c# pdf reader table : Delete pages on pdf Library control component .net azure html mvc SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft42-part617

8.2 Parametric motion
399
The parametric incremental motion update rule now becomes
E
LK PM
(p + p) =
X
i
[I
1
(x
0
(x
i
;p + p))   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(8.49)
X
i
[I
1
(x
0
i
)+ J
1
(x
0
i
)p   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(8.50)
=
X
i
[J
1
(x
0
i
)p+ e
i
]
2
;
(8.51)
where the Jacobian is now
J
1
(x
0
i
)=
@I
1
@p
=rI
1
(x
0
i
)
@x
0
@p
(x
i
);
(8.52)
i.e., the product of the image gradient rI
1
with the Jacobian of the correspondence field,
J
x0
=@x0=@p.
The motion Jacobians J
x
0
for the 2D planar transformations introduced in Section2.1.2
andTable2.1 are given inTable6.1. Note howwe havere-parameterizedthemotion matrices
so that they are always the identity at the origin p = 0. This becomes useful later, when we
talk about the compositional and inverse compositionalalgorithms. (It also makes it easier to
impose priors on the motions.)
For parametric motion, the (Gauss–Newton) Hessian and gradient-weighted residual vec-
tor become
A=
X
i
J
T
x
0
(x
i
)[rI
T
1
(x
0
i
)rI
1
(x
0
i
)]J
x
0
(x
i
)
(8.53)
and
b=  
X
i
J
T
x
0
(x
i
)[e
i
rI
T
1
(x
0
i
)]:
(8.54)
Note how the expressions inside the square brackets are the same ones evaluated for the
simpler translational motion case (8.408.41).
Patch-based approximation. The computation of theHessianandresidual vectors for
parametric motion can be significantly more expensive than for the translational case. For
parametric motion with n parameters and N pixels, the accumulation of A and b takes
O(n
2
N) operations (BakerandMatthews2004). One way to reduce this by a significant
amount is to divide the image up intosmaller sub-blocks (patches) P
j
and to only accumulate
the simpler 2  2 quantities inside the square brackets at the pixel level (ShumandSzeliski
2000),
A
j
=
X
i2P
j
rI
T
1
(x
0
i
)rI
1
(x
0
i
)
(8.55)
b
j
=
X
i2P
j
e
i
rI
T
1
(x
0
i
):
(8.56)
Delete pages on pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete pages from pdf reader
Delete pages on pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page in pdf reader; delete page pdf
400
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
The full Hessian and residual can then be approximated as
A
X
j
J
T
x
0
(^x
j
)[
X
i2P
j
rI
T
1
(x
0
i
)rI
1
(x
0
i
)]J
x
0
(^x
j
)=
X
j
J
T
x
0
(^x
j
)A
j
J
x
0
(^x
j
) (8.57)
and
b  
X
j
J
T
x
0
(
^
x
j
)[
X
i2P
j
e
i
rI
T
1
(x
0
i
)] =  
X
j
J
T
x
0
(
^
x
j
)b
j
;
(8.58)
where ^x
j
is the center of each patch P
j
(ShumandSzeliski2000). This is equivalent to
replacing the true motion Jacobian with a piecewise-constant approximation. In practice,
this works quite well. The relationship of this approximation to feature-based registration is
discussed in Section9.2.4.
Compositional approach. Foracomplexparametricmotionsuchasahomography, the
computation of the motion Jacobian becomes complicated and may involve a per-pixel divi-
sion.SzeliskiandShum (1997) observedthat this canbe simplified byfirst warping the target
image I
1
according to the current motion estimate x
0
(x;p),
~
I
1
(x) = I
1
(x
0
(x;p));
(8.59)
and then comparing this warped image against the template I
0
(x),
E
LK SS
(p) =
X
i
[
~
I
1
(
~
x(x
i
;p))   I
0
(x
i
)]
2
(8.60)
X
i
[
~
J
1
(x
i
)p + e
i
]
2
(8.61)
=
X
i
[r
~
I
1
(x
i
)J
~
x
(x
i
)p + e
i
]
2
:
(8.62)
Note that since the two images are assumed to be fairly similar, only an incremental para-
metric motion is required, i.e., the incremental motion canbe evaluated around p = 0, which
can lead to considerable simplifications. For example, the Jacobian of the planar projective
transform (6.19) now becomes
J
~
x
=
@~x
@p
p
=0
=
"
x y 1 0 0 0  x
2
xy
0 0 0 x y 1  xy  y2
#
:
(8.63)
Once the incremental motion
~
xhas been computed, it can be prepended to the previously
estimated motion, which is easy to do for motions represented with transformation matrices,
such as those given in Tables2.1 and6.1BakerandMatthews(2004) call this the forward
compositional algorithm, since the target image is being re-warped and the final motion esti-
mates are being composed.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete blank pages from pdf file
8.2 Parametric motion
401
If the appearance of the warped and template images is similar enough, we can replace
the gradient of
~
I
1
(x) with the gradient of I
0
(x), as suggestedpreviously (8.43). This has po-
tentially a big advantage in that it allows the pre-computation (and inversion) of the Hessian
matrix Agiven in Equation (8.53). The residualvector b (8.54) can also be partially precom-
puted, i.e., the steepest descent images rI
0
(x)J
~
x
(x) can precomputed and stored for later
multiplication with the e(x) =
~
I
1
(x) I
0
(x) error images (BakerandMatthews2004). This
idea was firstsuggested byHagerandBelhumeur(1998) in whatBakerandMatthews(2004)
call a inverse additive scheme.
Baker and Matthews(2004)introduceonemorevarianttheycalltheinversecomposi-
tional algorithm. Rather than (conceptually) re-warping the warped target image
~
I
1
(x), they
instead warp the template image I
0
(x) and minimize
E
LK BM
(p) =
X
i
[
~
I
1
(x
i
)  I
0
(~x(x
i
;p))]
2
(8.64)
X
i
[rI
0
(x
i
)J
~
x
(x
i
)p   e
i
]
2
:
(8.65)
This is identical to the forward warped algorithm (8.62) with the gradients r
~
I
1
(x) replaced
bythe gradients rI
0
(x), exceptfor the signof e
i
.The resulting update p is the negative of
the one computed by the modified Equation (8.62) and hence the inverse of the incremental
transformation must be prepended to the current transform. Because the inverse composi-
tional algorithm has the potential of pre-computing the inverse Hessian and the steepest de-
scent images, this makes it the preferred approach of those surveyed byBakerandMatthews
(2004). Figure8.5 (Baker,Gross, Ishikawaetal.2003) beautifully shows all of the steps
required to implement the inverse compositional algorithm.
Baker and Matthews(2004)alsodiscusstheadvantageofusingGauss–Newtoniteration
(i.e., the first-order expansion of the least squares, as above) compared to other approaches
such as steepest descent and Levenberg–Marquardt. Subsequent parts of the series (Baker,
Gross, Ishikawa et al. 2003; Baker, Gross, and Matthews 2003, 2004)discussmoreadvanced
topicssuchas per-pixelweighting, pixelselectionfor efficiency, amorein-depthdiscussionof
robust metrics and algorithms, linear appearance variations, and priors on parameters. They
make for invaluable reading for anyone interested in implementing a highly tuned imple-
mentation of incremental image registration.EvangelidisandPsarakis(2008) provide some
detailed experimental evaluations of these and other related approaches.
8.2.1 Application: Video stabilization
Video stabilization is one of the most widely used applications of parametric motion esti-
mation (Hansen,Anandan,Danaetal.1994;Irani,Rousso,andPeleg1997;Morimotoand
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pdf pages android; add and delete pages in pdf online
402
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 8.5
Aschematic overview of the inverse compositional algorithm (copied, with
permission, from (Baker,Gross,Ishikawaetal.2003)). Steps 3–6 (light-colored arrows) are
performedonce as apre-computation. The mainalgorithm simplyconsists of iterating: image
warping (Step 1), image differencing (Step 2), image dot products (Step 7), multiplication
with the inverse of the Hessian (Step 8), and the update to the warp (Step 9). All of these
steps can be performed efficiently.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
add and delete pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
cut pages from pdf file; delete page on pdf reader
8.2 Parametric motion
403
Chellappa 1997; Srinivasan, Chellappa, Veeraraghavan etal. 2005).Algorithmsforstabiliza-
tion run inside both hardware devices, such as camcorders and still cameras, and software
packages for improving the visual quality of shaky videos.
In their paper on full-frame video stabilization,Matsushita,Ofek,Geetal.(2006) give
anice overview of the three major stages of stabilization, namely motion estimation, motion
smoothing, and image warping. Motion estimation algorithms often use a similarity trans-
form to handle camera translations, rotations, and zooming. The tricky part is getting these
algorithms to lock onto the background motion, which is a result of the camera movement,
without getting distracted by independent moving foreground objects. Motion smoothing al-
gorithms recover the low-frequency (slowly varying) part of the motion and then estimate
the high-frequency shake component that needs to be removed. Finally, image warping algo-
rithms apply the high-frequency correction to render the original frames as if the camera had
undergone only the smooth motion.
Theresulting stabilization algorithms can greatlyimprove the appearance of shakyvideos
but they often still contain visual artifacts. For example, image warping can result in missing
borders aroundthe image, which mustbecropped, filledusing informationfrom other frames,
or hallucinatedusinginpainting techniques (Section10.5.1). Furthermore, video frames cap-
tured during fast motion are often blurry. Their appearance can be improved either using
deblurring techniques (Section10.3) or stealing sharper pixels from other frames with less
motion or better focus (Matsushita,Ofek,Geetal.2006). Exercise8.3 has you implement
and test some of these ideas.
In situations where the camera is translating a lot in 3D, e.g., when the videographer is
walking, an even better approach is to compute a full structure from motion reconstruction
of the camera motion and 3D scene. A smooth 3D camera path can then be computed and
the original video re-rendered using view interpolation with the interpolated 3D point cloud
serving as the proxy geometry while preserving salient features (Liu, Gleicher, Jinetal.
2009).Ifyouhaveaccesstoacameraarrayinsteadofasinglevideocamera,youcandoeven
better using a light field rendering approach (Section13.3) (Smith,Zhang,Jinetal.2009).
8.2.2 Learned motion models
An alternative to parameterizing the motion field with a geometric deformation such as an
affine transform is to learn a set of basis functions tailored to a particular application (Black,
Yacoob, Jepsonet al. 1997).First,asetofdensemotionfields(Section8.4)iscomputedfrom
aset of training videos. Next, singular value decomposition (SVD) is applied to the stack of
motion fields u
t
(x) to compute the first few singular vectors v
k
(x). Finally, for a new test
sequence, a novel flow field is computed using a coarse-to-fine algorithm that estimates the
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page from pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pdf pages in preview; delete page in pdf preview
404
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 8.6 Learned parameterized motion fields for a walking sequence (Black, Yacoob,
Jepsonetal. 1997) c 1997IEEE:(a)learnedbasisflowfields;(b)plotsofmotioncoefficients
over time and corresponding estimated motionfields.
unknown coefficient a
k
in the parameterized flow field
u(x) =
X
k
a
k
v
k
(x):
(8.66)
Figure8.6a shows a set of basis fields learned by observing videos of walking motions.
Figure8.6b shows the temporal evolution of the basis coefficients as well as a few of the
recovered parametric motion fields. Note that similar ideas can also be applied to feature
tracks (Torresani,Hertzmann,andBregler2008), which is a topic we discuss in more detail
in Sections4.1.4 and12.6.4.
8.3 Spline-based motion
While parametric motion models are useful in a wide variety of applications (such as video
stabilization and mapping onto planar surfaces), most image motion is too complicated to be
captured by such low-dimensional models.
Traditionally, optical flow algorithms (Section8.4) compute an independent motion esti-
mate for each pixel, i.e., the number of flow vectors computedis equal to the number of input
pixels. The general optical flowanalog to Equation (8.1) can thus be written as
E
SSD OF
(fu
i
g) =
X
i
[I
1
(x
i
+u
i
)  I
0
(x
i
)]
2
:
(8.67)
8.3 Spline-based motion
405
Figure 8.7 Spline motion field: the displacement vectors u
i
=(u
i
;v
i
)are shown as pluses
(+) and are controlled by the smaller number of control vertices ^u
j
= (^u
i
;^v
j
), which are
shown as circles ().
Notice how in the above equation, the number of variables fu
i
gis twice the number of
measurements, so the problem is underconstrained.
Thetwoclassicapproaches tothis problem, whichwe studyinSection8.4, are toperform
the summation over overlapping regions (the patch-based or window-based approach) or to
add smoothness terms on the fu
i
gfield using regularization or Markov random fields (Sec-
tion3.7). In this section, we describe an alternative approach that lies somewhere between
general optical flow(independent flow at each pixel) and parametric flow(a small number of
globalparameters). The approach is to represent the motionfield as a two-dimensionalspline
controlled by a smaller number of control vertices f^u
j
g(Figure8.7),
u
i
=
X
j
^u
j
B
j
(x
i
)=
X
j
^u
j
w
i;j
;
(8.68)
where the B
j
(x
i
)are called the basis functions and are only non-zero over a smallfinite sup-
port interval (SzeliskiandCoughlan1997). We call the w
ij
=B
j
(x
i
)weights to emphasize
that the fu
i
gare known linear combinations of the f^u
j
g. Some commonly used spline basis
functions are shown in Figure8.8.
Substituting the formula for the individual per-pixel flow vectors u
i
(8.68) into the SSD
error metric(8.67) yieldsa parametric motionformula similar toEquation(8.50). The biggest
difference is that the Jacobian J
1
(x
0
i
)(8.52) now consists of the sparse entries in the weight
matrix W = [w
ij
].
In situations where we know something more about the motion field, e.g., when the mo-
tion is due to a camera moving ina static scene, we can use more specialized motionmodels.
For example, the plane plus parallax model (Section2.1.5) can be naturally combined with
aspline-based motion representation, where the in-plane motion is represented by a homog-
raphy (6.19) and the out-of-plane parallax d is represented by a scalar variable at each spline
406
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 8.8 Sample spline basis functions (SzeliskiandCoughlan1997)  c 1997 Springer.
The block (constant) interpolator/basis corresponds to block-based motion estimation
(LeGall1991). See Section3.5.1 for more details on spline functions.
8.3 Spline-based motion
407
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 8.9 Quadtree spline-based motion estimation (SzeliskiandShum1996)  c 1996
IEEE:(a) quadtree spline representation, (b) whichcan lead tocracks, unless thewhite nodes
are constrained to depend on their parents; (c) deformed quadtree spline mesh overlaid on
grayscale image; (d) flow field visualized as a needle diagram.
control point (SzeliskiandKang1995;SzeliskiandCoughlan1997).
In manycases, the small number of splinevertices results in a motionestimation problem
that is well conditioned. However, if large textureless regions (or elongated edges subject
to the aperture problem) persist across several spline patches, it may be necessary to add a
regularization term to make the problem well posed (Section3.7.1). The simplest way to
do this is to directly add squared difference penalties between adjacent vertices in the spline
control mesh f^u
j
g, as in (3.100). If a multi-resolution (coarse-to-fine) strategy is beingused,
it is important to re-scale these smoothness terms while going from level to level.
The linear system corresponding to the spline-based motionestimator is sparse and regu-
lar. Because it is usually of moderate size, it canoften be solved using direct techniques such
as Cholesky decomposition (AppendixA.4). Alternatively, if the problem becomes too large
andsubjecttoexcessivefill-in, iterative techniques suchas hierarchicallypreconditionedcon-
jugate gradient (Szeliski1990b,2006b) can be usedinstead (AppendixA.5).
Because of its robustness, spline-based motion estimation has been used for a number
of applications, including visual effects (Roble1999) and medical image registration (Sec-
tion8.3.1) (SzeliskiandLavall´ee1996;KybicandUnser2003).
One disadvantage of the basic technique, however, is that the model does a poor job
near motion discontinuities, unless an excessive number of nodes is used. To remedy this
situation,SzeliskiandShum (1996) propose usinga quadtree representation embeddedin the
spline control grid (Figure8.9a). Large cells are used to present regions of smooth motion,
while smaller cells are added in regions of motion discontinuities (Figure8.9c).
To estimate the motion, a coarse-to-fine strategy is used. Starting with a regular spline
imposed over a lower-resolution image, an initial motion estimate is obtained. Spline patches
where the motion is inconsistent, i.e., the squared residual (8.67) is above a threshold, are
subdivided into smaller patches. In order to avoid cracks in the resulting motion field (Fig-
408
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 8.10 Elastic brain registration (KybicandUnser2003)  c 2003 IEEE: (a) original
brain atlas and patient MRI images overlaid in red–green; (b) after elastic registration with
eight user-specified landmarks (not shown); (c) a cubic B-spline deformation field, shown as
adeformed grid.
ure8.9b), the values of certain nodes in the refined mesh, i.e., those adjacent to larger cells,
need to be restricted so that they depend on their parent values. This is most easily accom-
plished using a hierarchical basis representation for the quadtree spline (Szeliski1990b) and
selectively setting some of the hierarchical basis functions to 0, as described in (Szeliskiand
Shum 1996).
8.3.1 Application: Medical image registration
Because they excel at representing smooth elastic deformation fields, spline-based motion
models have found widespread use in medical image registration (BajcsyandKovacic1989;
Szeliski and Lavall´ee 1996; Christensen, Joshi, and Miller 1997).
10
Registration techniques
can be used both to track an individual patient’s development or progress over time (a lon-
gitudinal study) or to match different patient images together to find commonalities and de-
tect variations or pathologies (cross-sectional studies). When different imaging modalities
are being registered, e.g., computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance images
(MRI), mutual information measures of similarity are often necessary (ViolaandWellsIII
1997; Maes, Collignon, Vandermeulen et al. 1997).
Kybic andUnser(2003)provideaniceliteraturereviewanddescribeacompleteworking
system based on representing both the images and the deformation fields as multi-resolution
splines. Figure8.10 shows an example of the Kybic and Unser system being used to register
apatient’s brain MRI with a labeled brain atlas image. The system can be run in a fully auto-
10Incomputergraphics,suchelasticvolumetricdeformationareknownasfree-formdeformations(Sederbergand
Parry 1986;Coquillart1990; Celnikerand Gossard 1991).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested