simplest case) the input pixels
y= [d(0;0):::d(m   1;n   1)]
as shown in Figure3.56.
For a Markov random field, the probability p(x) is a Gibbs or Boltzmann distribution,
whose negative log likelihood (according to the Hammersley–Clifford theorem) can be writ-
ten as a sum of pairwise interactionpotentials,
E
p
(x) =
X
f(i;j);(k;l)g2N
V
i;j;k;l
(f(i;j);f(k;l));
(3.109)
whereN(i;j) denotes theneighbors of pixel(i;j). Infact, the general version of thetheorem
says that the energy may have to be evaluated over a larger set of cliques, which depend on
the order of the Markov random field (KindermannandSnell1980;GemanandGeman1984;
Bishop 2006; Kohli, Ladick´y, and Torr 2009; Kohli, Kumar, and Torr 2009).
The most commonly used neighborhood in Markov random field modeling is the N
4
neighborhood, where each pixel in the field f(i;j) interacts only with its immediate neigh-
bors. The model in Figure3.56, which we previously used in Figure3.55 to illustrate the
discrete version of first-order regularization, shows an N
4
MRF. The s
x
(i;j) and s
y
(i;j)
black boxes denote arbitrary interaction potentials between adjacent nodes in the random
field and the w(i;j) denote the data penalty functions. These square nodes can also be inter-
pretedas factors ina factor graphversion of the (undirected) graphical model (Bishop2006),
whichis another name for interactionpotentials. (Strictlyspeaking, the factorsare(improper)
probability functions whose product is the (un-normalized) posterior distribution.)
As we will see in (3.1123.113), there is a close relationship between these interaction
potentials and the discretized versions of regularized image restoration problems. Thus, to
afirst approximation, we can view energy minimization being performed when solving a
regularized problem and the maximum a posteriori inference being performed in an MRF as
equivalent.
While N
4
neighborhoods are most commonly used, in some applications N
8
(or even
higher order) neighborhoods perform better at tasks such as image segmentation because
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages of pdf preview; cut pages from pdf reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages pdf files; delete page from pdf file
182
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
f(i,j)
s
x
(i,j)
f(i,j+1)
s
y
(i,j)
w(i, j)
d(i, j)
f(i+1,j)
f(i+1,j+1)
Figure 3.56 Graphical model for an N
4
neighborhood Markov random field. (The blue
edges are added for an N
8
neighborhood.) The white circles are the unknowns f(i;j), while
the dark circles are the input data d(i;j). The s
x
(i;j) and s
y
(i;j) black boxes denote arbi-
trary interaction potentials between adjacent nodes intherandom field, andthe w(i;j) denote
the data penalty functions. The samegraphical model canbe usedto depict a discrete version
of a first-order regularization problem (Figure3.55).
theycanbetter modeldiscontinuitiesat different orientations (BoykovandKolmogorov2003;
Rother, Kohli, Feng etal. 2009;Kohli, Ladick´y, andTorr 2009;Kohli, Kumar, and Torr 2009).
Binary MRFs
The simplest possible example of a Markov random field is a binary field. Examples of such
fields include 1-bit(black and white) scanned document images as wellas images segmented
into foreground and background regions.
To denoise a scanned image, we set the data penalty to reflect the agreement between the
scanned and final images,
E
d
(i;j) = w(f(i;j);d(i;j))
(3.110)
and the smoothness penalty to reflect the agreement between neighboring pixels
E
p
(i;j) = E
x
(i;j)+ E
y
(i;j) = s(f(i;j);f(i+1;j)) +s(f(i;j);f(i;j + 1)): (3.111)
Once we have formulated the energy, how do we minimize it? The simplest approach is
toperform gradientdescent, flipping one state ata time if it produces alower energy. This ap-
proach is known as contextual classification (KittlerandF¨oglein1984), iterated conditional
modes (ICM) (Besag1986), or highest confidence first (HCF) (ChouandBrown1990) if the
pixel with the largest energy decrease is selected first.
Unfortunately, these downhill methods tend to get easily stuck in local minima. An al-
ternative approach is to add some randomness to the process, which is known as stochastic
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages pdf document; delete pdf pages android
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete pages in pdf
3.7 Global optimization
183
gradient descent (Metropolis,Rosenbluth,Rosenbluthetal.1953;GemanandGeman1984).
When the amount of noise is decreased over time, this technique is known as simulated an-
nealing (Kirkpatrick,Gelatt,andVecchi1983;Carnevali,Coletti,andPatarnello1985;Wol-
berg and Pavlidis 1985; Swendsen and Wang 1987)andwasfirstpopularizedincomputer
vision byGemanandGeman(1984) and later applied to stereo matching byBarnard(1989),
amongothers.
Even this technique, however, does not perform that well (Boykov,Veksler,andZabih
2001). Forbinaryimages,amuchbettertechnique,introducedtothecomputervisioncom-
munity byBoykov,Veksler,andZabih(2001) is to re-formulate the energy minimization as
amax-flow/min-cut graph optimization problem (Greig,Porteous,andSeheult1989). This
technique has informally come to be known as graph cuts in the computer visioncommunity
(BoykovandKolmogorov2010). For simple energy functions, e.g., those where the penalty
for non-identical neighboring pixels is a constant, this algorithm is guaranteedto produce the
global minimum. KolmogorovandZabih(2004) formally characterize the class of binary
energy potentials (regularity conditions) for which these results hold, while newer work by
Komodakis, Tziritas, and Paragios(2008)and Rother, Kolmogorov, Lempitsky et al.(2007)
provide good algorithms for the cases when they do not.
In additionto the above mentionedtechniques, a number of other optimizationapproaches
have been developed for MRF energy minimization, such as (loopy) belief propagation and
dynamic programming (for one-dimensional problems). These are discussed in more detail
in AppendixB.5as wellas the comparative survey paper bySzeliski,Zabih,Scharsteinetal.
(2008).
Ordinal-valued MRFs
In addition to binary images, Markov random fields can be applied to ordinal-valued labels
such as grayscale images or depth maps. The term ”ordinal” indicates that the labels have an
implied ordering, e.g., that higher values are lighter pixels. In the next section, we look at
unordered labels, suchas source image labels for image compositing.
In many cases, it is common to extend the binary data and smoothness prior terms as
E
d
(i;j) = w(i;j)
d
(f(i;j)   d(i;j))
(3.112)
and
E
p
(i;j) = s
x
(i;j)
p
(f(i;j)   f(i + 1;j)) + s
y
(i;j)
p
(f(i;j)   f(i;j + 1)); (3.113)
which are robust generalizations of the quadratic penalty terms (3.101) and (3.100), first
introduced in (3.105). As before, the w(i;j), s
x
(i;j) and s
y
(i;j) weights can be used to
locally control the data weighting and the horizontal and vertical smoothness. Instead of
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pages from a pdf document
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages in pdf reader; acrobat remove pages from pdf
184
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 3.57
Grayscale image denoising and inpainting: (a) original image; (b) image
corrupted by noise and with missing data (black bar); (c) image restored using loopy be-
lief propagation; (d) image restored using expansion move graph cuts. Images are from
http://vision.middlebury.edu/MRF/results/(Szeliski,Zabih,Scharsteinetal.2008).
using a quadratic penalty, however, a general monotonically increasing penalty function ()
is used. (Different functions can be used for the data and smoothness terms.) For example,
p
can be a hyper-Laplacian penalty
p
(d) = jdj
p
; p < 1;
(3.114)
which better encodes the distribution of gradients (mainly edges) in an image than either a
quadratic or linear (total variation) penalty.
24
Levin and Weiss(2007)usesuchapenalty
to separate a transmitted and reflected image (Figure8.17) by encouraging gradients to lie in
one or the other image, but not both. More recently,Levin,Fergus,Durandetal.(2007) use
the hyper-Laplacian as a prior for image deconvolution (deblurring) andKrishnanandFergus
(2009) develop a faster algorithm for solving such problems. For the data penalty, 
d
can be
quadratic (to model Gaussian noise) or the log of a contaminated Gaussian (AppendixB.3).
When 
p
is a quadratic function, the resulting Markov random field is called a Gaussian
Markov random field (GMRF) andits minimum can befoundby sparse linear system solving
(3.103). When the weighting functions are uniform, the GMRF becomes a special case of
Wiener filtering (Section3.4.3). Allowing the weighting functions to depend on the input
image (a special kind of conditional random field, which we describe below) enables quite
sophisticated image processing algorithms to be performed, including colorization (Levin,
Lischinski, and Weiss 2004),interactivetonemapping(Lischinski, Farbman, Uyttendaele et
al. 2006a),naturalimagematting(Levin, Lischinski, and Weiss 2008),andimagerestoration
(Tappen,Liu,Freemanetal.2007).
24
Notethat,unlikeaquadraticpenalty,thesumofthehorizontalandverticalderivativep-normsisnotrotationally
invariant. Abetter approach may be to locally estimate the gradient direction and to impose different norms on the
perpendicularand parallel components,whichRothandBlack(2007b)call asteerable randomfield.
3.7 Global optimization
185
(a) initial labeling
(b) standard move
(c) --swap
(d) -expansion
Figure 3.58 Multi-level graph optimization from (Boykov, Veksler,andZabih2001)
c
2001 IEEE: (a) initial problem configuration; (b) the standard move only changes one pixel;
(c) the --swap optimally exchanges all  and -labeled pixels; (d) the -expansion move
optimally selects amongcurrent pixel values and the  label.
When 
d
or 
p
are non-quadratic functions, gradient descent techniques such as non-
linear least squares or iteratively re-weighted least squares can sometimes be used (Ap-
pendixA.3). However, if the search space has lots of local minima, as is the case for stereo
matching (Barnard1989;Boykov,Veksler,andZabih2001), more sophisticated techniques
are required.
The extension of graph cut techniques to multi-valued problems was first proposed by
Boykov, Veksler, and Zabih(2001). Intheirpaper,theydeveloptwodifferentalgorithms,
called the swap move and the expansionmove, which iterate among aseries of binarylabeling
sub-problems tofinda goodsolution(Figure3.58). Notethat aglobalsolution is generallynot
achievable, as the problem is provably NP-hard for general energy functions. Because both
these algorithms use a binary MRF optimizationinside their inner loop, theyaresubject to the
kindof constraints ontheenergy functions that occur in the binarylabeling case(Kolmogorov
andZabih2004).AppendixB.5.4discussesthesealgorithmsinmoredetail,alongwithsome
more recently developed approaches to this problem.
Another MRF inference technique is belief propagation (BP). While belief propagation
was originally developed for inference over trees, where it is exact (Pearl1988), it has more
recently been applied to graphs with loops such as Markov random fields (Freeman,Pasz-
tor, and Carmichael 2000; Yedidia, Freeman, and Weiss 2001). Infact,someofthebetter
performing stereo-matching algorithms use loopy belief propagation (LBP) to perform their
inference (Sun,Zheng,andShum2003). LBP is discussed in more detail in AppendixB.5.3
as well as the comparative survey paper on MRF optimization (Szeliski,Zabih,Scharsteinet
al. 2008).
Figure3.57 shows an example of image denoising and inpainting (hole filling) using a
non-quadratic energy function (non-Gaussian MRF). The original image has been corrupted
by noise and a portion of the data has been removed (the black bar). In this case, the loopy
186
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
f(i,j)
s
x
(i,j)
f(i,j+1)
s
y
(i,j)
w(i, j)
d(i, j)
f(i+1,j)
f(i+1,j+1)
d(i, j+1)
Figure 3.59 Graphical model for a Markovrandom field witha more complexmeasurement
model. The additional colored edges show how combinations of unknown values (say, in a
sharp image) produce the measured values (a noisy blurred image). The resulting graphical
modelis still a classic MRF andis justas easy tosample from, but some inference algorithms
(e.g., those based on graph cuts) may not be applicable because of the increased network
complexity, since state changes during the inference become more entangledandthe posterior
MRF has much larger cliques.
belief propagation algorithm computes a slightly lower energy and also a smoother image
than the alpha-expansion graph cut algorithm.
Of course, the above formula (3.113) for the smoothness term E
p
(i;j) just shows the
simplest case. In more recent work,RothandBlack(2009) propose a Field of Experts (FoE)
model, which sums up a large number of exponentiated local filter outputs to arrive at the
smoothness penalty.WeissandFreeman(2007) analyze this approach and compare it to the
simpler hyper-Laplacian model of natural image statistics. LyuandSimoncelli(2009) use
GaussianScale Mixtures (GSMs) to construct an inhomogeneous multi-scale MRF, with one
(positive exponential) GMRF modulating the variance (amplitude) of another Gaussian MRF.
It is alsopossibletoextend themeasurementmodeltomakethesampled(noise-corrupted)
inputpixels correspondto blends of unknown (latent) image pixels, as in Figure3.59. This is
the commonly occurring case when trying to de-blur an image. While this kind of a model is
still a traditional generative Markov random field, finding an optimal solution can be difficult
because the clique sizes get larger. In such situations, gradient descent techniques, such
as iteratively reweighted least squares, can be used (Joshi, Zitnick, Szeliskietal. 2009).
Exercise3.31 has you explore some of these issues.
3.7 Global optimization
187
Figure 3.60 An unordered label MRF (Agarwala, Dontcheva,Agrawalaetal.2004)
c
2004 ACM: Strokes in each of the source images on the left are used as constraints on an
MRF optimization, whichis solved using graph cuts. The resulting multi-valued labelfield is
shown as a color overlay in the middle image, and the final composite is shown on the right.
Unordered labels
Another case with multi-valued labels where Markov random fields are often applied are
unordered labels, i.e., labels where there is no semantic meaning to the numerical difference
between the values of two labels. For example, if we are classifying terrain from aerial
imagery, it makes no sense to take the numeric difference between the labels assigned to
forest, field, water, and pavement. In fact, the adjacencies of these various kinds of terrain
each have different likelihoods, so it makes more sense to use a prior of the form
E
p
(i;j) = s
x
(i;j)V(l(i;j);l(i + 1;j)) + s
y
(i;j)V (l(i;j);l(i;j + 1));
(3.115)
where V(l
0
;l
1
) is a general compatibility or potential function. (Note that we have also
replaced f(i;j)with l(i;j) to makeitclearer that these are labelsrather than discrete function
samples.) An alternative way to write this prior energy (Boykov,Veksler,andZabih2001;
Szeliski, Zabih, Scharstein et al. 2008)is
E
p
=
X
(p;q)2N
V
p;q
(l
p
;l
q
);
(3.116)
where the (p;q) are neighboring pixels and a spatiallyvarying potentialfunction V
p;q
is eval-
uated for each neighboring pair.
Animportant application of unordered MRF labeling is seam findingin image composit-
ing (Davis1998;Agarwala,Dontcheva, Agrawalaetal.2004) (see Figure3.60, which is
explained in more detail in Section9.3.2). Here, the compatibility V
p;q
(l
p
;l
q
)measures the
quality of the visual appearance that would result from placing a pixel p from image l
p
next
to a pixel q from image l
q
.As with most MRFs, we assume that V
p;q
(l;l) = 0, i.e., it is per-
fectly fine to choose contiguous pixels from the same image. For different labels, however,
188
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 3.61 Image segmentation(BoykovandFunka-Lea2006)  c 2006Springer: The user
draws a few red strokes in the foreground object and a few blue ones in the background. The
system computes color distributions for the foreground and background and solves a binary
MRF. Thesmoothness weights are modulatedbythe intensitygradients (edges), whichmakes
this a conditional random field (CRF).
the compatibility V
p;q
(l
p
;l
q
)may depend on the values of the underlying pixels I
l
p
(p) and
I
l
q
(q).
Consider, for example, where one image I
0
is allsky blue, i.e., I
0
(p) = I
0
(q) = B, while
the other image I
1
has a transition from sky blue, I
1
(p) = B, to forest green, I
1
(q) = G.
I
0
:
p
q
p
q
:I
1
In this case, V
p;q
(1;0) = 0 (the colors agree), while V
p;q
(0;1) > 0 (the colors disagree).
Conditional random fields
In a classic Bayesian model (3.1063.108),
p(xjy) / p(yjx)p(x);
(3.117)
the prior distribution p(x) is independent of the observations y. Sometimes, however, it is
useful to modify our prior assumptions, say about the smoothness of the field we are trying
to estimate, in response to the sensed data. Whether this makes sense from a probability
viewpoint is something we discuss once we have explained the new model.
Consider the interactive image segmentation problem shown in Figure3.61 (Boykovand
Funka-Lea 2006).Inthisapplication,theuserdrawsforeground(red)andbackground(blue)
strokes, and the system then solves a binary MRF labeling problem to estimate the extent of
the foreground object. In addition to minimizing a data term, which measures the pointwise
similarity between pixel colors and the inferred region distributions (Section5.5), the MRF
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested