c# pdf reader table : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader SDK Library project winforms asp.net web page UWP SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft50-part626

10.2 High dynamic range imaging
479
Min
Max
R
R
Valid  Region
Min
Max
R
R
Valid  Region
(a)
(b)
Min
Max
R
R
Valid  Region
Min
Max
R
R
Valid  Region
(c)
(d)
Figure 10.9 Estimating the PSF without using a calibration pattern (Joshi, Szeliski, and
Kriegman 2008)
c
2008 IEEE:(a) Inputimage withblue cross-section (profile) location, (b)
Profile of sensedand predicted step edges, (c–d) Locations and values of the predicted colors
near the edge locations.
in Figure10.9d. For every pixel that is surrounded by a complete set of valid estimated
neighbors (green pixels in Figure10.9c), apply the least squares formula (10.1) to estimate
the kernel K. The resulting locally estimated PSFs can be used to correct for chromatic
aberration (since the relative displacements between per-channel PSFs can be computed), as
shown byJoshi,Szeliski,andKriegman (2008).
Exercise10.4 provides some more detailed instructions for implementing and testing
edge-based PSF estimation algorithms. An alternative approach, which does not require the
explicit detection of edges but uses image statistics (gradient distributions) instead, is pre-
sented byFergus,Singh,Hertzmannetal.(2006).
10.2 High dynamic range imaging
As we mentioned earlier in this chapter, registeredimages taken at different exposures canbe
used to calibrate the radiometric response function of a camera. More importantly, they can
help you create well-exposed photographs under challenging conditions, such as brightly lit
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages from pdf; acrobat export pages from pdf
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
480
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 10.10 Sample indoor image where the areas outside the window are overexposed
and inside the room are too dark.
1
1,500
25,000
400,000
2,000,000
Figure 10.11 Relative brightness of different scenes, ranging from 1 inside a dark room lit
by a monitor to 2,000,000 looking at the sun. Photos courtesy of Paul Debevec.
scenes where any single exposure contains saturated (overexposed) and dark (underexposed)
regions (Figure10.10). This problem is quite common, because the natural world contains a
range of radiance values that is far greater than can be captured with any photographic sensor
or film (Figure10.11). Taking a set of bracketed exposures (exposures taken by a camera
in automatic exposure bracketing (AEB) mode to deliberately under- and over-expose the
image) gives you the material from whichto create a properly exposedphotograph, as shown
in Figure10.12 (Reinhard,Ward,Pattanaiketal.2005;Freeman2008;GulbinsandGulbins
2009; Hasinoff, Durand, and Freeman 2010).
While it is possible to combine pixels from different exposures directly into a final com-
+
+
)
Figure 10.12 A bracketed set of shots (using the camera’s automatic exposure bracketing
(AEB) mode) and the resulting high dynamic range (HDR) composite.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete a page from a pdf in preview
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages from pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf
10.2 High dynamic range imaging
481
posite (BurtandKolczynski1993;Mertens,Kautz,andReeth2007), this approach runs the
risk of creating contrast reversals and halos. Instead, the more common approach is to pro-
ceed in three stages:
1. Estimate the radiometric response function from the aligned images.
2. Estimate a radiance map by selecting or blending pixels from different exposures.
3. Tone map the resulting high dynamic range (HDR) image back into a displayable
gamut.
The idea behind estimating the radiometric response function is relativelystraightforward
(MannandPicard1995;DebevecandMalik1997;MitsunagaandNayar1999;Reinhard,
Ward, Pattanaik et al. 2005). Supposeyoutakethreesetsofimagesatdifferentexposures
(shutter speeds), say at 2 exposure values.
11
If we were able to determine the irradiance
(exposure) E
i
at each pixel (2.101), we could plot it against the measured pixel value z
ij
for
each exposure time t
j
,as shown in Figure10.13.
Unfortunately, we do not know the irradiance values E
i
,so these have to be estimated
at the same time as the radiometric response function f, which can be written (Debevecand
Malik 1997)as
z
ij
=f(E
i
t
j
);
(10.3)
where t
j
is the exposure time for the jthimage. The inverse response curve f
1
is given by
f
1
(z
ij
)= E
i
t
j
:
(10.4)
Taking logarithms of both sides (base 2 is convenient, as we can now measure quantities in
EVs), we obtain
g(z
ij
)= logf
1
(z
ij
)= logE
i
+logt
j
;
(10.5)
where g = logf
1
(which maps pixel values z
ij
into log irradiance) is the curve we are
estimating (Figure10.13 turned on its side).
Debevec and Malik(1997)assumethattheexposuretimest
j
are known. (Recall that
these can be obtained from a camera’s EXIF tags, but that they actually follow a power of 2
progression :::;1=
128
;1=
64
;1=
32
1=
16
1=
8
;::: instead of the marked :::;1=
125
;1=
60
;1=
30
;
1=
15
;1=
8
;::: values—see Exercise2.5.) The unknowns are therefore the per-pixel exposures
E
i
and the response values g
k
= g(k), where g can be discretized according to the 256
pixel values commonly observed in eight-bit images. (The response curves are calibrated
separately for each color channel.)
11
Changing the shutter speed is preferable to changing the aperture, as thelattercan modify thevignetting and
focus. Using 2“f-stops”(technically,exposure values,or EVs,since f-stopsreferto apertures)is usually theright
compromisebetween capturing agood dynamic range and having properly exposed pixels everywhere.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete pages of pdf; delete a page from a pdf online
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page in pdf document; delete pages in pdf reader
482
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
log Exposure
Pixel value
3
1
2
log Exposure
Pixel value
Figure 10.13 Radiometric calibration using multiple exposures (DebevecandMalik1997).
Corresponding pixel values are plotted as functions of logexposures (irradiance). The curves
on the left are shifted to account for each pixel’s unknown radiance until they all line up into
asingle smooth curve.
In order to make the response curve smooth,DebevecandMalik(1997) add a second-
order smoothness constraint
X
k
g
00
(k)
2
=
X
[g(k   1)   2g(k) + g(k + 1)]
2
;
(10.6)
which is similar to the one used in snakes (5.3). Since pixel values are more reliable in the
middle of their range (and the g function becomes singular near saturation values), they also
adda weighting (hat) function w(k) that decays to zero at both ends of the pixelvalue range,
w(z) =
(
z  z
min
z (z
min
+z
max
)=2
z
max
z z > (z
min
+z
max
)=2:
(10.7)
Putting all of these terms together, they obtain a least squares problem in the unknowns
fg
k
gand fE
i
g,
E=
X
i
X
j
w(z
i;j
)[g(z
i;j
)  log E
i
logt
j
]
2
+
X
k
w(k)g
00
(k)
2
:
(10.8)
(In order to remove the overall shift ambiguity in the response curve and irradiance values,
the middle of the response curve is set to 0.)DebevecandMalik(1997) show how this can
be implemented in 21 lines of MATLAB code, which partially accounts for the popularity of
their technique.
WhileDebevecandMalik(1997) assume that the exposure times t
j
are known exactly,
there is no reason why these additional variables cannot be thrown into the least squares
problem, constraining their final estimated values to lie close to their nominal values
^
t
j
with
an extra term 
P
j
(t
j
^
t
j
)
2
.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages from pdf in reader; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete page on pdf file; delete page pdf online
10.2 High dynamic range imaging
483
(a)
(b)
Figure 10.14 Recovered response function and radiance image for a real digital camera
(DCS460) (DebevecandMalik1997)
c
1997 ACM.
Figure10.14 shows therecovered radiometricresponse functionfor a digital camera along
with select (relative) radiance values in the overall radiance map. Figure10.15 shows the
bracketed input images capturedon color film and the corresponding radiance map.
WhileDebevecandMalik(1997) use a general second-order smooth curve g to parame-
terize their response curve,MannandPicard(1995) use a three-parameter function
f(E) =  + E
;
(10.9)
whileMitsunagaandNayar(1999) use a low-order (N  10) polynomial for the inverse
response function g. Pal,Szeliski,Uyttendaeleetal.(2004) derive a Bayesian model that
estimates an independent smooth response function for each image, which can better model
the more sophisticated (and hence less predictable) automatic contrast and tone adjustment
performed in today’s digital cameras.
Once the response function has been estimated, the second step in creating high dynamic
range photographs is to merge the input images into a composite radiance map. If the re-
sponse function and images were known exactly, i.e., if they were noise free, you could use
any non-saturated pixel value to estimate the corresponding radiance by mapping it through
the inverse response curve E = g(z).
Unfortunately, pixels are noisy, especiallyunder low-light conditions whenfewer photons
arrive at the sensor. To compensate for this,MannandPicard(1995) use the derivative of
the response function as a weight in determining the final radiance estimate, since “flatter”
regions of the curve tell us less about the incoming irradiance. DebevecandMalik(1997)
use a hat function (10.7) which accentuates mid-tone pixels while avoiding saturated values.
Mitsunaga and Nayar(1999)showthatinordertomaximizethesignal-to-noiseratio(SNR),
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pages from a pdf; delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
delete pages pdf preview; delete page from pdf online
484
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 10.15 Bracketed set of exposures captured with a film camera and the resulting
radiance image displayed in pseudocolor (DebevecandMalik1997)  c 1997 ACM.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Figure 10.16 Merging multiple exposures tocreate ahigh dynamic range composite(Kang,
Uyttendaele, Winder et al. 2003):(a–c)threedifferentexposures;(d)mergingtheexposures
using classic algorithms (note the ghosting due to the horse’s head movement); (e) merging
the exposures with motion compensation.
10.2 High dynamic range imaging
485
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 10.17 HDR merging with large amounts of motion (Eden,Uyttendaele,andSzeliski
2006)
c
2006 IEEE: (a) registered bracketed input images; (b) results after the first pass of
imageselection: reference labels, image, andtone-mapped image; (c) results after the second
pass of image selection: final labels, compressed HDR image, and tone-mapped image
the weighting function must emphasize both higher pixel values and larger gradients in the
transfer function, i.e.,
w(z) = g(z)=g
0
(z);
(10.10)
where the weights w are used to form the final irradiance estimate
logE
i
=
P
j
w(z
ij
)[g(z
ij
)  logt
j
]
P
j
w(z
ij
)
:
(10.11)
Exercise10.1 has you implement one of the radiometric response function calibration tech-
niques and then use it to create radiance maps.
Under real-world conditions, casually acquired images may not be perfectly registered
and may contain moving objects.Ward(2003) uses a global (parametric) transform to align
the input images, whileKang,Uyttendaele,Winderetal.(2003) present an algorithm that
combines global registration with local motion estimation (optical flow) to accurately align
the images before blending their radiance estimates (Figure10.16). Since the images may
486
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 10.18 Fuji SuperCCDhigh dynamic range image sensor. The pairedlarge and small
active areas provide two different effective exposures.
havewidelydifferentexposures, caremust be takenwhenestimatingthe motions, whichmust
themselves be checked for consistency to avoid the creation of ghosts and object fragments.
Even this approach, however, may not work when the camera is simultaneously undergo-
ing large panning motions and exposure changes, which is a common occurrence in casually
acquired panoramas. Under such conditions, different parts of the image may be seen at one
or more exposures. Devising a method to blend all of these different sources while avoid-
ing sharp transitions and dealing with scene motion is a challenging problem. One approach
is to first find a consensus mosaic and to then selectively compute radiances in under- and
over-exposed regions (Eden,Uyttendaele,andSzeliski2006), as shown in Figure10.17.
Recently, some cameras, such as the Sony 550 and Pentax K-7, have started integrating
multiple exposure merging and tone mapping directly into the camera body. In the future,
the need to compute high dynamic range images from multiple exposures may be eliminated
by advances in camera sensor technology (Figure10.18) (Yang, ElGamal, Fowleretal.
1999; Nayar and Mitsunaga 2000; Nayar and Branzoi 2003; Kang, Uyttendaele, Winder et
al. 2003; Narasimhan and Nayar 2005; Tumblin, Agrawal, and Raskar 2005). However,the
need to blend suchimages and totone map them to lower-gamut displays is likely to remain.
HDR image formats. BeforewediscusstechniquesformappingHDRimagesbacktoa
displayable gamut, we should discuss the commonly used formats for storing HDR images.
If storage space is not an issue, storing each of the R, G, and B values as a 32-bit IEEE
floatis the best solution. The commonlyusedPortablePixMap(.ppm) format, whichsupports
both uncompressed ASCII and raw binary encodings of values, can be extended to a Portable
FloatMap (.pfm) format by modifying the header. TIFF also supports full floating point
values.
Amore compact representation is the Radiance format (.pic, .hdr) (Ward1994), which
uses a single common exponent and per-channel mantissas (10.19b). An intermediate encod-
10.2 High dynamic range imaging
487
96 bits / pixel
sign
n
exponent
mantissa
(a)
)
32 bits / pixel
red
green
blue
e
exponent
(b)
48 bits / pixel
sign exponent
nt
mantissa
(c)
)
Figure 10.19 HDR image encoding formats: (a) Portable PixMap (.ppm); (b) Radiance
(.pic, .hdr); (c) OpenEXR (.exr).
ing, OpenEXR from ILM,
12
uses 16-bit floats for each channel (10.19c), which is a format
supported natively on most modern GPUs. Ward(2004) describes these and other data for-
mats such as LogLuv (Larson1998) in more detail, as do the books byReinhard, Ward,
Pattanaik et al.(2005)and Freeman(2008).AnevenmorerecentHDRimageformatisthe
JPEG XR standard.13
10.2.1 Tone mapping
Once aradiancemap has beencomputed, it is usually necessarytodisplayiton alower gamut
(i.e., eight-bit) screen or printer. A varietyof tone mapping techniques has been developed for
this purpose, which involve either computing spatially varying transfer functions or reducing
image gradients tofit the available dynamic range (Reinhard,Ward,Pattanaiketal.2005).
The simplest way to compress a high dynamic range radiance image into a low dynamic
range gamut is to use a global transfer curve (Larson,Rushmeier,andPiatko1997). Fig-
ure10.20 shows one such example, where a gamma curve is usedtomapan HDR image back
12 http://www.openexr.net/.
13
http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-T.832-200903-I/en.
488
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 10.20 Global tone mapping: (a) input HDR image, linearly mapped; (b) gamma
applied to each color channel independently; (c) gamma applied to intensity (colors are
less washed out). Original HDR image courtesy of Paul Debevec, http://ict.debevec.org/
debevec/Research/HDR/. ProcessedimagescourtesyofFr´edoDurand, , MIT6.815/6.865
course on Computational Photography.
into a displayable gamut. If gammais appliedseparatelyto each channel(Figure10.20b), the
colors becomemuted(lesssaturated), since higher-valuedcolor channels contribute less(pro-
portionately) to the final color. Splitting the image up into its luminance and chrominance
(say, L*a*b*) components (Section2.3.2), applying the global mapping to the luminance
channel, and then reconstituting a color image works better (Figure10.20c).
Unfortunately, when the image has areally wide range of exposures, this globalapproach
still fails to preserve details in regions with widely varying exposures. What is needed, in-
stead, is somethingakin to the dodging and burning performedby photographers in the dark-
room. Mathematically, this is similar to dividing each pixel by the average brightness in a
region around that pixel.
Figure10.21 shows how this process works. As before, the image is split into its lumi-
nance and chrominance channels. The log luminance image
H(x;y) = logL(x;y)
(10.12)
is then low-pass filtered to produce a base layer
H
L
(x;y) = B(x;y)  H(x;y);
(10.13)
and a high-pass detail layer
H
H
(x;y) = H(x;y)   H
L
(x;y):
(10.14)
The base layer is then contrast reduced by scaling to the desired log-luminance range,
H
0
H
(x;y) = sH
H
(x;y)
(10.15)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested