c# pdf reader table : Delete pdf pages in preview SDK control API .net azure html sharepoint SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft34-part608

6.1 2Dand 3D feature-based alignment
319
then used to computean initialestimatefor p. Theresiduals of the fullset of correspondences
are then computed as
r
i
=~x
0
i
(x
i
;p)   ^x
0
i
;
(6.28)
where
~
x
0
i
are the estimated (mapped) locations and
^
x
0
i
are the sensed (detected) feature point
locations.
The RANSAC technique then counts the number of inliers that are within  of their pre-
dicted location, i.e., whose kr
i
k  . (The  value is application dependent but is often
around 1–3 pixels.) Least median of squares finds the median value of the kr
i
k
2
values. The
random selection process is repeated S times and the sample set with the largest number of
inliers (or with the smallest median residual) is kept as the final solution. Either the initial
parameter guess p or the full set of computed inliers is then passed on to the next data fitting
stage.
When the number of measurements is quite large, it may be preferable to only score a
subset of the measurements in an initial round that selects the most plausible hypotheses for
additional scoring and selection. This modification of RANSAC, which can significantly
speed up its performance, is called Preemptive RANSAC (Nist
´
er 2003). Inanothervariant
on RANSAC called PROSAC (PROgressive SAmple Consensus), random samples are ini-
tially added from the most “confident” matches, thereby speeding up the process of finding a
(statistically) likely good set of inliers (ChumandMatas2005).
To ensure that the random sampling has a good chance of finding a true set of inliers, a
sufficient number of trials S must be tried. Let p be the probability that any given correspon-
dence is valid and P be the total probability of success after S trials. The likelihood in one
trial that all k random samples are inliers is p
k
. Therefore, the likelihood that S such trials
will all fail is
1  P = (1  p
k
)
S
(6.29)
and the required minimum number of trials is
S=
log(1   P)
log(1   pk)
:
(6.30)
Stewart(1999)givesexamplesoftherequirednumberoftrialsStoattaina99%proba-
bility of success. As you can see from Table6.2, the number of trials grows quickly with the
number of sample points used. This provides a strong incentive to use the minimum number
of sample points k possible for any given trial, which is how RANSAC is normally used in
practice.
Uncertainty modeling
In addition to robustly computing a good alignment, some applications require the compu-
tation of uncertainty (see AppendixB.6). For linear problems, this estimate can be obtained
Delete pdf pages in preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page in a pdf file; delete pdf pages ipad
Delete pdf pages in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page from pdf document
320
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
k
p
S
3 0.5
35
6 0.6
97
6 0.5 293
Table 6.2 Number of trials S toattain a 99% probability of success (Stewart1999).
byinverting the Hessianmatrix(6.9) and multiplyingit bythe feature position noise (if these
have not already been used to weight the individual measurements, as in Equations (6.10)
and6.11)). In statistics, the Hessian, whichis the inverse covariance, is sometimes called the
(Fisher) information matrix (AppendixB.1.1).
When the problem involves non-linear least squares, the inverse of the Hessian matrix
provides theCramer–Rao lower bound on the covariancematrix, i.e., itprovides the minimum
amount of covariance in a given solution, which can actually have a wider spread (“longer
tails”) if the energy flattens out away from the local minimum where the optimal solution is
found.
6.1.5 3D alignment
Instead of aligning 2D sets of image features, many computer vision applications require the
alignment of 3D points. In the case where the 3D transformations are linear in the motion
parameters, e.g., for translation, similarity, and affine, regular least squares (6.5) can be used.
The case of rigid (Euclidean) motion,
E
R3D
=
X
i
kx
0
i
Rx
i
tk
2
;
(6.31)
which arises more frequently and is often called the absolute orientation problem (Horn
1987), requiresslightlydifferenttechniques. . Ifonlyscalarweightingsarebeingused(as
opposed to full 3D per-point anisotropic covariance estimates), the weighted centroids of the
two point clouds c and c
0
can be usedto estimate the translation t = c
0
Rc.
8
We are then
left with the problem of estimating the rotation between two sets of points f^x
i
= x
i
cg
and f^x
0
i
=x0
i
c0g that are both centered at the origin.
One commonly used technique is called the orthogonal Procrustes algorithm (Goluband
Van Loan 1996,p.601)andinvolvescomputingthesingularvaluedecomposition(SVD)of
Whenfullcovariancesareused,theyaretransformedbytherotationandsoaclosed-formsolutionfortransla-
tion is notpossible.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete page in pdf file; delete pdf pages android
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pages in pdf online
6.2 Pose estimation
321
the 3 3 correlation matrix
C=
X
i
^x
0
^x
T
=UV
T
:
(6.32)
The rotation matrixis then obtainedas R = UV
T
.(Verifythis for yourself when ^x
0
=R^x.)
Another technique is the absolute orientation algorithm (Horn1987) for estimating the
unitquaternioncorresponding to the rotation matrixR, whichinvolves forming a44matrix
from the entries in C and then finding the eigenvector associated with its largest positive
eigenvalue.
Lorusso, Eggert, and Fisher(1995)experimentallycomparethesetwotechniquestotwo
additional techniques proposed in the literature, but find that the difference in accuracy is
negligible (well below the effects of measurement noise).
In situations where these closed-form algorithms are not applicable, e.g., when full 3D
covariances are being used or whenthe 3D alignment is part of some larger optimization, the
incremental rotation update introduced in Section2.1.4 (2.352.36), which is parameterized
by an instantaneous rotation vector !, can be used (See Section9.1.3 for an application to
image stitching.)
In some situations, e.g., when merging range data maps, the correspondence between
data points is not known a priori. In this case, iterative algorithms that start by matching
nearby points and then update the most likely correspondence can be used (BeslandMcKay
1992; Zhang 1994; Szeliski and Lavall´ee 1996; Gold, Rangarajan, Lu et al. 1998; David,
DeMenthon, Duraiswami et al. 2004; Li and Hartley 2007; Enqvist, Josephson, and Kahl
2009).ThesetechniquesarediscussedinmoredetailinSection12.2.1.
6.2 Pose estimation
Aparticular instance of feature-based alignment, which occurs very often, is estimating an
object’s 3D pose from a set of 2D point projections. This pose estimation problem is also
known as extrinsic calibration, as opposed to the intrinsic calibration of internal camera pa-
rameters such as focal length, which we discuss in Section6.3. The problem of recovering
pose from three correspondences, which is the minimal amount of information necessary,
is known as the perspective-3-point-problem (P3P), with extensions to larger numbers of
points collectively known as PnP (Haralick,Lee,Ottenbergetal.1994;QuanandLan1999;
Moreno-Noguer, Lepetit, and Fua 2007).
In this section, we look at some of the techniques that have been developed to solve such
problems, starting withthe direct linear transform (DLT), whichrecovers a 34 camera ma-
trix, followed by other “linear” algorithms, and then looking at statistically optimal iterative
algorithms.
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete pages pdf files; cut pages out of pdf file
322
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
6.2.1 Linear algorithms
The simplest way to recover the pose of the camera is to form a set of linear equations analo-
gous to those used for 2D motion estimation (6.19) from the camera matrix form of perspec-
tive projection (2.552.56),
x
i
=
p
00
X
i
+p
01
Y
i
+p
02
Z
i
+p
03
p
20
X
i
+p
21
Y
i
+p
22
Z
i
+p
23
(6.33)
y
i
=
p
10
X
i
+p
11
Y
i
+p
12
Z
i
+p
13
p
20
X
i
+p
21
Y
i
+p
22
Z
i
+p
23
;
(6.34)
where (x
i
;y
i
)are the measured 2D feature locations and (X
i
;Y
i
;Z
i
) are the known 3D
feature locations (Figure6.4). As with (6.21), this system of equations can be solved in a
linear fashion for the unknowns in the camera matrix P by multiplying the denominator on
both sides of the equation.9 The resulting algorithm is called the direct linear transform
(DLT) and is commonly attributed toSutherland (1974). (For a more in-depth discussion,
refer to the work ofHartleyandZisserman(2004).) In order to compute the 12 (or 11)
unknowns in P, at least six correspondences between 3D and 2D locations must be known.
As with the case of estimating homographies (6.216.23), more accurate results for the
entries in P can be obtained by directly minimizing the set of Equations (6.336.34) using
non-linear least squares with a small number of iterations.
Once the entries in P have been recovered, it is possible to recover both the intrinsic
calibration matrix K and the rigid transformation (R;t) by observing from Equation (2.56)
that
P = K[Rjt]:
(6.35)
Since K is by convention upper-triangular (see the discussion in Section2.1.5), both K and
Rcan be obtained from the front 3 3 sub-matrix of P using RQ factorization (Goluband
Van Loan 1996).
10
In most applications, however, we have some prior knowledge about the intrinsic cali-
bration matrix K, e.g., that the pixels are square, the skew is very small, and the optical
center is near the center of the image (2.572.59). Such constraints can be incorporated into
anon-linear minimization of the parameters inK and (R;t), as described in Section6.2.2.
In the case where the camera is already calibrated, i.e., the matrix K is known (Sec-
tion6.3), we can perform pose estimation using as few as three points (FischlerandBolles
1981; Haralick, Lee, Ottenberg et al. 1994; Quan and Lan 1999).Thebasicobservationthat
these linear PnP (perspective n-point) algorithms employis that the visualangle betweenany
BecauseP isunknownuptoascale,wecaneitherfixoneoftheentries,e.g.,p
23
=1, orfind the smallest
singularvectoroftheset oflinearequations.
10 Notetheunfortunateclashofterminologies: In n matrixalgebratextbooks,R
represents an upper-triangular
matrix;in computervision,R is an orthogonal rotation.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages pdf online; delete page from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete pages pdf; delete page from pdf file
6.2 Pose estimation
323
p
i
= (X
i
,Y
i
,Z
i
,W
i
)
x
i
p
j
d
ij
d
i
d
j
x
j
θ
ij
c
Figure 6.4 Pose estimation by the direct linear transform and by measuring visual angles
and distances between pairs of points.
pair of 2D points ^x
i
and ^x
j
must be the same as the angle between their corresponding 3D
points p
i
and p
j
(Figure6.4).
Givena setof corresponding2Dand3Dpoints f(^x
i
;p
i
)g, wherethe ^x
i
areunit directions
obtained by transforming 2D pixel measurements x
i
to unit norm 3D directions ^x
i
through
the inverse calibration matrix K,
^x
i
=N(K
1
x
i
)= K
1
x
i
=kK
1
x
i
k;
(6.36)
the unknowns are the distances d
i
from the camera origin c to the 3D points p
i
,where
p
i
=d
i
^x
i
+c
(6.37)
(Figure6.4). The cosine lawfor triangle (c;p
i
;p
j
)gives us
f
ij
(d
i
;d
j
)= d
2
i
+d
2
j
2d
i
d
j
c
ij
d
2
ij
=0;
(6.38)
where
c
ij
=cos
ij
= ^x
i
^x
j
(6.39)
and
d
2
ij
=kp
i
p
j
k
2
:
(6.40)
We can take any triplet of constraints (f
ij
;f
ik
;f
jk
)and eliminate the d
j
and d
k
using
Sylvester resultants (Cox,Little,andO’Shea2007) to obtain a quartic equation in d
2
i
,
g
ijk
(d
2
i
)= a
4
d
8
i
+a
3
d
6
i
+a
2
d
4
i
+a
1
d
2
i
+a
0
=0:
(6.41)
Given five or more correspondences, we can generate
(n 1)(n 2)
2
triplets to obtain a linear
estimate (using SVD) for the values of (d
8
i
;d
6
i
;d
4
i
;d
2
i
)(QuanandLan1999). Estimates for
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete page from pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete page in pdf reader; delete pages from pdf preview
324
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
d
2
i
can computed as ratios of successive d
2n+2
i
=d
2n
i
estimates and these can be averaged to
obtain a final estimate of d
2
i
(and hence d
i
).
Once the individual estimates of the d
i
distances have been computed, we can generate
a3D structure consisting of the scaled point directions d
i
^x
i
,which can then be aligned with
the 3D point cloud fp
i
gusing absolute orientation (Section6.1.5) to obtained the desired
pose estimate. QuanandLan(1999) give accuracy results for this and other techniques,
which use fewer points but require more complicated algebraic manipulations. The paper by
Moreno-Noguer, Lepetit, and Fua(2007)reviewsmorerecentalternativesandalsogivesa
lower complexity algorithm that typically produces more accurate results.
Unfortunately, because minimalPnP solutions canbe quite noise sensitive and alsosuffer
from bas-relief ambiguities (e.g., depth reversals) (Section7.4.3), it is often preferable to use
the linear six-point algorithm to guess an initial pose and then optimize this estimate using
the iterative technique described in Section6.2.2.
Analternative pose estimationalgorithm involves starting witha scaled orthographic pro-
jectionmodel and then iterativelyrefining this initial estimate usinga more accurate perspec-
tive projection model (DeMenthonandDavis1995). The attraction of this model, as stated
in the paper’s title, is that it can be implemented “in 25 lines of [Mathematica] code”.
6.2.2 Iterative algorithms
The most accurate (and flexible) way to estimate pose is to directly minimize the squared (or
robust) reprojection error for the 2D points as a function of the unknown pose parameters in
(R;t) and optionally K using non-linear least squares (Tsai1987;Bogart1991;Gleicher
and Witkin 1992).Wecanwritetheprojectionequationsas
x
i
=f(p
i
;R;t;K)
(6.42)
and iteratively minimize the robustified linearized reprojection errors
E
NLP
=
X
i
@f
@R
R+
@f
@t
t+
@f
@K
K   r
i
;
(6.43)
where r
i
= ~x
i
^
x
i
is the current residual vector (2D error in predicted position) and the
partial derivatives are withrespect to the unknown pose parameters (rotation, translation, and
optionally calibration). Note that if full 2D covariance estimates are available for the 2D
feature locations, the above squared norm can be weighted by the inverse point covariance
matrix, as in Equation (6.11).
Aneasier tounderstand (andimplement) version of the above non-linear regressionprob-
lem can be constructed by re-writing the projection equations as a concatenation of simpler
steps, eachof which transforms a 4Dhomogeneous coordinate p
i
bya simple transformation
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages of pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from a pdf document; delete pages from a pdf
6.2 Pose estimation
325
f
C
(x) = Kx
k
f
P
(x) = p/z
f
R
(x) = Rx
q
j
f
T
(x) = x -c
c
j
p
i
x
i
y
(1)
y
(2)
y
(3)
Figure 6.5 Aset of chained transforms for projectinga 3Dpointp
i
to a 2Dmeasurement x
i
througha series of transformations f
(k)
,each of whichis controlledby its own set of param-
eters. The dashed lines indicate the flow of information as partial derivatives are computed
during a backward pass.
such as translation, rotation, or perspective division (Figure6.5). The resulting projection
equations can be written as
y
(1)
= f
T
(p
i
;c
j
)= p
i
c
j
;
(6.44)
y
(2)
= f
R
(y
(1)
;q
j
)= R(q
j
)y
(1)
;
(6.45)
y
(3)
= f
P
(y
(2)
)=
y
(2)
z(2)
;
(6.46)
x
i
= f
C
(y
(3)
;k) = K(k) y
(3)
:
(6.47)
Note that in these equations, we have indexed the camera centers c
j
and camera rotation
quaternions q
j
by an index j, in case more than one pose of the calibration object is being
used (see also Section7.4.) We are also using the camera center c
j
instead of the world
translation t
j
,since this is a more natural parameter to estimate.
The advantage of this chained set of transformations is that each one has a simple partial
derivative with respect both to its parameters and to its input. Thus, once the predicted value
of ~x
i
has beencomputed basedon the 3Dpoint location p
i
andthe currentvalues of the pose
parameters (c
j
;q
j
;k), we can obtain all of the required partial derivatives using the chain
rule
@r
i
@p(k)
=
@r
i
@y(k)
@y
(k)
@p(k)
;
(6.48)
where p
(k)
indicates one of the parameter vectors that is being optimized. (This same “trick”
is used in neural networks as part of the backpropagation algorithm (Bishop2006).)
The one special case in this formulation that can be considerably simplifiedis the compu-
tationof the rotationupdate. Instead of directlycomputing the derivatives of the33 rotation
matrix R(q) as a functionof the unit quaternion entries, you canprepend the incremental ro-
tationmatrix R(!) givenin Equation (2.35) tothe currentrotation matrix and compute the
326
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 6.6 The VideoMouse cansense six degrees of freedom relative to a speciallyprinted
mouse pad using its embedded camera (Hinckley, Sinclair, Hansonetal. 1999)  c 1999
ACM: (a) topview of the mouse; (b) view of the mouse showing the curvedbase for rocking;
(c) moving the mouse pad with the other hand extends the interaction capabilities; (d) the
resulting movement seen on the screen.
partial derivative of the transform with respect to these parameters, which results in a simple
cross product of the backward chaining partial derivative and the outgoing 3D vector (2.36).
6.2.3 Application: Augmented reality
Awidely used application of pose estimation is augmented reality, where virtual 3D images
or annotations are superimposed on top of a live video feed, either through the use of see-
through glasses (a head-mounted display) or on a regular computer or mobile device screen
(Azuma,Baillot, Behringeretal.2001;Haller,Billinghurst,andThomas2007). In some
applications, a special pattern printed on cards or in a book is tracked to perform the aug-
mentation (Kato,Billinghurst,Poupyrevetal.2000;Billinghurst,Kato,andPoupyrev2001).
For a desktop application, a grid of dots printed on a mouse pad can be tracked by a camera
embedded in an augmented mouse to give the user control of a full six degrees of freedom
over their position and orientation in a 3D space (Hinckley,Sinclair,Hansonetal.1999), as
shown in Figure6.6.
Sometimes, the scene itself provides a convenient object to track, such as the rectangle
defining a desktop used in through-the-lens camera control (GleicherandWitkin1992). In
outdoor locations, such as film sets, it is more common to place special markers such as
brightly colored balls in the scene to make it easier to find and track them (Bogart1991). In
older applications, surveying techniques were used to determine the locations of these balls
before filming. Today, it is more common to apply structure-from-motion directly to the film
footage itself (Section7.4.2).
Rapid pose estimation is also central to tracking the position and orientation of the hand-
held remote controls used in Nintendo’s Wii game systems. A high-speed camera embedded
in the remote control is used to track the locations of the infrared (IR) LEDs in the bar that
6.3 Geometric intrinsic calibration
327
is mounted on the TV monitor. Pose estimation is then used to infer the remote control’s
location and orientationat veryhigh frame rates. The Wii system canbe extendedto avariety
of other user interaction applications bymountingthebar on ahand-helddevice, as described
by Johnny Lee.
11
Exercises6.4and6.5 haveyouimplementtwo differenttracking and pose estimation sys-
tems for augmented-reality applications. The first system tracks the outline of a rectangular
object, such as a book cover or magazine page, and the second has you track the pose of a
hand-held Rubik’s cube.
6.3 Geometric intrinsic calibration
As described above in Equations (6.426.43), thecomputation of the internal (intrinsic) cam-
era calibration parameters can occur simultaneously with the estimation of the (extrinsic)
pose of the camera with respect to a known calibration target. This, indeed, is the “classic”
approach to camera calibration used in both the photogrammetry (Slama1980) and the com-
puter vision (Tsai1987) communities. In this section, we look at alternative formulations
(which may not involve the full solution of a non-linear regressionproblem), the use of alter-
native calibration targets, and the estimation of the non-linear part of camera optics such as
radial distortion.
12
6.3.1 Calibration patterns
The use of a calibration pattern or set of markers is one of the more reliable ways to estimate
acamera’s intrinsic parameters. In photogrammetry, it is common to set up a camera in a
large field looking at distant calibration targets whose exact location has been precomputed
using surveying equipment (Slama1980;Atkinson1996;Kraus1997). Inthis case, the trans-
lational component of the pose becomes irrelevant and only the camera rotation andintrinsic
parameters need to be recovered.
If a smaller calibration rig needs to be used, e.g., for indoor robotics applications or for
mobile robots thatcarrytheir own calibrationtarget, itis bestif the calibrationobject can span
as much of the workspace as possible (Figure6.8a), as planar targets often fail to accurately
predict the components of the pose that lie far awayfrom the plane. A good way to determine
if the calibration has been successfully performed is to estimate the covariance in the param-
eters (Section6.1.4) and then project 3Dpoints from various points in the workspace into the
image in order to estimate their 2D positional uncertainty.
11
http://johnnylee.net/projects/wii/.
12 Insomeapplications,youcanusetheEXIFtagsassociatedwithaJPEGimagetoobtainaroughestimateofa
camera’sfocallength but this technique should beused with caution astheresultsareoften inaccurate.
328
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 6.7 Calibrating a lens by drawing straight lines on cardboard (Debevec,Wenger,
Tchou et al. 2002)
c
2002 ACM: (a) an image taken by the video camera showing a hand
holdinga metalruler whose rightedge appears vertical inthe image;(b) the setof lines drawn
on the cardboard converging on the front nodal point (center of projection) of the lens and
indicating the horizontal field of view.
An alternative method for estimating the focal length and center of projection of a lens
is to place the camera on a large flat piece of cardboard and use a long metal ruler to draw
lines on the cardboard that appear vertical in the image, as shown in Figure6.7a (Debevec,
Wenger, Tchou et al. 2002). Suchlineslieonplanesthatareparalleltotheverticalaxisof
the camera sensor and also pass through the lens’ front nodal point. The location of the nodal
point (projected vertically onto the cardboard plane) and the horizontal field of view (deter-
minedfrom lines that graze the left and right edges of the visible image) can be recovered by
intersecting these lines and measuring their angular extent (Figure6.7b).
If no calibration pattern is available, it is also possible to perform calibration simulta-
neously with structure and pose recovery (Sections6.3.4 and7.4), which is known as self-
calibration (Faugeras,Luong,andMaybank1992;HartleyandZisserman2004;Moons,Van
Gool, and Vergauwen 2010).However,suchanapproachrequiresalargeamountofimagery
to be accurate.
Planar calibration patterns
When a finite workspace is being used and accurate machining and motion control platforms
are available, a good way to perform calibration is to move a planar calibration target in a
controlled fashion through the workspace volume. This approach is sometimes called the N-
planes calibration approach (Gremban,Thorpe,andKanade1988;Champleboux,Lavall´ee,
Szeliski et al. 1992;Grossberg and Nayar 2001)andhastheadvantagethateachcamerapixel
can be mapped to a unique 3D ray in space, which takes care of both linear effects modeled
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested