c# pdf reader table : Delete blank pages from pdf file SDK Library project winforms .net html UWP SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft23-part596

4.1 Points and patches
209
Figure 4.3 Image pairs with extracted patches below. Notice how some patches can be
localized or matched with higher accuracy than others.
feature matching stage (Section4.1.3) efficiently searches for likely matching candidates in
other images. The feature tracking stage (Section4.1.4) is an alternative to the third stage
that only searches a small neighborhood around each detected feature and is therefore more
suitable for video processing.
Awonderful example of all of these stages can be found in David Lowe’s (2004) paper,
which describes the development and refinement of his Scale Invariant Feature Transform
(SIFT). Comprehensive descriptions of alternative techniques can be found in a series of
survey and evaluation papers covering both feature detection (Schmid, Mohr, andBauck-
hage 2000; Mikolajczyk, Tuytelaars, Schmid et al. 2005; Tuytelaars and Mikolajczyk 2007)
and feature descriptors (MikolajczykandSchmid2005). ShiandTomasi(1994) andTriggs
(2004) also provide nice reviews of feature detection techniques.
4.1.1 Feature detectors
How can we find image locations where we can reliably find correspondences with other
images, i.e., whatare goodfeatures totrack (ShiandTomasi1994;Triggs2004)? Lookagain
at the image pair shown in Figure4.3 and at the three sample patches to see how well they
might be matched or tracked. As you may notice, textureless patches are nearly impossible
to localize. Patches with large contrast changes (gradients) are easier to localize, although
straight line segments at a single orientation suffer from the aperture problem (Hornand
Schunck 1981; Lucas and Kanade 1981; Anandan 1989), i.e., itis onlypossibletoalign
the patches along the direction normal to the edge direction (Figure4.4b). Patches with
Delete blank pages from pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page on pdf file; delete page in pdf file
Delete blank pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages out of pdf file; add or remove pages from pdf
210
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
x
x
i
x
i
+u
u
i
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 4.4 Aperture problems for different image patches: (a) stable (“corner-like”) flow;
(b) classic aperture problem (barber-pole illusion); (c) textureless region. The two images I
0
(yellow) and I
1
(red) are overlaid. The red vector u indicates the displacement between the
patch centers and the w(x
i
)weighting function (patch window) is shown as a dark circle.
gradients in at least two (significantly) different orientations are the easiest to localize, as
shown schematically in Figure4.4a.
These intuitions can be formalized bylooking at the simplest possible matching criterion
for comparing two image patches, i.e., their (weighted) summed square difference,
E
WSSD
(u) =
X
i
w(x
i
)[I
1
(x
i
+u)   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
;
(4.1)
where I
0
and I
1
are the two images being compared, u = (u;v) is the displacement vector,
w(x) is a spatially varying weighting (or window) function, and the summation i is over all
the pixels in the patch. Note that this is the same formulation we later use to estimate motion
between complete images (Section8.1).
When performing feature detection, we do not know which other image locations the
feature will end up being matched against. Therefore, we can only compute how stable this
metric is with respecttosmall variations inposition u by comparingan image patchagainst
itself, which is known as an auto-correlation function or surface
E
AC
(u) =
X
i
w(x
i
)[I
0
(x
i
+u)   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(4.2)
(Figure4.5).1 Note how the auto-correlation surface for the textured flower bed (Figure4.5b
and the red cross in the lower right quadrant of Figure4.5a) exhibits a strong minimum,
indicating that it can be well localized. The correlation surface corresponding to the roof
edge (Figure4.5c) has a strong ambiguity along one direction, while the correlation surface
corresponding to the cloud region (Figure4.5d) has nostable minimum.
1Strictlyspeaking,acorrelationistheproductoftwopatches(3.12);I’musingthetermhereinamorequalitative
sense. Theweighted sum of squared differences is often called an SSDsurface (Section8.1).
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages of pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete pages on pdf; delete blank page in pdf
4.1 Points and patches
211
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 4.5 Three auto-correlation surfaces E
AC
(u) shown as both grayscale images and
surface plots: (a) The original image is marked with three red crosses to denote where the
auto-correlation surfaces were computed; (b) this patch is from the flower bed (good unique
minimum); (c) this patch is from the roof edge (one-dimensional aperture problem); and (d)
this patch is from the cloud (no good peak). Each grid point in figures b–d is one value of
u.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
delete a page from a pdf online; acrobat export pages from pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf file
212
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Usinga Taylor Series expansionof the imagefunctionI
0
(x
i
+u)  I
0
(x
i
)+rI
0
(x
i
)
u (LucasandKanade1981;ShiandTomasi1994), wecanapproximatetheauto-correlation
surface as
E
AC
(u) =
X
i
w(x
i
)[I
0
(x
i
+u)   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(4.3)
X
i
w(x
i
)[I
0
(x
i
)+ rI
0
(x
i
) u   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(4.4)
=
X
i
w(x
i
)[rI
0
(x
i
)u]
2
(4.5)
=
u
T
Au;
(4.6)
where
rI
0
(x
i
)= (
@I
0
@x
;
@I
0
@y
)(x
i
)
(4.7)
is the image gradient at x
i
. This gradient can be computed using a variety of techniques
(Schmid,Mohr,andBauckhage2000). The classic “Harris” detector (HarrisandStephens
1988)usesa[-2-1012]filter,butmoremodernvariants(Schmid, Mohr, and Bauckhage
2000;Triggs 2004)convolvetheimagewithhorizontalandverticalderivativesofaGaussian
(typically with  = 1).
The auto-correlation matrix A can be written as
A= w 
"
I
2
x
I
x
I
y
I
x
I
y
I
2
y
#
;
(4.8)
wherewehave replacedtheweighted summationswith discrete convolutions with theweight-
ing kernel w. This matrix can be interpreted as a tensor (multiband) image, where the outer
productsof thegradients rI areconvolvedwith aweightingfunctionw to provide a per-pixel
estimate of the local (quadratic) shape of the auto-correlation function.
Asfirst shown by Anandan(1984;1989) andfurther discussedinSection8.1.3 and (8.44),
the inverse of the matrix A provides a lower bound on the uncertainty in the location of a
matching patch. It is therefore a useful indicator of which patches can be reliably matched.
The easiest way to visualize and reason about this uncertainty is to perform an eigenvalue
analysis of the auto-correlation matrix A, which produces two eigenvalues (
0
;
1
)and two
eigenvector directions (Figure4.6). Sincethelarger uncertaintydepends onthe smaller eigen-
value, i.e., 
1=2
0
,it makes sense to find maxima in the smaller eigenvalue to locate good
features to track (ShiandTomasi1994).
F¨orstner–Harris. WhileAnandanandLucasandKanade(1981)werethefirsttoanalyze
the uncertainty structure of the auto-correlation matrix, they did so in the context of asso-
ciating certainties with optic flow measurements. F¨orstner(1986) andHarrisandStephens
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
how to rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page Add and Insert a blank Page to Word File in C#. following C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
delete page in pdf online; delete a page from a pdf in preview
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to rotate PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page Add and Insert a blank Page to PowerPoint File in C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
delete pdf pages acrobat; copy page from pdf
4.1 Points and patches
213
Figure 4.6 Uncertainty ellipse corresponding to an eigenvalue analysis of the auto-
correlation matrix A.
(1988) were the first to propose using local maxima in rotationally invariant scalar measures
derived from the auto-correlation matrix to locate keypoints for the purpose of sparse feature
matching. (Schmid,Mohr,andBauckhage(2000);Triggs(2004) give more detailed histori-
cal reviews of feature detection algorithms.) Both of these techniques also proposed using a
Gaussian weighting window instead of the previously used square patches, which makes the
detector response insensitive to in-plane image rotations.
The minimum eigenvalue 
0
(ShiandTomasi1994) is not the only quantity that can be
used to find keypoints. A simpler quantity, proposed byHarrisandStephens(1988), is
det(A)    trace(A)
2
=
0
1
(
0
+
1
)
2
(4.9)
with  = 0:06. Unlike eigenvalue analysis, this quantity does not require the use of square
roots and yet is still rotationally invariant and also downweights edge-like features where
1

0
.Triggs(2004) suggests using the quantity
0

1
(4.10)
(say, with  = 0:05), which also reduces the response at 1D edges, where aliasing errors
sometimes inflate the smaller eigenvalue. He also shows how the basic 2  2 Hessian can be
extended to parametric motions to detect points that are also accurately localizable in scale
androtation.Brown,Szeliski,andWinder(2005), on the other hand, use the harmonic mean,
det A
tr A
=
0
1
0
+
1
;
(4.11)
which is a smoother function in the region where 
0
 
1
. Figure4.7 shows isocontours
of the various interest point operators, from which we can see how the two eigenvalues are
blended to determine the final interest value.
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument.Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
delete pdf pages; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into
delete pages from a pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
214
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 4.7
Isocontours of popular keypoint detection functions (Brown, Szeliski, and
Winder 2004). Each h detector looks for points where e the eigenvalues 
0
;
1
of A =
wrIrI
T
are bothlarge.
1. Compute the horizontal and vertical derivatives of the image I
x
and I
y
by con-
volving the original image with derivatives of Gaussians (Section3.2.3).
2. Compute the three images corresponding to the outer products of these gradients.
(The matrix Ais symmetric, soonly three entries are needed.)
3. Convolve each of these images with a larger Gaussian.
4. Compute a scalar interest measure using one of the formulas discussed above.
5. Find local maxima above a certain threshold and report them as detected feature
point locations.
Algorithm 4.1 Outline of a basic feature detection algorithm.
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from a pdf file
4.1 Points and patches
215
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 4.8 Interest operator responses: (a) Sample image, (b) Harris response, and (c) DoG
response. The circle sizes and colors indicate the scale at which each interest point was
detected. Notice how the two detectors tend to respondat complementary locations.
The steps in the basic auto-correlation-based keypoint detector are summarized in Algo-
rithm4.1. Figure4.8 shows the resulting interest operator responses for the classic Harris
detector as well as the difference of Gaussian (DoG) detector discussed below.
Adaptive non-maximal suppression (ANMS). Whilemostfeaturedetectorssimplylook
for local maxima in the interest function, this can lead to an uneven distribution of feature
points across the image, e.g., points will be denser in regions of higher contrast. To mitigate
this problem, Brown,Szeliski, andWinder(2005) only detect features that are both local
maxima and whose response value is significantly (10%) greater than that of all of its neigh-
bors within a radius r (Figure4.9c–d). They devise an efficient way to associate suppression
radii with all local maxima by first sorting them by their response strength and then creating
asecond list sorted by decreasing suppression radius (Brown,Szeliski,andWinder2005).
Figure4.9 shows a qualitative comparison of selecting the top n features and using ANMS.
Measuring repeatability. Giventhelargenumberoffeaturedetectorsthathavebeende-
veloped in computer vision, how can we decide which ones to use? Schmid, Mohr, and
Bauckhage(2000)werethefirsttoproposemeasuringtherepeatabilityoffeaturedetectors,
which they define as the frequency with which keypoints detected in one image are found
within  (say,  = 1:5) pixels of the corresponding location in a transformed image. In their
paper, they transform their planar images by applying rotations, scale changes, illumination
changes, viewpoint changes, and adding noise. They also measure the information content
available at each detected feature point, which they define as the entropy of a set of rotation-
ally invariant local grayscale descriptors. Among the techniques they survey, they find that
the improved (Gaussian derivative) version of the Harris operator with 
d
=1 (scale of the
derivative Gaussian) and 
i
=2 (scale of the integration Gaussian) works best.
216
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a) Strongest 250
(b) Strongest 500
(c) ANMS 250, r = 24
(d) ANMS 500, r = 16
Figure 4.9
Adaptive non-maximal suppression (ANMS) (Brown, Szeliski, andWinder
2005)
c
2005 IEEE: The upper two images show the strongest 250 and 500 interest points,
while the lower twoimages show the interest points selectedwith adaptive non-maximal sup-
pression, along with the corresponding suppression radius r. Note how the latter features
have a much more uniform spatial distribution across the image.
Scale invariance
In many situations, detecting features at the finest stable scale possible may not be appro-
priate. For example, when matching images with little high frequency detail (e.g., clouds),
fine-scale features may not exist.
One solution to the problem is to extractfeatures at avariety of scales, e.g., byperforming
the same operations at multiple resolutions in a pyramid and then matching features at the
same level. This kind of approach is suitable when the images being matched do not undergo
large scale changes, e.g., when matching successive aerial images taken from an airplane or
stitching panoramas taken with a fixed-focal-length camera. Figure4.10 shows the output of
one such approach, the multi-scale, oriented patch detector ofBrown,Szeliski,andWinder
(2005), for which responses at five different scales are shown.
However, for most object recognition applications, the scale of the object in the image
4.1 Points and patches
217
Figure 4.10 Multi-scale oriented patches (MOPS) extracted at five pyramid levels (Brown,
Szeliski, and Winder 2005) c 2005IEEE.Theboxesshowthefeatureorientationandthe
region from which the descriptor vectors are sampled.
is unknown. Instead of extracting features at many different scales and then matching all of
them, it is more efficient to extract features that are stable in both location and scale (Lowe
2004; Mikolajczyk and Schmid 2004).
Early investigations into scale selection were performed by Lindeberg (1993;1998b),
who first proposed using extrema in the Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) function as interest
point locations. Based on this work,Lowe(2004) proposed computing a set of sub-octave
Difference of Gaussian filters (Figure4.11a), looking for 3D (space+scale) maxima in the re-
sultingstructure (Figure4.11b), and then computing a sub-pixel space+scale location using a
quadraticfit(BrownandLowe2002). The number of sub-octave levels was determined, after
careful empirical investigation, to be three, which corresponds to a quarter-octave pyramid,
which is the same as used byTriggs(2004).
As withthe Harris operator, pixels where there is strongasymmetry in the local curvature
of the indicator function (in this case, the DoG) are rejected. This is implemented by first
computing the local Hessian of the difference image D,
H=
"
D
xx
D
xy
D
xy
D
yy
#
;
(4.12)
and then rejecting keypoints for which
Tr(H)
2
Det(H)
>10:
(4.13)
218
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Scale
(first
octave)
Scale
(next
octave)
Gaussian
Difference of
Gaussian (DOG)
. . .
Figure 1: Foreachoctave ofscale space,theinitial image isrepeatedlyconvolvedwithGaussiansto
produce the set ofscale space imagesshown onthe left. Adjacent Gaussian imagesare subtracted
toproduce thedifference-of-Gaussianimageson theright. Aftereachoctave,theGaussianimage is
down-sampledbya factorof2,andtheprocessrepeated.
In addition, the difference-of-Gaussian function provides aclose approximation to the
scale-normalizedLaplacianofGaussian,
σ22G
,asstudied byLindeberg(1994).Lindeberg
showed that thenormalization ofthe Laplacian with thefactor
σ2
isrequired fortruescale
invariance. Indetailedexperimental comparisons,Mikolajczyk(2002)foundthatthemaxima
andminimaof
σ22G
producethemoststableimagefeatures comparedtoarangeofother
possibleimagefunctions, suchasthegradient, Hessian, orHarriscornerfunction.
Therelationship between
D
and
σ22G
canbeunderstoodfromtheheatdiffusionequa-
tion (parameterized intermsof
σ
ratherthan themoreusual
t=σ
2
):
∂G
∂σ
=σ∇2G.
From this, wesee that
2G
can be computed fromthe ®nite difference approximation to
∂G/∂σ
,usingthedifferenceofnearby scalesat
and
σ
:
σ∇2G=
∂G
∂σ
G(x,y,kσ)−G(x,y,σ)
kσ−σ
andtherefore,
G(x,y,kσ)−G(x,y,σ) ≈(k −1)σ22G.
This shows that when the difference-of-Gaussian function has scales differing by a con-
stant factoritalready incorporates the
σ2
scalenormalizationrequiredforthescale-invariant
6
Scale
Figure 2: Maxima and minima of the difference-of-Gaussianimagesare detected by comparinga
pixel(markedwithX) to its26neighbors in 3x3regionsatthe currentand adjacentscales (marked
withcircles).
Laplacian. The factor
(k −1)
inthe equation is a constant over all scalesand therefore does
not influence extrema location. The approximation error will go to zero as
k
goes to 1,but
in practice we have found that the approximation has almost no impact on the stability of
extrema detection or localization for even signi®cantdifferencesin scale,such as
k=
An ef®cient approach to construction of
D(x,y,σ)
is shown in Figure 1. The initial
image isincrementally convolved withGaussians to produce imagesseparated by a constant
factor
k
in scale space, shown stacked in the leftcolumn. We choose to divide each octave
of scale space (i.e., doubling of
σ
) into an integer number,
s
,of intervals, so
k = 2
We must produce
s+ 3
images in the stack of blurred images for each octave, so that ®nal
extrema detectioncovers a complete octave. Adjacentimage scalesare subtracted to produce
the difference-of-Gaussian images shown on the right. Once a complete octave has been
processed, we resample the Gaussian image thathastwice the initialvalue of
σ
(itwill be 2
images from the topof the stack) bytaking every second pixel ineachrow andcolumn.The
accuracy of sampling relative to
σ
is no different than for the start of the previous octave,
while computationis greatly reduced.
3.1 Local extremadetection
Inorder todetectthe local maxima andminima of
D(x,y,σ)
,each sample pointiscompared
to its eight neighbors in the current image and nine neighbors in the scale above and below
(see Figure 2). Itisselected only if itis larger than all of these neighbors or smaller than all
of them.The costof this check isreasonably lowdue to the fact thatmostsample pointswill
be eliminated following the ®rstfew checks.
Animportant issue isto determine the frequency of sampling inthe image and scale do-
mains that is needed to reliably detect the extrema. Unfortunately, it turns out that there is
no minimum spacing of samples that willdetect all extrema, as the extrema can be arbitrar-
ily close together. This can be seen by considering a white circle on a black background,
which will have a single scale space maximum where the circular positive central region of
the difference-of-Gaussian function matches the size and location of the circle. For a very
elongated ellipse, there willbe two maxima near each endof the ellipse. As the locations of
maximaare acontinuous functionof theimage,forsome ellipse withintermediate elongation
there willbe a transition from asingle maximumto two,with the maximaarbitrarily close to
7
(a)
(b)
Figure 4.11 Scale-space feature detection using a sub-octave Difference of Gaussian pyra-
mid (Lowe2004)
c
2004 Springer: (a) Adjacent levels of a sub-octave Gaussian pyramid
are subtracted to produce Difference of Gaussian images; (b) extrema (maxima and minima)
in the resulting 3D volume are detected by comparing a pixel to its 26 neighbors.
While Lowe’sScale InvariantFeature Transform (SIFT) performs well in practice, it is not
basedonthe same theoretical foundationof maximum spatial stabilityas the auto-correlation-
based detectors. (In fact, its detection locations are often complementary to those produced
by such techniques and can therefore be used in conjunction with these other approaches.)
In order to add a scale selection mechanism to the Harris corner detector,Mikolajczykand
Schmid(2004)evaluatetheLaplacianofGaussianfunctionateachdetectedHarrispoint(in
amulti-scale pyramid) and keep only those points for which the Laplacian is extremal (larger
or smaller than both its coarser and finer-level values). An optional iterative refinement for
bothscale and positionis alsoproposed and evaluated. Additional examplesof scale invariant
region detectors are discussed byMikolajczyk,Tuytelaars,Schmidetal.(2005);Tuytelaars
and Mikolajczyk(2007).
Rotational invariance and orientation estimation
In addition to dealing with scale changes, most image matching and object recognition algo-
rithms need to deal with(atleast) in-plane image rotation. One wayto deal with this problem
is to design descriptors that are rotationally invariant (SchmidandMohr1997), but such
descriptors have poor discriminability, i.e. they map different looking patches to the same
descriptor.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested