c# pdf reader table : Delete a page from a pdf reader software Library cloud windows asp.net .net class SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft45-part620

9Image stitching
429
Algorithms for aligning images and stitching them into seamless photo-mosaics are among
the oldest and most widely used in computer vision (Milgram1975;Peleg1981). image
stitching algorithms create the high-resolution photo-mosaics used to produce today’s digital
maps and satellite photos. They also comebundled withmost digital cameras andcanbe used
to create beautiful ultra wide-angle panoramas.
image stitching originated in the photogrammetry community, where more manually in-
tensive methods based on surveyed ground control points or manually registered tie points
have long been used to register aerial photos into large-scale photo-mosaics (Slama1980).
One of the key advances in this community was the development of bundle adjustment al-
gorithms (Section7.4), which could simultaneously solve for the locations of all of the cam-
era positions, thus yielding globally consistent solutions (Triggs,McLauchlan,Hartleyetal.
1999). Anotherrecurringproblem m increatingphoto-mosaicsistheeliminationofvisible
seams, for which a variety of techniques have been developed over the years (Milgram1975,
1977; Peleg 1981; Davis 1998; Agarwala, Dontcheva, Agrawala et al. 2004)
In film photography, special cameras were developed in the 1990s to take ultra-wide-
angle panoramas, oftenby exposingthe film througha vertical slit as the camera rotatedonits
axis (Meehan1990). In the mid-1990s, image alignment techniques started being applied to
the construction of wide-angle seamless panoramas from regular hand-held cameras (Mann
and Picard 1994; Chen 1995; Szeliski 1996). Morerecentworkinthisareahasaddressed
the need to compute globally consistent alignments (SzeliskiandShum1997;Sawhneyand
Kumar 1999; Shum and Szeliski2000),toremove“ghosts”duetoparallaxandobjectmove-
ment(Davis1998;ShumandSzeliski2000;Uyttendaele,Eden,andSzeliski2001;Agarwala,
Dontcheva, Agrawala etal. 2004),andtodealwithvaryingexposures(Mann andPicard1994;
Uyttendaele, Eden, and Szeliski2001;Levin, Zomet, Peleg etal. 2004;Agarwala, Dontcheva,
Agrawala et al. 2004; Eden, Uyttendaele, and Szeliski 2006; Kopf, Uyttendaele, Deussen et
al. 2007).
1
These techniques have spawned a large number of commercial stitching products
(Chen1995;Sawhney,Kumar,Gendeletal.1998), of which reviews and comparisons can
be found on the Web.2
While most of the earlier techniques worked by directly minimizing pixel-to-pixel dis-
similarities, more recent algorithms usually extract a sparse set of features and match them
to each other, as described in Chapter4. Such feature-based approaches to image stitching
have the advantage of being more robust against scene movement and are potentially faster,
if implemented the right way. Their biggest advantage, however, is the ability to “recognize
panoramas”, i.e., to automatically discover the adjacency (overlap) relationships among an
unordered set of images, which makes them ideally suited for fully automated stitching of
1
Acollection ofsome of these papers was compiled byBenosmanandKang(2001) and they are surveyed by
Szeliski(2006a).
2
ThePhotosynth Web site,http://photosynth.net,allows peopleto createand upload panoramasforfree.
Delete a page from a pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf file; delete page in pdf file
Delete a page from a pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf preview; delete pages in pdf online
430
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
panoramas taken by casual users (BrownandLowe2007).
What, then, are the essential problems in image stitching? As with image alignment, we
must firstdeterminetheappropriate mathematicalmodelrelating pixelcoordinates inone im-
ageto pixel coordinates in another;Section9.1 reviews the basic models we havestudied and
presents some new motion models related specifically to panoramic image stitching. Next,
we must somehow estimate the correct alignments relating various pairs (or collections) of
images. Chapter4 discussed how distinctive features can be found in each image and then
efficiently matched to rapidly establish correspondences between pairs of images. Chapter8
discussed how direct pixel-to-pixel comparisons combined with gradient descent (and other
optimization techniques) can also be used to estimate these parameters. When multiple im-
ages exist in a panorama, bundle adjustment (Section7.4) can be used to compute a globally
consistent set of alignments and to efficiently discover which images overlap one another. In
Section9.2, we look at how each of these previously developed techniques can be modified
to take advantage of the imaging setups commonly used to create panoramas.
Once we have aligned the images, wemustchoosea finalcompositing surfacefor warping
the aligned images (Section9.3.1). We also need algorithms toseamlesslycutandblend over-
lapping images, even in the presence of parallax, lens distortion, scene motion, and exposure
differences (Section9.3.29.3.4).
9.1 Motion models
Before we can register and align images, we needto establish the mathematical relationships
that map pixel coordinates from one image to another. A variety of such parametric motion
models are possible, from simple 2D transforms, to planar perspective models, 3D camera
rotations, lens distortions, and mapping to non-planar (e.g., cylindrical) surfaces.
We already covered several of these models in Sections2.1and6.1. In particular, we saw
in Section2.1.5 how the parametric motion describing the deformation of a planar surfaced
as viewed from different positions can be described with an eight-parameter homography
(2.71) (MannandPicard1994;Szeliski1996). We also sawhow a camera undergoing a pure
rotation induces a different kind of homography (2.72).
In this section, we review both of these models and show how they can be applied to dif-
ferent stitching situations. We also introduce spherical and cylindrical compositing surfaces
and show how, under favorable circumstances, they can be used to perform alignment using
pure translations (Section9.1.6). Deciding which alignment model is most appropriate for a
given situation or set of data is a model selection problem (Hastie,Tibshirani,andFriedman
2001;Torr 2002; Bishop2006;Robert2007),animportanttopicwedonotcoverinthisbook.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages pdf online; delete page on pdf document
9.1 Motion models
431
(a) translation [2 dof]
(b) affine [6 dof]
(c) perspective [8 dof] (d) 3D rotation [3+ dof]
Figure 9.2 Two-dimensional motion models and how they can be used for image stitching.
9.1.1 Planar perspective motion
The simplest possible motion model to use when aligning images is to simply translate and
rotate them in 2D (Figure9.2a). This is exactly the same kind of motion that you would
use if you had overlapping photographic prints. It is also the kind of technique favored by
David Hockney to create the collages that he calls joiners (Zelnik-ManorandPerona2007;
Nomura, Zhang, and Nayar 2007). Creatingsuchcollages,whichshowvisibleseamsand
inconsistencies thataddtothe artistic effect, is popular onWebsites suchas Flickr, wherethey
more commonly go under the name panography (Section6.1.2). Translation and rotation are
alsousually adequate motion models tocompensate for smallcamera motions in applications
such as photo and video stabilization and merging (Exercise6.1 and Section8.2.1).
In Section6.1.3, wesaw howthe mappingbetweentwo cameras viewinga commonplane
canbe describedusinga 33 homography (2.71). Consider the matrix M
10
thatarises when
mapping a pixel in one image to a 3D point and then back onto a second image,
~
x
1
~
P
1
~
P
1
0
~
x
0
=M
10
~
x
0
:
(9.1)
Whenthelast row of the P
0
matrix is replacedwitha plane equation ^n
0
p+c
0
and points are
assumed to lie on this plane, i.e., their disparity is d
0
=0, we can ignore the last column of
M
10
and also its last row, since we do not care about the final z-buffer depth. The resulting
homography matrix
~
H
10
(the upper left 3  3 sub-matrix of M
10
)describes the mapping
between pixels in the two images,
~x
1
~
H
10
~x
0
:
(9.2)
This observation formed the basis of some of the earliest automated image stitching al-
gorithms (MannandPicard1994;Szeliski1994,1996). Because reliable feature matching
techniqueshadnotyet beendeveloped, these algorithms useddirectpixelvalue matching, i.e.,
direct parametric motion estimation, as described in Section8.2 and Equations (6.196.20).
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
delete blank page in pdf; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete pdf pages ipad; cut pages from pdf online
432
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Morerecent stitchingalgorithms firstextract features and thenmatchthem up, oftenusing
robust techniques suchas RANSAC(Section6.1.4) tocompute a goodset of inliers. Thefinal
computation of the homography (9.2), i.e., the solution of the least squares fitting problem
given pairs of corresponding features,
x
1
=
(1+ h
00
)x
0
+h
01
y
0
+h
02
h
20
x
0
+h
21
y
0
+1
and y
1
=
h
10
x
0
+(1+ h
11
)y
0
+h
12
h
20
x
0
+h
21
y
0
+1
;
(9.3)
uses iterative least squares, as described in Section6.1.3 andEquations (6.216.23).
9.1.2 Application: Whiteboard and document scanning
The simplest image-stitching application is to stitch together a number of image scans taken
on a flatbed scanner. Say you have a large map, or a piece of child’s artwork, that is too large
to fit on your scanner. Simply take multiple scans of the document, making sure to overlap
the scans by a large enough amount to ensure that there are enough common features. Next,
take successive pairs of images that you know overlap, extract features, match them up, and
estimate the 2D rigid transform (2.16),
x
k+1
=R
k
x
k
+t
k
;
(9.4)
that best matches the features, using two-point RANSAC, if necessary, to find a good set
of inliers. Then, on a final compositing surface (aligned with the first scan, for example),
resample your images (Section3.6.1) and average them together. Can you see any potential
problems with this scheme?
One complication is that a 2D rigid transformation is non-linear in the rotation angle ,
so you will have to either use non-linear least squares or constrain R to be orthonormal, as
described in Section6.1.3.
Abigger problem lies in the pairwise alignment process. As you align more and more
pairs, the solutionmaydriftsothat it is nolonger globallyconsistent. Inthis case, aglobalop-
timization procedure, as described in Section9.2, may be required. Suchglobal optimization
often requires a large system of non-linear equations to be solved, although in some cases,
such as linearizedhomographies (Section9.1.3) or similarity transforms (Section6.1.2), reg-
ular least squares may be an option.
Aslightly more complex scenario is when you take multiple overlapping handheld pic-
tures of a whiteboard or other large planar object (HeandZhang2005;ZhangandHe2007).
Here, the natural motion model to use is a homography, although a more complex model that
estimates the 3D rigid motion relative to the plane (plus the focal length, if unknown), could
in principle be used.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
cut pages out of pdf; best pdf editor delete pages
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete pdf pages
9.1 Motion models
433
Π
:
(0,0,0,1)·p = 0
R
10
x
1
= (x
1
,y
1
,f
1
)
~
x
0
= (x
0
,y
0
,f
0
)
~
Figure 9.3 Pure 3D camera rotation. The form of the homography(mapping) is particularly
simple and depends only on the 3D rotation matrix and focal lengths.
9.1.3 Rotational panoramas
The most typical case for panoramic image stitchingis when the camera undergoes a pure ro-
tation. Thinkof standing atthe rim of the Grand Canyon. Relative to the distantgeometry in
the scene, as you snap away, the camera is undergoing a pure rotation, whichis equivalent to
assumingthat all points arevery far from the camera, i.e., ontheplane at infinity (Figure9.3).
Setting t
0
=t
1
=0, we get the simplified 3  3 homography
~
H
10
=K
1
R
1
R
1
0
K
1
0
=K
1
R
10
K
1
0
;
(9.5)
where K
k
=diag(f
k
;f
k
;1) is the simplified camera intrinsic matrix (2.59), assuming that
c
x
=c
y
=0, i.e., we are indexing the pixels starting from the optical center (Szeliski1996).
This can also be re-written as
2
6
4
x
1
y
1
1
3
7
5
2
6
4
f
1
f
1
1
3
7
5
R
10
2
6
4
f
1
0
f
1
0
1
3
7
5
2
6
4
x
0
y
0
1
3
7
5
(9.6)
or
2
6
4
x
1
y
1
f
1
3
7
5
R
10
2
6
4
x
0
y
0
f
0
3
7
5
;
(9.7)
whichreveals the simplicityof the mappingequations and makes allof themotion parameters
explicit. Thus, instead of the general eight-parameter homography relating a pair of images,
we get the three-, four-, or five-parameter 3D rotation motion models corresponding to the
cases where the focal length f is known, fixed, or variable (SzeliskiandShum1997).
3
Es-
timating the 3D rotation matrix (and, optionally, focal length) associated with each image is
Aninitialestimateofthefocallengthscanbeobtainedusingtheintrinsiccalibrationtechniquesdescribedin
Section6.3.4 orfrom EXIF tags.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete pages of pdf reader; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing
delete pages from a pdf file; cut pages out of pdf online
434
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
intrinsically more stable than estimating a homography with a full eight degrees of freedom,
which makes this the method of choice for large-scale image stitching algorithms (Szeliski
and Shum 1997; Shum and Szeliski 2000; Brown and Lowe 2007).
Given this representation, how do we update the rotation matrices to best align two over-
lapping images? Given a current estimate for the homography
~
H
10
in (9.5), the best way to
update R
10
is to prepend an incremental rotation matrix R(!) to the current estimate R
10
(SzeliskiandShum1997;ShumandSzeliski2000),
~
H(!) = K
1
R(!)R
10
K
1
0
=[K
1
R(!)K
1
1
][K
1
R
10
K
1
0
]= D
~
H
10
:
(9.8)
Note that here we have written the update rule in the compositional form, where the in-
cremental update D is prepended to the current homography
~
H
10
. Using the small-angle
approximation to R(!) given in (2.35), we can write the incremental update matrix as
D= K
1
R(!)K
1
1
K
1
(I + [!]
)K
1
1
=
2
6
4
1
!
z
f
1
!
y
!
z
1
f
1
!
x
!
y
=f
1
!
x
=f
1
1
3
7
5
: (9.9)
Notice how there is now a nice one-to-one correspondence between the entries in the D
matrix and the h
00
;:::;h
21
parameters used in Table6.1 and Equation (6.19), i.e.,
(h
00
;h
01
;h
02
;h
00
;h
11
;h
12
;h
20
;h
21
)= (0; !
z
;f
1
!
y
;!
z
;0; f
1
!
x
; !
y
=f
1
;!
x
=f
1
):
(9.10)
We can therefore apply the chain rule to Equations (6.24 and9.10) to obtain
"
^x
0
x
^y0   y
#
=
"
xy=f
1
f
1
+x
2
=f
1
y
(f
1
+y2=f
1
)
xy=f
1
x
#
2
6
4
!
x
!
y
!
z
3
7
5
;
(9.11)
which give us the linearized update equations needed to estimate ! = (!
x
;!
y
;!
z
).
4
Notice
that this update rule depends on the focal length f
1
of the target view and is independent
of the focal length f
0
of the template view. This is because the compositional algorithm
essentially makes small perturbations to the target. Once the incremental rotation vector !
has been computed, the R
1
rotation matrix can be updated using R
1
R(!)R
1
.
The formulas for updating the focal length estimates are a little more involved and are
given in (ShumandSzeliski2000). We will not repeat them here, since an alternative up-
date rule, based on minimizing the difference between back-projected 3D rays, is given in
Section9.2.1. Figure9.4 shows the alignment of four images under the 3D rotation motion
model.
Thisisthesameastherotationalcomponentofinstantaneousrigidflow(Bergen,Anandan,Hannaetal.1992)
and the update equations given bySzeliskiandShum (1997)andShumandSzeliski(2000).
9.1 Motion models
435
Figure 9.4 Four images taken with a hand-held camera registered using a 3D rotation mo-
tion model (SzeliskiandShum1997)  c 1997 ACM. Notice how the homographies, rather
than being arbitrary, have a well-defined keystone shape whose width increases away from
the origin.
9.1.4 Gap closing
The techniques presented in this section can be used to estimate a series of rotation matrices
and focal lengths, which can be chained together to create large panoramas. Unfortunately,
because of accumulated errors, this approach will rarely produce a closed 360
panorama.
Instead, there will invariably be either a gap or an overlap (Figure9.5).
We can solve this problem by matching the first image in the sequence with the last one.
The difference between the two rotation matrix estimates associated with the repeated first
indicates the amount of misregistration. This error can be distributed evenly across the whole
sequence by taking the quotient of the two quaternions associated with these rotations and
dividing this “error quaternion” by the number of images in the sequence (assumingrelatively
constant inter-frame rotations). We can also update the estimated focal length based on the
amount of misregistration. To do this, we first convert the error quaternion into a gap angle,
g
and then update the focal length using the equation f
0
=f(1   
g
=360
).
Figure9.5a shows the end of registered image sequence and the first image. There is a
big gap between the last image and the first which are in fact the same image. The gap is
32 because the wrong estimate of focal length (f = 510) was used. Figure9.5b shows the
registration after closing the gap with the correct focal length (f = 468). Notice that both
mosaics show very little visual misregistration (except at the gap), yet Figure9.5a has been
computedusinga focal lengththat has 9% error. Related approaches have been developed by
Hartley(1994b), McMillan and Bishop(1995), Stein(1995),and Kang and Weiss(1997)to
solve the focal length estimationproblem using pure panning motion and cylindrical images.
436
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 9.5 Gap closing (SzeliskiandShum1997)
c
1997 ACM: (a) A gap is visible when
the focal length is wrong (f = 510). (b) No gap is visible for the correct focal length
(f = 468).
Unfortunately, thisparticular gap-closingheuristiconly worksforthekindof “one-dimensional”
panorama where the camera is continuously turning inthe same direction. In Section9.2, we
describe a different approach to removing gaps and overlaps that works for arbitrary camera
motions.
9.1.5 Application: Video summarization and compression
Aninterestingapplication of image stitching is the ability to summarize and compress videos
taken with a panning camera. This application was first suggested byTeodosioandBender
(1993), who called their mosaic-based summaries salient stills. These ideas were then ex-
tendedbyIrani,Hsu,andAnandan (1995),Kumar,Anandan,Iranietal.(1995), andIraniand
Anandan(1998)toadditionalapplications,suchasvideocompressionandvideoindexing.
Whilethese earlyapproaches used affinemotionmodels and were therefore restricted tolong
focal lengths, the techniques were generalized byLee,geChen,lungBruceLinetal.(1997)
to full eight-parameter homographies and incorporated into the MPEG-4 video compression
standard, where the stitched background layers were called video sprites (Figure9.6).
While video stitching is in manyways a straightforwardgeneralization of multiple-image
stitching (Steedly,Pal,andSzeliski2005;Baudisch,Tan,Steedlyetal.2006), the potential
presence of large amounts of independent motion, camera zoom, and the desire to visualize
dynamic events impose additional challenges. For example, moving foreground objects can
often be removed using median filtering. Alternatively, foreground objects can be extracted
into a separate layer (SawhneyandAyer1996) and later composited back into the stitched
panoramas, sometimes as multiple instances togive the impressions of a “Chronophotograph”
9.1 Motion models
437
+
+
++
=
Figure 9.6 Video stitching the background scene to create a single sprite image that can be
transmitted and used to re-create the background in each frame (Lee,geChen,lungBruceLin
et al. 1997) c 1997IEEE.
(MasseyandBender1996) and sometimes as video overlays (IraniandAnandan1998).
Videos can also be used to create animated panoramic video textures (Section13.5.2), in
whichdifferent portions of a panoramic scene are animated withindependentlymoving video
loops (Agarwala,Zheng,Paletal.2005;Rav-Acha,Pritch,Lischinskietal.2005), or toshine
“video flashlights” onto a composite mosaic of a scene (Sawhney,Arpa,Kumaretal.2002).
Videocan also provide aninterestingsource of content for creatingpanoramas takenfrom
moving cameras. While this invalidates the usual assumption of a single point of view (opti-
cal center), interesting results can still be obtained. For example, the VideoBrush system of
Sawhney, Kumar, Gendel et al.(1998)usesthinstripstakenfromthecenteroftheimageto
create a panorama taken from a horizontally moving camera. This idea can be generalized
to other camera motions and compositing surfaces using the concept of mosaics on adap-
tive manifold (Peleg,Rousso,Rav-Achaetal.2000), and also used to generate panoramic
stereograms (Peleg, Ben-Ezra, andPritch2001). Related ideas have been used to create
panoramic matte paintings for multi-plane cel animation (Wood,Finkelstein,Hughesetal.
1997), forcreatingstitchedimagesofsceneswithparallax(Kumar, Anandan, Irani et al.
1995),andas3Drepresentationsofmorecomplexscenesusingmultiple-center-of-projection
images (RademacherandBishop1998) andmulti-perspective panoramas (Rom´an,Garg,and
Levoy 2004; Rom´an and Lensch 2006; Agarwala, Agrawala, Cohen et al. 2006).
Another interesting variant onvideo-basedpanoramasareconcentric mosaics (Section13.3.3)
(ShumandHe1999). Here, rather than trying to produce a singlepanoramic image, the com-
plete original video is kept and used to re-synthesize views (from different camera origins)
using ray remapping (light field rendering), thus endowing the panorama with a sense of 3D
438
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
p= (X,Y,Z)
x= (sin
θ
,h,cos
θ
)
θ
h
x
y
p= (X,Y,Z)
x= (sin
θ
cos
φ
, sin
φ
,
cos
θ
cos
φ
)
θ
φ
x
y
(a)
(b)
Figure 9.7 Projection from 3D to (a) cylindrical and (b) spherical coordinates.
depth. The same data set can also be used to explicitly reconstruct the depth using multi-
baseline stereo (Peleg,Ben-Ezra,andPritch2001;Li,Shum,Tangetal.2004;Zheng,Kang,
Cohen et al. 2007).
9.1.6 Cylindrical and spherical coordinates
Analternative tousinghomographies or 3Dmotions to alignimages istofirst warp theimages
intocylindrical coordinates and thenuse apure translationalmodel toalignthem (Chen1995;
Szeliski 1996).Unfortunately,thisonlyworksiftheimagesarealltakenwithalevelcamera
or with a known tilt angle.
Assume for now that the camera is in its canonical position, i.e., its rotation matrix is the
identity, R = I, so that the optical axis is aligned with the z axis and the y axis is aligned
vertically. The 3D ray corresponding to an (x;y) pixel is therefore (x;y;f).
We wish to project this image onto a cylindrical surface of unit radius (Szeliski1996).
Points on this surface are parameterized by anangle  anda height h, with the 3Dcylindrical
coordinates corresponding to (;h) given by
(sin;h;cos) / (x;y;f);
(9.12)
as shown in Figure9.7a. From this correspondence, we can compute the formula for the
warped or mapped coordinates (SzeliskiandShum1997),
x
0
= s = stan
1
x
f
;
(9.13)
y
0
= sh = s
y
p
x2 + f2
;
(9.14)
where s is anarbitrary scaling factor (sometimes called the radius of the cylinder) that canbe
set tos = f to minimize the distortion (scaling) near the center of the image.
5
The inverse of
Thescalecanalsobesettoalargerorsmallervalueforthefinalcompositingsurface,dependingonthedesired
output panoramaresolution—see Section9.3.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested