c# pdf reader table : Delete pages out of a pdf application software utility azure winforms html visual studio SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft29-part602

5Segmentation
269
Image segmentationis the taskof finding groupsof pixels that“gotogether”. In statistics, this
problem is known as cluster analysis and is a widely studied area with hundreds of different
algorithms (JainandDubes1988;KaufmanandRousseeuw1990;Jain,Duin,andMao2000;
Jain, Topchy, Law et al. 2004).
In computer vision, image segmentationis oneof the oldestandmost widelystudiedprob-
lems (BriceandFennema1970;Pavlidis1977;RisemanandArbib1977;Ohlander,Price,
and Reddy 1978; Rosenfeld and Davis 1979; Haralick and Shapiro 1985). Earlytechniques
tendtouse regionsplittingor merging(BriceandFennema1970;HorowitzandPavlidis1976;
Ohlander, Price, andReddy 1978;Pavlidis and Liow 1990),whichcorrespondtodivisiveand
agglomerative algorithms in the clustering literature (Jain,Topchy,Lawetal.2004). More
recent algorithms often optimize some global criterion, such as intra-region consistency and
inter-region boundary lengths or dissimilarity (Leclerc1989;MumfordandShah1989;Shi
andMalik2000;ComaniciuandMeer 2002;FelzenszwalbandHuttenlocher 2004b; Cremers,
Rousson, and Deriche 2007).
We have already seen examples of image segmentation in Sections3.3.2 and3.7.2. In
this chapter, we review some additional techniques that have been developed for image seg-
mentation. These include algorithms based on active contours (Section5.1) and level sets
(Section5.1.4), region splitting and merging (Section5.2), mean shift (mode finding) (Sec-
tion5.3), normalized cuts (splitting based on pixel similarity metrics) (Section5.4), and bi-
nary Markov random fields solved using graph cuts (Section5.5). Figure5.1 shows some
examples of these techniques applied to different images.
Since the literature onimage segmentation is so vast, a good way to get a handle on some
of the better performing algorithms is to look at experimentalcomparisons on human-labeled
databases (Arbel´aez,Maire,Fowlkesetal.2010). The best known of these is the Berkeley
Segmentation Dataset and Benchmark
1
(Martin,Fowlkes,Taletal.2001), which consists
of 1000 images from a Corel image dataset that were hand-labeled by 30 human subjects.
Many of the more recent image segmentation algorithms report comparative results on this
database. For example, Unnikrishnan, Pantofaru,andHebert(2007) propose new metrics
for comparing such algorithms. EstradaandJepson (2009) compare four well-known seg-
mentation algorithms on the Berkeley data set and conclude that while their own SE-MinCut
algorithm (Estrada,Jepson,andChennubhotla2004) algorithm outperforms the others by a
small margin, there still exists a wide gap between automated and human segmentation per-
formance.2 A new database of foreground and background segmentations, used byAlpert,
Galun, Basri et al.(2007),isalsoavailable.
3
http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/Projects/CS/vision/grouping/segbench/
2
An interesting observation about their ROC plots is that automated techniques cluster tightly along similar
curves,but humanperformance is all overthe map.
3
http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/vision/Seg
Evaluation
DB/index.html
Delete pages out of a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Delete pages out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf file; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
270
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
5.1 Active contours
While lines, vanishing points, and rectangles are commonplace in the man-made world,
curves corresponding to object boundaries are even more common, especially in the natural
environment. In this section, we describe three related approaches to locating such boundary
curves in images.
The first, originally called snakes by its inventors (Kass,Witkin,andTerzopoulos1988)
(Section5.1.1), is an energy-minimizing, two-dimensional spline curve that evolves (moves)
towards image features such as strong edges. The second, intelligent scissors (Mortensen
and Barrett 1995)(Section5.1.3),allowtheusertosketchinrealtimeacurvethatclingsto
object boundaries. Finally, level set techniques (Section5.1.4) evolve the curve as the zero-
set of a characteristic function, whichallows them to easily change topology and incorporate
region-based statistics.
All three of these are examples of active contours (BlakeandIsard1998;Mortensen
1999),sincetheseboundarydetectorsiterativelymovetowardstheirfinalsolutionunderthe
combination of image and optional user-guidance forces.
5.1.1 Snakes
Snakes are a two-dimensional generalization of the 1D energy-minimizingsplines first intro-
duced in Section3.7.1,
E
int
=
Z
(s)kf
s
(s)k
2
+(s)kf
ss
(s)k
2
ds;
(5.1)
where s is the arc-length along the curve f(s) = (x(s);y(s)) and (s) and (s) are first-
and second-order continuity weighting functions analogous to the s(x;y) and c(x;y) terms
introduced in (3.1003.101). We can discretize this energy by sampling the initial curve
position evenly along its length (Figure4.35) to obtain
E
int
=
X
i
(i)kf(i + 1)   f(i)k
2
=h
2
(5.2)
+(i)kf(i+ 1)   2f(i) + f(i  1)k
2
=h
4
;
where his the step size, whichcan be neglected if we resample the curve alongits arc-length
after each iteration.
In addition to this internal spline energy, a snake simultaneously minimizes external
image-based and constraint-based potentials. The image-based potentials are the sum of sev-
eral terms
E
image
=w
line
E
line
+w
edge
E
edge
+w
term
E
term
;
(5.3)
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
delete page from pdf document; delete page on pdf reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf; delete pdf pages acrobat
5.1 Active contours
271
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.2 Snakes (Kass,Witkin,andTerzopoulos1988)
c
1988 Springer: (a) the “snake
pit” for interactively controlling shape; (b) lip tracking.
where the line term attracts the snake to dark ridges, the edge term attracts it to strong gradi-
ents (edges), and the term term attracts it to line terminations. In practice, most systems only
use the edge term, which can either be directly proportional to the image gradients,
E
edge
=
X
i
krI(f(i))k
2
;
(5.4)
or to a smoothed versionof the image Laplacian,
E
edge
=
X
i
j(G
r
2
I)(f(i))j
2
:
(5.5)
People alsosometimes extractedges andthen use a distance mapto theedgesas analternative
to these two originally proposed potentials.
In interactive applications, a variety of user-placed constraints can also be added, e.g.,
attractive (spring) forces towards anchor points d(i),
E
spring
=k
i
kf(i)   d(i)k
2
;
(5.6)
as well as repulsive 1=r (“volcano”) forces (Figure5.2a). As the snakes evolve by minimiz-
ing their energy, they often “wiggle” and “slither”, which accounts for their popular name.
Figure5.2b shows snakes being used to track a person’s lips.
Because regular snakes have a tendency to shrink (Exercise5.1), it is usually better to
initialize them by drawing the snake outside the object of interest to be tracked. Alterna-
tively, an expansionballooning force canbe added to the dynamics (CohenandCohen1993),
essentially moving each point outwards along its normal.
To efficiently solve the sparse linear system arising from snake energy minimization, a
sparse direct solver (AppendixA.4) can be used, since the linear system is essentially penta-
diagonal.4 Snake evolution is usually implemented as an alternation between this linear sys-
4
Aclosed snake hasa Toeplitzmatrixform,which can still be factored and solved in O(N) time.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages pdf online; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages of pdf; cut pages from pdf
272
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 5.3 Elastic net: The open squares indicate the cities andthe closed squares linked by
straight line segments are the tour points. The blue circles indicate the approximate extent of
the attraction forceof eachcity, whichisreducedover time. Under theBayesianinterpretation
of theelastic net, the bluecirclescorrespondtoone standarddeviationof thecircular Gaussian
that generates each city from some unknown tour point.
tem solutionandthe linearization of non-linear constraints suchas edgeenergy. Amore direct
way to find a global energy minimum is to use dynamic programming (Amini,Weymouth,
and Jain 1990; Williams and Shah 1992),butthisisnotoftenusedinpractice,sinceithas
been superseded by even more efficient or interactive algorithms such as intelligent scissors
(Section5.1.3) and GrabCut (Section5.5).
Elastic nets and slippery springs
An interesting variant on snakes, first proposed byDurbinandWillshaw (1987) and later
re-formulated in an energy-minimizing framework byDurbin,Szeliski,andYuille(1989), is
the elastic net formulation of the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Recall that in a TSP,
the salesman must visit eachcityonce while minimizingthetotal distance traversed. A snake
that is constrainedto pass througheach city couldsolve this problem (without anyoptimality
guarantees) but it is impossible to tell ahead of time which snake control point should be
associated with each city.
Instead of having a fixed constraint between snake nodes and cities, as in (5.6), a city is
assumed to pass near some point along the tour (Figure5.3). In a probabilistic interpretation,
each city is generated as a mixture of Gaussians centered at each tour point,
p(d(j)) =
X
i
p
ij
with p
ij
=e
d
2
ij
=(2
2
)
(5.7)
where  is the standard deviation of the Gaussian and
d
ij
=kf(i)   d(j)k
(5.8)
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pdf pages in reader; copy pages from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf reader
5.1 Active contours
273
is the Euclidean distance between a tour pointf(i) and a city location d(j). The correspond-
ing data fitting energy (negative log likelihood) is
E
slippery
X
j
logp(d(j)) =  
X
j
log
h
X
e
k
f
(i) 
d
(j)k
2
=2
2
i
:
(5.9)
This energy derives its name from the fact that, unlike a regular spring, which couples a
given snake point to a given constraint (5.6), this alternative energy defines a slippery spring
that allows the association between constraints (cities) and curve (tour) points to evolve over
time (Szeliski1989). Note that this is a soft variant of the popular iterated closest point
data constraint that is often used in fitting or aligning surfaces to data points or to each other
(Section12.2.1) (BeslandMcKay1992;Zhang1994).
To compute a good solution to the TSP, the slippery spring data association energy is
combined with a regular first-order internal smoothness energy (5.3) to define the cost of a
tour. The tour f(s) is initialized as a small circle around the mean of the city points and  is
progressively lowered (Figure5.3). For large  values, the tour tries to stay near the centroid
of the points but as  decreases each city pulls more and more strongly on its closest tour
points (Durbin,Szeliski,andYuille1989). In the limit as  ! 0, each city is guaranteed to
capture at least one tour point and the tours between subsequent cites become straight lines.
Splines and shape priors
While snakes can be very good at capturing the fine and irregular detail in many real-world
contours, they sometimes exhibit too many degrees of freedom, making it more likely that
they can get trappedin local minima during their evolution.
One solutiontothis problem istocontrol the snakewith fewer degrees of freedom through
the use of B-spline approximations (Menet,Saint-Marc,andMedioni1990b,a;Cipollaand
Blake 1990).TheresultingB-snakecanbewrittenas
f(s) =
X
k
B
k
(s)x
k
(5.10)
or in discrete form as
F = BX
(5.11)
with
F =
2
6
6
4
f
T
(0)
.
.
.
f
T
(N)
3
7
7
5
; B =
2
6
6
6
4
B
0
(s
0
) ::: B
K
(s
0
)
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
B
0
(s
N
) ::: B
K
(s
N
)
3
7
7
7
5
; and X =
2
6
6
4
xT (0)
.
.
.
x
T
(K)
3
7
7
5
:
(5.12)
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages. Demo
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page in pdf preview
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
delete page from pdf; delete a page from a pdf online
274
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 5.4 Point distribution model for a set of resistors (Cootes, Cooper, Tayloretal.
1995)
c
1995 Elsevier: (a) set of input resistor shapes; (b) assignment of control points
to the boundary; (c) distribution (scatter plot) of point locations; (d) first (largest) mode of
variation in the ensemble shapes.
If the object being tracked or recognized has large variations in location, scale, or ori-
entation, these can be modeled as an additional transformation on the control points, e.g.,
x
0
k
=sRx
k
+t (2.18), which can be estimated at the same time as the values of the control
points. Alternatively, separate detection and alignment stages can be run to first localize and
orient the objects of interest (Cootes,Cooper,Tayloretal.1995).
In a B-snake, because the snake is controlled by fewer degrees of freedom, there is less
need for the internal smoothness forces used with the original snakes, although these can still
bederivedandimplementedusing finite element analysis, i.e., taking derivatives andintegrals
of the B-spline basis functions (Terzopoulos1983;Bathe2007).
In practice, it is more common toestimate a setof shape priors onthe typical distribution
of the control points fx
k
g(Cootes,Cooper,Tayloretal.1995). Consider the set of resistor
shapes shown in Figure5.4a. If we describe each contour with the set of control points
shown in Figure5.4b, we can plot the distribution of each point in a scatter plot, as shown in
Figure5.4c.
One potential way of describing this distribution would be by the location x
k
and 2D
covariance C
k
of each individual point x
k
. These could then be turned into a quadratic
penalty (prior energy) on the point location,
E
loc
(x
k
)=
1
2
(x
k
x
k
)
T
C
1
k
(x
k
x
k
):
(5.13)
In practice, however, the variation inpoint locations is usually highly correlated.
Apreferable approach is to estimate the joint covariance of all the points simultaneously.
First, concatenate all of the point locations fx
k
ginto a single vector x, e.g., by interleaving
the x and y locations of each point. The distribution of these vectors across all training
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF Viewer, such as rotate PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page.
delete pages on pdf online; delete blank page in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
delete pages out of a pdf; delete page pdf online
5.1 Active contours
275
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.5 Active Shape Model (ASM): (a) the effect of varying the first four shape param-
eters for a set of faces (Cootes,Taylor,Lanitisetal.1993)
c
1993 IEEE; (b) searching for
the strongest gradient along the normal to each control point (Cootes,Cooper,Tayloretal.
1995) c 1995Elsevier.
examples (Figure5.4a) can be described with a mean x and a covariance
C=
1
P
X
p
(x
p
x)(x
p
x)
T
;
(5.14)
wherex
p
arethe P trainingexamples. Usingeigenvalue analysis (AppendixA.1.2), whichis
alsoknown as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) (AppendixB.1.1), thecovariancematrix
can be written as,
C=  diag(
0
:::
K 1
)
T
:
(5.15)
In most cases, the likely appearance of the points can be modeledusingonly a few eigen-
vectors with the largest eigenvalues. The resulting point distribution model (Cootes,Taylor,
Lanitis et al. 1993; Cootes, Cooper, Taylor et al. 1995)canbewrittenas
x= x +
^
b;
(5.16)
where b is an M  K element shape parameter vector and
^
are the first m columns of .
To constrain the shape parameters toreasonable values, we can use a quadratic penalty of the
form
E
shape
=
1
2
b
T
diag(
0
:::
M 1
)b =
X
m
b
2
m
=2
m
:
(5.17)
Alternatively, the range of allowable b
m
values can be limited to some range, e.g., jb
m
j 
3
p
m
(Cootes,Cooper,Tayloretal. 1995). Alternative approaches for deriving a set of
shape vectors are reviewed byIsardandBlake (1998).
276
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Varying the individual shape parameters b
m
over the range  2
p
m
 2
p
m
can give
agood indication of the expected variation in appearance, as shown in Figure5.4d. Another
example, this time related to face contours, is shown in Figure5.5a.
In order to align a point distribution model with an image, each control point searches
in a direction normal to the contour to find the most likely corresponding image edge point
(Figure5.5b). These individual measurements can be combined with priors on the shape
parameters (and, if desired, position, scale, and orientation parameters) to estimate a new set
of parameters. The resulting Active Shape Model (ASM) can be iteratively minimized to fit
images to non-rigidly deforming objects such as medical images or body parts such as hands
(Cootes,Cooper,Tayloretal.1995). The ASMcan alsobe combined witha PCA analysis of
the underlying gray-leveldistributionto create an Active Appearance Model(AAM) (Cootes,
Edwards, andTaylor 2001),whichwediscussinmoredetailinSection14.2.2.
5.1.2 Dynamic snakes and CONDENSATION
In many applications of active contours, the object of interest is being tracked from frame
to frame as it deforms and evolves. In this case, it makes sense to use estimates from the
previous frame to predict and constrain the new estimates.
One waytodothis is touseKalmanfiltering, whichresults inaformulation calledKalman
snakes (TerzopoulosandSzeliski1992;Blake,Curwen,andZisserman1993). The Kalman
filter is based on a linear dynamic model of shape parameter evolution,
x
t
=Ax
t 1
+w
t
;
(5.18)
where x
t
and x
t 1
are the current and previous state variables, A is the linear transition
matrix, and w is a noise (perturbation) vector, which is often modeled as a Gaussian (Gelb
1974). ThematricesAandthenoisecovariancecanbelearnedaheadoftimebyobserving
typical sequences of the object being tracked (BlakeandIsard1998).
The qualitative behavior of the Kalman filter can be seen in Figure5.6a. The linear dy-
namic model causes a deterministic change (drift) in the previous estimate, while the process
noise (perturbation) causes a stochastic diffusion that increases the system entropy (lack of
certainty). New measurements from the current frame restore some of the certainty (peaked-
ness) in the updated estimate.
In many situations, however, such as when tracking in clutter, a better estimate for the
contour can be obtained if we remove the assumptions that the distribution are Gaussian,
which is what the Kalman filter requires. In this case, a general multi-modal distribution is
propagated, as shown inFigure5.6b. In order to model such multi-modal distributions,Isard
and Blake(1998)introducedtheuseofparticlefilteringtothecomputervisioncommunity.
5
5
Alternatives to modeling multi-modal distributions include mixtures of Gaussians (Bishop2006) and multiple
5.1 Active contours
277
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.6 Probability density propagation (IsardandBlake1998 )  c 1998 Springer. At
the beginning of each estimation step, the probability density is updated according to the
linear dynamic model (deterministic drift) and its certainty is reduced due to process noise
(stochastic diffusion). New measurements introduce additional information that helps refine
the current estimate. (a) The Kalmanfilter models the distributions as uni-modal, i.e., using a
mean and covariance. (b) Some applications require more general multi-modal distributions.
278
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.7 Factored sampling using particle filter in the CONDENSATION algorithm (Is-
ard and Blake 1998)
c
1998 Springer: (a) each density distribution is represented using a
superposition of weighted particles; (b) the drift-diffusion-measurement cycle implemented
using random sampling, perturbation, and re-weighting stages.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested