c# pdf reader table : Delete page from pdf Library application class asp.net html .net ajax SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft32-part606

5.4 Normalized cuts
299
Figure 5.21 Normalized cuts segmentation (ShiandMalik2000)  c 2000 IEEE: The input
image and the components returned by the normalized cuts algorithm.
Figure 5.22 Comparative segmentation results (Alpert,Galun,Basrietal.2007)  c 2007
IEEE. “Our method” refers to the probabilistic bottom-up merging algorithm developed by
Alpert et al.
Delete page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages pdf document
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf preview; delete pages of pdf online
300
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
1986; Briggs, Henson, and McCormick 2000). Tocoarsentheoriginalproblem,theyselect
asmaller number of variables such that the remaining fine-level variables are strongly cou-
pled to atleast one coarse-level variable. Figure5.15 shows this process schematically, while
(5.25) gives the definition for strong coupling except that, in this case, the original weights
w
ij
in the normalizedcut are used instead of merge probabilities p
ij
.
Once a set of coarse variables has been selected, an inter-level interpolation matrix with
elements similar to the left hand side of (5.25) is used to define a reduced version of the nor-
malized cuts problem. In addition to computing the weight matrix using interpolation-based
coarsening, additional region statistics are used to modulate the weights. After a normalized
cut has been computed at the coarsest level of analysis, the membership values of finer-level
nodes are computed by interpolating parent values and mapping values within  = 0:1 of 0
and 1to pure Boolean values.
An example of the segmentation produced by weighted aggregation (SWA) is shown in
Figure5.22, along withthe most recentprobabilistic bottom-up merging algorithm byAlpert,
Galun, Basri et al.(2007),whichwasdescribedinSection5.2. Inevenmorerecentwork,
Wang and Oliensis(2010)showhowtoestimatestatisticsoversegmentations(e.g.,mean
region size) directly from the affinity graph. They use this to produce segmentations that are
more central with respect to other possible segmentations.
5.5 Graph cuts and energy-based methods
Acommon theme in image segmentation algorithms is the desire to group pixels that have
similar appearance (statistics) and to have the boundaries between pixels in different regions
beof shortlengthandacross visiblediscontinuities. If we restricttheboundarymeasurements
to be between immediate neighbors and compute region membership statistics by summing
over pixels, we can formulate this as a classic pixel-based energy function using either a
variational formulation (regularization, see Section3.7.1) or as a binary Markov random
field (Section3.7.2).
Examples of the continuous approach include (MumfordandShah1989;ChanandVese
1992; Zhu and Yuille 1996; Tabb and Ahuja 1997)alongwiththelevelsetapproachesdis-
cussed in Section5.1.4. An early example of a discrete labeling problem that combines
both region-basedand boundary-based energy terms is the workofLeclerc(1989), who used
minimum description length (MDL) coding to derive the energy function being minimized.
Boykov and Funka-Lea(2006)presentawonderfulsurveyofvarious energy-basedtech-
niques for binary object segmentation, some of which we discuss below.
As we saw in Section3.7.2, the energy corresponding to a segmentation problem can be
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from a pdf reader; cut pages out of pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete blank page in pdf online; delete blank page in pdf
5.5 Graph cuts and energy-based methods
301
written (c.f. Equations (3.100) and (3.1083.113)) as
E(f) =
X
i;j
E
r
(i;j) + E
b
(i;j);
(5.50)
where the region term
E
r
(i;j) = E
S
(I(i;j);R(f(i;j)))
(5.51)
is the negative loglikelihood that pixelintensity(or color) I(i;j) is consistentwith the statis-
tics of region R(f(i;j)) and the boundary term
E
b
(i;j) = s
x
(i;j)(f(i;j)   f(i + 1;j)) + s
y
(i;j)(f(i;j)   f(i;j + 1))
(5.52)
measures the inconsistency between N
4
neighbors modulatedby localhorizontalandvertical
smoothness terms s
x
(i;j) and s
y
(i;j).
Region statistics can be something as simple as the mean gray level or color (Leclerc
1989),inwhichcase
E
S
(I;
k
)= kI   
k
k
2
:
(5.53)
Alternatively, they can be more complex, such as region intensity histograms (Boykovand
Jolly 2001)orcolorGaussianmixturemodels(Rother, Kolmogorov, and Blake 2004). For
smoothness (boundary) terms, it is common to make the strength of the smoothness s
x
(i;j)
inversely proportional to the local edge strength (Boykov,Veksler,andZabih2001).
Originally, energy-based segmentation problems were optimized using iterative gradient
descent techniques, which were slow and prone to getting trapped in local minima.Boykov
andJolly(2001)werethefirsttoapplythebinaryMRFoptimizationalgorithmdevelopedby
Greig, Porteous, and Seheult(1989)tobinaryobjectsegmentation.
In this approach, the user first delineates pixels in the background andforeground regions
using a few strokes of an image brush (Figure3.61). These pixels then become the seeds that
tie nodes in the S–T graph to the source and sink labels S and T (Figure5.23a). Seed pixels
can also be used to estimate foreground and background region statistics (intensity or color
histograms).
The capacities of the other edges in the graph are derived from the region and boundary
energy terms, i.e., pixels that are more compatible with the foreground or background region
getstronger connections tothe respectivesource or sink; adjacent pixels with greater smooth-
ness also get stronger links. Once the minimum-cut/maximum-flow problem has been solved
using a polynomial time algorithm (GoldbergandTarjan1988;BoykovandKolmogorov
2004),pixelsoneithersideofthecomputedcutarelabeledaccordingtothesourceorsinkto
which they remain connected (Figure5.23b). While graph cuts is just one of several known
techniques for MRF energy minimization(AppendixB.5.4), it is stilltheonemostcommonly
used for solving binary MRF problems.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages of pdf online; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cut pages from pdf online; delete page in pdf online
302
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Object
terminal
terminal
Background 
p
q
r
w
v
S
T
Background 
Object
terminal
terminal
p
q
r
w
v
S
T
cut
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.23 Graphcuts for region segmentation(BoykovandJolly2001)  c 2001 IEEE:(a)
the energyfunctionis encoded as a maximum flow problem; (b) the minimum cut determines
the region boundary.
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 5.24 GrabCut image segmentation (Rother,Kolmogorov,andBlake2004)
c
2004
ACM: (a) the user draws a bounding boxin red; (b) the algorithm guesses color distributions
for theobject and backgroundandperforms a binary segmentation; (c) the process is repeated
with better region statistics.
The basic binary segmentation algorithm ofBoykovandJolly(2001) has been extended
in a number of directions. The GrabCut system ofRother,Kolmogorov,andBlake(2004)
iteratively re-estimates the region statistics, which are modeled as a mixtures of Gaussians in
color space. This allows their system to operate given minimal user input, such as a single
boundingbox (Figure5.24a)—the backgroundcolor modelis initialized from a strip of pixels
around the box outline. (The foreground color model is initialized from the interior pixels,
but quickly converges to a better estimate of the object.) The user can also place additional
strokes to refine the segmentation as the solution progresses. Inmore recent work,Cui,Yang,
Wen et al.(2008)usecolorandedgemodelsderivedfromprevioussegmentationsofsimilar
objects to improve the local models used in GrabCut.
Another major extensiontothe originalbinary segmentationformulationis the additionof
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages on pdf online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages on pdf file; add and remove pages from a pdf
5.5 Graph cuts and energy-based methods
303
122
Boykovand Funka-Lea
Figure7. Segmentationviacutsonadirectedgraph.Comparetheresultsonanundirectedgraph(c)withtheresultsonadirectedgraphin(d).
Assumenowthatanoptimalsegmentationis already
computed for some initial set ofseeds. A user adds a
new “object” seed to pixel p that was not previously
assignedany seed.Weneed tochangethecosts fortwo
t-links atp
t-link
initial cost new cost
{
p
,
S
} λ
R
p
(“bkg”)
K
{
p
,
T
} λ
R
p
(“obj”)
0
andthencomputethemaximumflow(minimumcut)on
thenewgraph.In fact,wecan start from theflowfound
at the end of initial computation. The only problem is
that reassignment of edge weights as above reduces
capacities of some edges. If there is a flow through
such an edge then we may break theflow consistency.
Increasingan edgecapacity,on theotherhand,isnever
aproblem.Then,wecansolve theproblem as follows.
To accommodate the new “object” seed at pixel p
weincreasethet-links weights according to thetable
t-link
initial cost
add
newcost
{
p
,
S
} λ
R
p
(“bkg”) K
R
p
(“obj”)
K
+
c
p
{
p
,
T
} λ
R
p
(“obj”)
λ
R
p
(“bkg”)
c
p
These new costs are consistent with the edge weight
tableforpixels in
O
sincethe extra constantc
p
atboth
t-links of a pixel does not change the optimal cut.
13
Then,amaximum flow(minimumcut)on anewgraph
can be efficiently obtained starting from the previ-
ousflow withoutrecomputing thewholesolution from
scratch.
Note that the same trick can be done to adjust the
segmentation when anew “background”seed is added
or when a seed is deleted. One has to figure the right
amounts that have to be added to the costs of two
t-linksatthecorrespondingpixel.Thenewcostsshould
be consistent with the edge weight table plus orminus
the same constant.
2.7. Using Directed Edges
Forsimplicity,we previously concentrated on thecase
ofundirected graphs as in Fig. 3.In fact, the majority
ofs-tcut algorithms from combinatorial optimization
can be applied todirected graphs as well. Figure 7(a)
gives one exampleofsuch a graph where each pair of
neighboring nodes is connected by two directed edges
(p
,
q)and(q
,
p)withdistinctweights
w
(p
,
q)
and
w
(q
,
p)
.
Ifacutseparates two neighboringnodespandq sothat
pisconnectedtothesourcewhile qisconnectedtothe
sink then thecostofthecutincludes
w
(p
,
q)
while
w
(q
,
p)
is ignored. Vise versa, ifq is connected to the source
andp to the sink then the cost of the cut includesonly
w
(q
,
p)
.
In certain cases one can take advantage of such di-
rected coststoobtain moreaccurate objectboundaries.
Forexample,comparetwosegmentations inFig.7(c,d)
obtained on amedical image in (b) using thesame set
of constraints.A relatively bright object of interest on
theright(liver)is separated from asmallbrightblob on
Figure 5.25 Segmentationwith a directedgraphcut(BoykovandFunka-Lea2006)  c 2006
Springer: (a) directed graph; (b) image with seed points; (c) the undirected graph incorrectly
continues the boundary along the bright object; (d) the directed graph correctly segments the
light gray region from its darker surround.
directed edges, whichallows boundaryregions tobe oriented, e.g., to prefer lightto darktran-
sitions or vice versa (KolmogorovandBoykov2005). Figure5.25 shows an example where
the directed graphcutcorrectlysegments the light gray liver from its darkgray surround. The
same approach can be used to measure the flux exiting a region, i.e., the signed gradient pro-
jected normal to the region boundary. Combining oriented graphs with larger neighborhoods
enables approximating continuous problems suchas those traditionallysolved usinglevelsets
in the globally optimal graph cut framework (BoykovandKolmogorov2003;Kolmogorov
and Boykov 2005).
Even more recent developments in graph cut-based segmentation techniques include the
addition of connectivity priors to force the foreground to be in a single piece (Vicente,Kol-
mogorov, andRother 2008)andshapepriorstouseknowledgeaboutanobject’sshapeduring
the segmentationprocess (LempitskyandBoykov2007;Lempitsky,Blake,andRother2008).
While optimizing the binary MRF energy (5.50) requires the use of combinatorial op-
timization techniques, such as maximum flow, an approximate solution can be obtained by
converting the binary energy terms into quadratic energy terms defined over a continuous
[0;1] random field, which then becomes a classical membrane-based regularization problem
(3.1003.102). The resulting quadratic energy function can then be solved using standard
linear system solvers (3.1023.103), although if speed is an issue, you should use multigrid
or one of its variants (AppendixA.5). Once the continuous solution has been computed, it
can be thresholded at 0.5 to yield a binary segmentation.
The[0;1] continuous optimizationproblem canalso be interpretedas computingtheprob-
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete blank page from pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete page from pdf
304
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
ability at each pixel that a random walker starting at that pixel ends up at one of the labeled
seed pixels, which is also equivalent to computing the potential in a resistive grid where the
resistors are equal to the edge weights (Grady2006;SinopandGrady2007). K-way seg-
mentations can alsobe computedby iterating through the seedlabels, using a binary problem
with one label set to 1 and all the others set to 0 to compute the relative membership proba-
bilities for each pixel. In follow-on work,GradyandAli(2008) use a precomputation of the
eigenvectors of the linear system to make the solution with a novel set of seeds faster, which
is related to the Laplacian matting problem presented in Section10.4.3 (Levin, Acha,and
Lischinski 2008). Couprie, Grady, Najman et al.(2009)relatetherandomwalkertowater-
sheds and other segmentation techniques. Singaraju,Grady,andVidal(2008) add directed-
edge constraints in order to support flux, which makes the energy piecewise quadratic and
hence not solvable as a single linear system. The random walker algorithm can also be used
to solve the Mumford–Shah segmentation problem (GradyandAlvino2008) and to com-
pute fast multigrid solutions (Grady2008). A nice review of these techniques is given by
Singaraju, Grady, Sinop et al.(2010).
An even faster way to compute a continuous [0;1] approximate segmentation is to com-
pute weighted geodesic distances between the 0 and 1 seed regions (BaiandSapiro2009),
which can also be used to estimate soft alpha mattes (Section10.4.3). A related approach by
Criminisi, Sharp, and Blake(2008)canbeusedtofindfastapproximatesolutionstogeneral
binary Markov random field optimization problems.
5.5.1 Application: Medical image segmentation
One of the most promising applications of image segmentation is in the medical imaging
domain, where it can be used to segment anatomical tissues for later quantitative analysis.
Figure5.25 shows a binary graph cut with directed edges being used to segment the liver tis-
sue (light gray) from its surrounding bone (white) and muscle (dark gray) tissue. Figure5.26
shows the segmentation of bones in a 256  256  119 computed X-ray tomography (CT)
volume. Without the powerful optimization techniques available in today’s image segmen-
tation algorithms, such processing used to require much more laborious manual tracing of
individual X-ray slices.
The fields of medical image segmentation (McInerneyandTerzopoulos1996) and med-
ical image registration (KybicandUnser2003) (Section8.3.1) are rich research fields with
their own specialized conferences, such as Medical Imaging Computing and Computer As-
sisted Intervention (MICCAI),
11
and journals, such as Medical Image Analysis and IEEE
Transactions on Medical Imaging. These can be great sources of references and ideas for
research in this area.
11
http://www.miccai.org/.
5.6 Additional reading
305
(a)
(b)
Figure 5.26 3D volumetric medical image segmentation using graph cuts (Boykovand
Funka-Lea 2006)
c
2006 Springer: (a) computed tomography (CT) slice with some seeds;
(b) recovered 3D volumetric bone model (on a 256  256 119 voxel grid).
5.6 Additional reading
The topic of image segmentation is closely related to clustering techniques, which are treated
inanumber of monographs andreviewarticles (JainandDubes1988;KaufmanandRousseeuw
1990; Jain, Duin, and Mao 2000; Jain, Topchy, Law et al. 2004). Someearlysegmentation
techniques include those describerd byBriceandFennema(1970);Pavlidis(1977);Riseman
andArbib(1977); Ohlander, Price, andReddy(1978); Rosenfeld and Davis(1979); Haralick
and Shapiro(1985),whileexamplesofnewertechniquesaredevelopedby Leclerc(1989);
Mumford and Shah(1989); Shi and Malik(2000); Felzenszwalb and Huttenlocher(2004b).
Arbel´aez, Maire, Fowlkes et al.(2010)provideagoodreviewofautomaticsegmentation
techniques and also compare their performance on the Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and
Benchmark(Martin,Fowlkes,Taletal.2001).
12
Additionalcomparison papers anddatabases
include those byUnnikrishnan, Pantofaru, andHebert(2007);Alpert, Galun, Basrietal.
(2007);EstradaandJepson(2009).
The topic of active contours has a long history, beginning with the seminal work on
snakes and other energy-minimizing variational methods (Kass, Witkin, andTerzopoulos
1988; Cootes, Cooper, Taylor et al. 1995; Blake and Isard 1998),continuingthroughtech-
niques such as intelligent scissors (MortensenandBarrett1995,1999;P´erez, Blake, and
Gangnet 2001),andculminatinginlevelsets(Malladi, Sethian, and Vemuri 1995; Caselles,
Kimmel, and Sapiro 1997; Sethian 1999; Paragios andDeriche 2000;Sapiro 2001;Osher and
Paragios 2003; Paragios, Faugeras, Chan et al. 2005; Cremers, Rousson, and Deriche 2007;
Rousson andParagios 2008; Paragios andSgallari2009),whicharecurrentlythemostwidely
12
http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/Projects/CS/vision/grouping/segbench/.
306
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
used active contour methods.
Techniques for segmenting images based on local pixel similarities combined with ag-
gregation or splitting methods include watersheds (VincentandSoille1991;Beare2006;
Arbel
´
aez, Maire, Fowlkes et al. 2010),regionsplitting(Ohlander, Price, and Reddy 1978),
region merging (BriceandFennema1970;PavlidisandLiow1990;Jain,Topchy,Lawetal.
2004),aswellasgraph-basedandprobabilisticmulti-scaleapproaches(Felzenszwalb and
Huttenlocher 2004b; Alpert, Galun, Basri et al. 2007).
Mean-shift algorithms, which find modes (peaks) in a density function representation of
the pixels, arepresented byComaniciuandMeer(2002);ParisandDurand(2007). Parametric
mixtures of Gaussians can alsobe usedto representand segment such pixeldensities (Bishop
2006; Ma, Derksen, Hong et al. 2007).
The seminal work on spectral (eigenvalue) methods for image segmentation is the nor-
malized cut algorithm ofShiandMalik (2000). Related work includes that byWeiss(1999);
Meil˘a and Shi(2000, 2001); Malik, Belongie, Leung et al.(2001); Ng, Jordan, and Weiss
(2001);YuandShi(2003);Cour, B´en´ezit, andShi(2005);Sharon, Galun, Sharonetal.
(2006);TolliverandMiller(2006);WangandOliensis(2010).
Continuous-energy-based(variational) approaches tointeractive segmentationincludeLeclerc
(1989);MumfordandShah(1989);ChanandVese(1992);ZhuandYuille(1996);Tabband
Ahuja(1997). Discretevariantsofsuchproblemsareusuallyoptimizedusingbinarygraph
cuts or other combinatorial energy minimization methods (BoykovandJolly2001;Boykov
andKolmogorov2003;Rother, Kolmogorov, andBlake2004;Kolmogorovand Boykov2005;
Cui, Yang, Wen et al. 2008; Vicente, Kolmogorov, and Rother 2008; Lempitsky and Boykov
2007;Lempitsky, Blake, and Rother 2008),althoughcontinuousoptimizationtechniquesfol-
lowed by thresholding canalso be used (Grady2006;GradyandAli2008;Singaraju,Grady,
and Vidal 2008; Criminisi, Sharp, and Blake 2008; Grady 2008; Bai and Sapiro 2009; Cou-
prie, Grady, Najman et al. 2009). Boykov and Funka-Lea(2006)presentagoodsurveyof
various energy-based techniques for binary object segmentation.
5.7 Exercises
Ex 5.1: Snake evolution Prove that, in the absence of external forces, a snake will always
shrink to a small circle and eventually a single point, regardless of whether first- or second-
order smoothness (or some combination) is used.
(Hint: If you can show that the evolution of the x(s) and y(s) components are indepen-
dent, you can analyze the 1D case more easily.)
Ex 5.2: Snake tracker Implement a snake-based contour tracker:
5.7 Exercises
307
1. Decide whether to use a large number of contour points or a smaller number interpo-
lated with a B-spline.
2. Define your internal smoothness energy function and decide what image-based attrac-
tive forces to use.
3. At each iteration, set up the banded linear system of equations (quadratic energy func-
tion) and solve it using banded Cholesky factorization (AppendixA.4).
Ex 5.3: Intelligent scissors Implement the intelligent scissors (live-wire) interactive seg-
mentation algorithm (MortensenandBarrett1995) and design a graphical user interface
(GUI) to let you draw such curves over an image and use them for segmentation.
Ex 5.4: Region segmentation Implement one of the region segmentation algorithms de-
scribed in this chapter. Some popular segmentation algorithms include:
 k-means (Section5.3.1);
 mixtures of Gaussians (Section5.3.1);
 mean shift (Section5.3.2) and Exercise5.5;
 normalized cuts (Section5.4);
 similarity graph-based segmentation (Section5.2.4);
 binaryMarkov random fields solved using graph cuts (Section5.5).
Apply your region segmentation to a video sequence and use it to track moving regions
from frame to frame.
Alternatively, test outyour segmentationalgorithm onthe Berkeleysegmentationdatabase
(Martin,Fowlkes,Taletal.2001).
Ex 5.5: Mean shift Develop a mean-shift segmentation algorithm for color images (Co-
maniciu and Meer 2002).
1. Convert your image to L*a*b* space, or keep the original RGB colors, and augment
them with the pixel (x;y) locations.
2. For every pixel (L;a;b;x;y), compute the weighted mean of its neighbors using either
aunit ball (Epanechnikov kernel) or finite-radius Gaussian, or some other kernel of
your choosing. Weight the color and spatial scales differently, e.g., using values of
(h
s
;h
r
;M) = (16;19;40) as shown in Figure5.18.
308
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
3. Replace the current value with this weighted mean and iterate until either the motion is
below a threshold or a finite number of steps has beentaken.
4. Cluster all final values (modes) that are within a threshold, i.e., find the connected
components. Since each pixel is associated with a final mean-shift (mode) value, this
results in an image segmentation, i.e., each pixel is labeled with its final component.
5. (Optional) Use a random subset of the pixels as starting points and find which com-
ponent each unlabeled pixel belongs to, either by finding its nearest neighbor or by
iteratingthe meanshift untilit finds a neighboring track of mean-shift values. Describe
the data structures you use to make this efficient.
6. (Optional) Mean shift divides the kernel density function estimate by the local weight-
ing to obtain a step size that is guaranteed to converge but may be slow. Use an alter-
native step size estimation algorithm from the optimization literature to see if you can
make the algorithm converge faster.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested