c# pdf reader table : Delete page in pdf preview SDK software service wpf .net azure dnn SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft31-part605

5.3 Meanshift and mode finding
289
with  usually set to 0.2. The intensity and texture similarity statistics for the coarser nodes
are recursively computed using weighted averaging, where the relative strengths (couplings)
between coarse- and fine-level nodes are based on their merge probabilities p
ij
.This allows
the algorithm to run in essentially O(N) time, using the same kind of hierarchical aggrega-
tion operations that are used in pyramid-based filtering or preconditioning algorithms. After
asegmentation has been identified at a coarser level, the exact memberships of eachpixel are
computed by propagating coarse-level assignments to their finer-level “children” (Sharon,
Galun, Sharon et al. 2006; Alpert, Galun, Basri et al. 2007).Figure5.22showsthesegmen-
tations produced by this algorithm compared to other popular segmentation algorithms.
5.3 Mean shift and mode finding
Mean-shift and mode finding techniques, such as k-means and mixtures of Gaussians, model
the feature vectors associated with each pixel (e.g., color and position) as samples from an
unknown probabilitydensityfunctionandthen trytofind clusters (modes) in this distribution.
Consider the color image shown in Figure5.16a. How would you segment this image
based on color alone? Figure5.16b shows the distribution of pixels in L*u*v* space, which
is equivalent to what a vision algorithm that ignores spatial location would see. To make the
visualization simpler, let us only consider the L*u* coordinates, as shown in Figure5.16c.
How many obvious (elongated) clusters do you see? How would you go about finding these
clusters?
The k-means and mixtures of Gaussians techniques use a parametric model of the den-
sity function to answer this question, i.e., they assume the density is the superposition of a
small number of simpler distributions (e.g., Gaussians) whose locations (centers) and shape
(covariance) can be estimated. Mean shift, on the other hand, smoothes the distribution and
finds its peaks as well as the regions of feature space that correspond to each peak. Since
acomplete density is being modeled, this approach is called non-parametric (Bishop2006).
Let us look at these techniques in more detail.
5.3.1 K-means and mixtures of Gaussians
While k-means implicitly models the probability density as a superposition of spherically
symmetric distributions, it does not require any probabilistic reasoning or modeling (Bishop
2006). Instead, , thealgorithm isgiventhenumberofclusters kitissupposedtofind; ; it
then iteratively updates the cluster center location based on the samples that are closest to
each center. The algorithm can be initialized by randomly sampling k centers from the input
feature vectors. Techniques have also been developed for splitting or merging cluster centers
Delete page in pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages pdf files
Delete page in pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page in pdf reader
290
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Figure 5.16 Mean-shift image segmentation (ComaniciuandMeer2002)  c 2002 IEEE:
(a) input color image; (b) pixels plotted in L*u*v* space; (c) L*u* space distribution; (d)
clustered results after 159 mean-shift procedures; (e) corresponding trajectories with peaks
marked as red dots.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
RasterEdge XDoc.Word provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the word document file. You can be able to get a preview of this word
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
XDoc.PowerPoint provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
delete page from pdf online; delete pdf pages in preview
5.3 Meanshift and mode finding
291
based on their statistics, and for accelerating the process of finding the nearest mean center
(Bishop2006).
In mixtures of Gaussians, each cluster center is augmented by a covariance matrix whose
values are re-estimated from the corresponding samples. Instead of using nearest neighbors
to associate input samples with cluster centers, a Mahalanobis distance (AppendixB.1.1) is
used:
d(x
i
;
k
;
k
)= kx
i
k
k
1
k
=(x
i
k
)
T
1
k
(x
i
k
)
(5.26)
where x
i
are the input samples, 
k
are the cluster centers, and 
k
are their covariance es-
timates. Samples can be associated with the nearest cluster center (a hard assignment of
membership) or can be softly assigned to several nearby clusters.
This latter, more commonly used, approach corresponds to iteratively re-estimating the
parameters for a mixture of Gaussians density function,
p(xjf
k
;
k
;
k
g) =
X
k
k
N(xj
k
;
k
);
(5.27)
where 
k
are the mixing coefficients, 
k
and 
k
are the Gaussian means and covariances,
and
N(xj
k
;
k
)=
1
j
k
j
e
d(
x
;
k
;
k
)
(5.28)
is the normal (Gaussian) distribution (Bishop2006).
To iteratively compute (a local) maximum likely estimate for the unknown mixture pa-
rameters f
k
;
k
;
k
g, the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm (Dempster,Laird,and
Rubin 1977)proceedsintwoalternatingstages:
1. The expectationstage (E step) estimates the responsibilities
z
ik
=
1
Z
i
k
N(xj
k
;
k
) with
X
k
z
ik
=1;
(5.29)
which are the estimates of how likely asample x
i
was generated from the kthGaussian
cluster.
2. The maximization stage (M step) updates the parameter values
k
=
1
N
k
X
i
z
ik
x
i
;
(5.30)
k
=
1
N
k
X
i
z
ik
(x
i
k
)(x
i
k
)
T
;
(5.31)
k
=
N
k
N
;
(5.32)
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents: Embedded page thumbnails.
delete blank page from pdf; delete blank pages from pdf file
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
It makes users easy to view PDF document and edit PDF document in preview. PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
delete pages pdf file; acrobat remove pages from pdf
292
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
where
N
k
=
X
i
z
ik
:
(5.33)
is an estimate of the number of sample points assigned to each cluster.
Bishop(2006)hasawonderfulexpositionofbothmixtureofGaussiansestimationandthe
more general topic of expectation maximization.
In the context of image segmentation,Ma,Derksen,Hongetal.(2007) present a nice
review of segmentation using mixtures of Gaussians and develop their own extension based
on Minimum Description Length (MDL) coding, which they show produces good results on
the Berkeleysegmentationdatabase.
5.3.2 Mean shift
Whilek-means andmixturesof Gaussians use aparametric form tomodel the probabilityden-
sity function being segmented, mean shift implicitly models this distribution using a smooth
continuous non-parametric model. The key to mean shift is a technique for efficiently find-
ing peaks in this high-dimensional data distribution without ever computing the complete
function explicitly (FukunagaandHostetler1975;Cheng1995;ComaniciuandMeer2002).
Consider once again the data points shown in Figure5.16c, which can be thought of as
having beendrawn from some probabilitydensity function. If we could compute this density
function, as visualized in Figure5.16e, we could find its major peaks (modes) and identify
regions of the input space that climb to the same peak as being part of the same region. This
is the inverse of the watershed algorithm described in Section5.2.1, which climbs downhill
to find basins of attraction.
The first question, then, is how to estimate the density function given a sparse set of
samples. One of the simplest approaches is to just smooth the data, e.g., by convolving it
with a fixed kernel of width h,
f(x) =
X
i
K(x  x
i
)=
X
i
k
kx  x
i
k
2
h2
;
(5.34)
where x
i
are the input samples and k(r) is the kernel function (or Parzen window).
9
This
approach is known as kerneldensity estimation or the Parzen window technique (Duda,Hart,
and Stork 2001,Section4.3; Bishop 2006,Section2.5.1).Oncewehavecomputedf(x),as
shown in Figures5.16e and5.17, we canfind its local maxima using gradient ascent or some
other optimization technique.
9
In this simplified formula, a Euclidean metric is used. We discuss a little later (5.42) how to generalize this
to non-uniform (scaled or oriented) metrics. Note also that this distribution may not be proper,i.e., integrate to 1.
Sincewearelooking formaximain the density,this does notmatter.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pdf pages android
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
delete pages pdf preview; delete pages from a pdf online
5.3 Meanshift and mode finding
293
x
(x)
x
i
K(x)
G(x)
f '(x
k
)
x
k
m(x
k
)
Figure 5.17 One-dimensionalvisualizationof thekerneldensity estimate, its derivative, and
amean shift. The kernel density estimate f(x) is obtained by convolving the sparse set of
input samples x
i
with the kernel function K(x). The derivative of this function, f
0
(x), can
be obtained by convolving the inputs with the derivative kernel G(x). Estimating the local
displacement vectors around a current estimate x
k
results in the mean-shift vector m(x
k
),
which, in a multi-dimensional setting, point in the same direction as the function gradient
rf(x
k
). The red dots indicate local maxima in f(x) to which the mean shifts converge.
The problem with this “brute force” approach is that, for higher dimensions, it becomes
computationallyprohibitive to evaluate f(x) over the completesearchspace.
10
Instead, mean
shift uses avariant of what is known in the optimization literature as multiple restart gradient
descent. Starting at some guess for a local maximum, y
k
,which can be a random input data
point x
i
,mean shift computes the gradient of the density estimate f(x) at y
k
and takes an
uphill step in that direction(Figure5.17). The gradient of f(x) is given by
rf(x) =
X
i
(x
i
x)G(x   x
i
)=
X
i
(x
i
x)g
kx   x
i
k2
h2
;
(5.35)
where
g(r) =  k
0
(r);
(5.36)
and k
0
(r) is the first derivative of k(r). We can re-write the gradient of the density function
as
rf(x) =
"
X
i
G(x   x
i
)
#
m(x);
(5.37)
where the vector
m(x) =
P
i
x
i
G(x   x
i
)
P
i
G(x   x
i
)
x
(5.38)
is called the mean shift, since it is the difference betweenthe weightedmean of the neighbors
x
i
around x and the current value of x.
10
Even foronedimension, ifthe space is extremely sparse,it may be inefficient.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; add and remove pages from a pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage. a specific image from PDF document page in VB Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
delete pages from a pdf document; delete pdf pages reader
294
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
In the mean-shiftprocedure, the current estimate of the mode y
k
at iteration k is replaced
by its locally weighted mean,
y
k+1
=y
k
+m(y
k
)=
P
i
x
i
G(y
k
x
i
)
P
i
G(y
k
x
i
)
:
(5.39)
Comaniciuand Meer(2002)provethatthisalgorithmconvergestoalocalmaximumoff(x)
under reasonably weak conditions onthe kernelk(r), i.e., that itis monotonically decreasing.
This convergence is not guaranteed for regular gradient descent unless appropriate step size
control is used.
The two kernels thatComaniciuandMeer(2002) studied are the Epanechnikov kernel,
k
E
(r) = max(0;1   r);
(5.40)
which is a radial generalization of a bilinear kernel, and the Gaussian (normal) kernel,
k
N
(r) = exp
1
2
r
:
(5.41)
The corresponding derivative kernels g(r) are a unit ball and another Gaussian, respectively.
Using the Epanechnikov kernel converges in a finite number of steps, while the Gaussian
kernel has a smoother trajectory(and produces better results), but converges very slowly near
amode (Exercise5.5).
The simplest way to apply mean shift is to start a separate mean-shift mode estimate
yat every input point x
i
and to iterate for a fixed number of steps or until the mean-shift
magnitude is below a threshold. A faster approach is to randomly subsample the input points
x
i
and to keep track of each point’s temporal evolution. The remaining points can then be
classified based on the nearest evolution path (ComaniciuandMeer2002).ParisandDurand
(2007) reviewa number of other moreefficientimplementations of meanshift, including their
own approach, which is based on using an efficient low-resolution estimate of the complete
multi-dimensional space of f(x) along with its stationary points.
Thecolor-based segmentationshownin Figure5.16onlylooks atpixelcolors whendeter-
mining the best clustering. It may therefore cluster together small isolated pixels that happen
tohave the same color, whichmaynot correspond toa semantically meaningfulsegmentation
of the image.
Better results can usually be obtained by clustering in the joint domain of color and lo-
cation. In this approach, the spatial coordinates of the image x
s
= (x;y), which are called
the spatial domain, are concatenated with the color values x
r
,which are known as the range
domain, andmean-shift clustering isappliedinthisfive-dimensionalspacex
j
.Sincelocation
andcolor mayhave different scales, the kernels are adjusted accordingly, i.e., we use a kernel
of the form
K(x
j
)= k
kx
r
k
2
h2
r
k
kx
s
k
2
h2
s
;
(5.42)
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
RasterEdge XDoc.Excel provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the Excel document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
cut pages out of pdf file; delete page pdf file reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF class source code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete page in pdf file; delete page from pdf file online
5.3 Meanshift and mode finding
295
Figure 5.18 Mean-shift color image segmentation with parameters (h
s
;h
r
;M) =
(16;19;40) (ComaniciuandMeer2002)
c
2002 IEEE.
where separate parameters h
s
and h
r
are used to control the spatial and range bandwidths of
the filter kernels. Figure5.18 shows an example of mean-shift clustering in the joint domain,
with parameters (h
s
;h
r
;M) = (16;19;40), where spatial regions containing less than M
pixels are eliminated.
The form of thejoint domain filter kernel (5.42) is reminiscentof thebilateral filter kernel
(3.343.37) discussed in Section3.3.1. The difference between mean shift and bilateral fil-
tering, however, is that in mean shift the spatial coordinates of each pixel are adjusted along
with its color values, so that the pixel migrates more quickly towards other pixels withsimilar
colors, and can therefore later be used for clustering and segmentation.
Determining the best bandwidth parameters h to use with mean shift remains something
of an art, although a number of approaches have been explored. These include optimizing
the bias–variance tradeoff, looking for parameter ranges where the number of clusters varies
slowly, optimizing someexternal clustering criterion, or usingtop-down (application domain)
knowledge (ComaniciuandMeer2003). It is also possible to change the orientation of the
kernel in joint parameter space for applications suchas spatio-temporal(video) segmentations
(Wang,Thiesson,Xuetal.2004).
Meanshifthas been applied toa number of differentproblems in computer vision, includ-
ing facetracking, 2Dshape extraction, andtexturesegmentation (ComaniciuandMeer2002),
and more recently in stereo matching (Chapter11) (WeiandQuan2004), non-photorealistic
rendering (Section10.5.2) (DeCarloandSantella2002), and video editing (Section10.4.5)
(Wang,Bhat,Colburnetal.2005). ParisandDurand (2007) provide a nice review of such
applications, as well as techniques for more efficiently solving the mean-shift equations and
producing hierarchical segmentations.
296
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
A
B
sum
A
assoc(A;A)
cut(A;B)
assoc(A;V )
B
cut(B;A)
assoc(B;B)
assoc(B;V )
sum
assoc(A;V )
assoc(B;v)
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.19 Sample weighted graph and its normalized cut: (a) a small sample graph and
its smallest normalized cut; (b) tabular form of the associations and cuts for this graph. The
assoc and cut entries are computed as area sums of the associated weight matrix W (Fig-
ure5.20). Normalizing the table entries by the row or column sums produces normalized
associations and cuts Nassoc and Ncut.
5.4 Normalized cuts
While bottom-up merging techniques aggregate regions into coherent wholes and mean-shift
techniques try to find clusters of similar pixels using mode finding, the normalized cuts
technique introduced byShiandMalik (2000) examines the affinities (similarities) between
nearbypixels and tries to separate groups that are connected by weak affinities.
Consider the simple graph shown in Figure5.19a. The pixels in group A are all strongly
connected with high affinities, shown as thick red lines, as are the pixels in group B. The
connections between these two groups, shown as thinner blue lines, are much weaker. A
normalized cut between the two groups, shown as a dashed line, separates them into two
clusters.
The cut between two groups A and B is defined as the sum of all the weights being cut,
cut(A;B) =
X
i2A;j2B
w
ij
;
(5.43)
where the weights between two pixels (or regions) i and j measure their similarity. Using
aminimum cut as a segmentation criterion, however, does not result in reasonable clusters,
since the smallest cuts usually involve isolating a single pixel.
Abetter measure of segmentation is the normalized cut, which is defined as
Ncut(A;B) =
cut(A;B)
assoc(A;V )
+
cut(A;B)
assoc(B;V )
;
(5.44)
where assoc(A;A) =
P
i2A;j2A
w
ij
is the association (sum of all the weights) within a
cluster and assoc(A;V ) = assoc(A;A)+cut(A;B) is the sum of all the weights associated
5.4 Normalized cuts
297
with nodes in A. Figure5.19b shows howthe cuts and associations can be thought of as area
sums in the weight matrix W = [w
ij
], where the entries of the matrix have beenarranged so
that the nodes in A come first and the nodes in B come second. Figure5.20 shows an actual
weight matrix for which these area sums can be computed. Dividing each of these areas by
the corresponding row sum (the rightmost column of Figure5.19b) results in the normalized
cut and association values. These normalized values better reflect the fitness of a particular
segmentation, since they lookfor collections of edges thatare weakrelative to all of the edges
both inside and emanating from a particular region.
Unfortunately, computing the optimal normalized cut is NP-complete. Instead,Shiand
Malik(2000)suggestcomputingareal-valuedassignmentofnodestogroups. Letxbethe
indicator vector where x
i
=+1 iff i 2 A and x
i
= 1 iff i 2 B. Let d = W1 be the row
sums of the symmetric matrix W and D = diag(d) be the corresponding diagonal matrix.
Shi and Malik(2000)showthatminimizingthenormalizedcutoverallpossibleindicator
vectors x is equivalent to minimizing
min
y
y
T
(D   W)y
yTDy
;
(5.45)
wherey = ((1+x) b(1 x))=2 is avector consistingof all1s and bs suchthatyd = 0.
Minimizing this Rayleigh quotient is equivalent to solvingthe generalized eigenvalue system
(D   W)y = Dy;
(5.46)
which can be turned into a regular eigenvalue problem
(I   N)z = z;
(5.47)
where N = D
1=2
WD
1=2
is the normalized affinity matrix (Weiss 1999) and z =
D
1=2
y. Because these eigenvectors can be interpreted as the large modes of vibration in
aspring-mass system, normalizedcuts is anexample of a spectral method for image segmen-
tation.
Extendinganidea originallyproposedbyScottandLonguet-Higgins(1990),Weiss(1999)
suggests normalizing the affinitymatrix and thenusing the topk eigenvectorstoreconstitutea
Qmatrix. Other papers haveextended the basic normalized cuts framework by modifying the
affinity matrix in different ways, finding better discrete solutions to the minimization prob-
lem, or applying multi-scale techniques (Meil˘aandShi2000,2001;Ng,Jordan,andWeiss
2001; Yu and Shi 2003; Cour, B´en´ezit, and Shi 2005; Tolliver and Miller 2006).
Figure5.20b shows the second smallest (real-valued) eigenvector corresponding to the
weight matrix shown in Figure5.20a. (Here, the rows have been permuted to separate the
two groups of variables that belong to the different components of this eigenvector.) Af-
ter this real-valued vector is computed, the variables corresponding to positive and negative
298
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.20 Sample weight table and its second smallest eigenvector (ShiandMalik2000)
c
2000 IEEE: (a) sample 32  32 weight matrix W; (b) eigenvector corresponding to the
second smallest eigenvalue of the generalized eigenvalue problem (D   W)y = Dy.
eigenvector values are associated with the two cut components. This process can be further
repeated to hierarchically subdivide an image, as shown in Figure5.21.
The original algorithm proposedbyShiandMalik (2000) used spatial positionand image
feature differences to compute the pixel-wise affinities,
w
ij
=exp
kF
i
F
j
k
2
2
F
kx
i
x
j
k
2
2
s
;
(5.48)
for pixels within a radius kx
i
x
j
k< r, where F is a feature vector that consists of intensi-
ties, colors, or oriented filter histograms. (Note how (5.48) is the negative exponential of the
joint feature space distance (5.42).)
In subsequent work,Malik,Belongie,Leungetal.(2001) look for intervening contours
between pixels i and j and define an intervening contour weight
w
IC
ij
=1   max
x
2l
ij
p
con
(x);
(5.49)
where l
ij
is the image line joining pixels i and j and p
con
(x) is the probability of an inter-
vening contour perpendicular to this line, which is defined as the negative exponential of the
oriented energy in the perpendicular direction. They multiply these weights with a texton-
based texture similarity metric and use an initial over-segmentation based purely on local
pixel-wise features to re-estimate intervening contours and texture statistics in a region-based
manner. Figure5.22 shows the results of running this improved algorithm on a number of
test images.
Because it requires the solution of large sparse eigenvalue problems, normalized cuts can
be quite slow. Sharon, Galun, Sharonetal. (2006) present a way to accelerate the com-
putation of the normalized cuts using an approach inspired by algebraic multigrid (Brandt
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested