c# pdf reader text : Delete pages from a pdf file SDK software service wpf winforms azure dnn SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft55-part631

10.7 Exercises
529
Ex 10.7: Super-resolution Implement one or more super-resolution algorithms and com-
pare their performance.
1. Take a set of photographs of the same scene using a hand-held camera (to ensure that
there is some jitter between the photographs).
2. Determine the PSF for the images you are trying to super-resolve using one of the
techniques in Exercise10.4.
3. Alternatively, simulate a collection of lower-resolution images by taking a high-quality
photograph (avoid those with compression artifacts) and applying your own pre-filter
kernel and downsampling.
4. Estimate the relative motion between the images using a parametric translation and
rotation motion estimation algorithm (Sections6.1.3 or8.2).
5. Implement a basic least squares super-resolution algorithm by minimizing the differ-
ence between the observed and downsampled images (10.2710.28).
6. Add in a gradient image prior, either as another least squares term or as a robust term
that can be minimized using iteratively reweighted least squares (AppendixA.3).
7. (Optional) Implement one of the example-based super-resolution techniques, where
matching against a set of exemplar images is used either to infer higher-frequency
information to be added to the reconstruction (Freeman, Jones, and Pasztor2002)
or higher-frequency gradients to be matched in the super-resolved image (Bakerand
Kanade 2002).
8. (Optional) Use local edge statistic information to improve the quality of the super-
resolved image (Fattal2007).
Ex 10.8: Image matting Developan algorithm for pullinga foreground mattefrom natural
images, as described in Section10.4.
1. Make sure thatthe images youaretakingare linearized(Exercise10.1andSection10.1)
and that your camera exposure is fixed (full manual mode), at least when taking multi-
ple shots of the same scene.
2. To acquire ground truth data, place your object in front of a computer monitor and
display a variety of solid background colors as well as some natural imagery.
3. Remove your object and re-display the same images to acquire known background
colors.
Delete pages from a pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages ipad; delete page pdf file
Delete pages from a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages on pdf; copy page from pdf
530
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
4. Use triangulationmatting (SmithandBlinn1996) to estimate the groundtruth opacities
and pre-multiplied foreground colors F for your objects.
5. Implement one or more of the natural image matting algorithms described in Sec-
tion10.4 and compare your results to the ground truth values you computed. Alter-
natively, use the matting test images publishedonhttp://alphamatting.com/.
6. (Optional) Run your algorithms on other images takenwith the same calibrated camera
(or other images you find interesting).
Ex 10.9: Smoke and shadow matting Extract smoke or shadow mattes from one scene
and insert them into another (Chuang,Agarwala, Curless etal. 2002;Chuang, Goldman,
Curless et al. 2003).
1. Take a still or video sequence of images withand without some intermittentsmoke and
shadows. (Remember to linearize your images before proceeding with any computa-
tions.)
2. For each pixel, fit a line to the observed color values.
3. If performing smoke matting, robustly compute the intersection of these lines to obtain
the smoke color estimate. Then, estimate the background color as the other extremum
(unless you already took a smoke-free background image).
If performing shadow matting, compute robust shadow (minimum) and lit (maximum)
values for each pixel.
4. Extract the smokeor shadow mattes from each frame as the fraction between these two
values (background and smoke or shadowedand lit).
5. Scan a new(destination) scene or modify the original backgroundwith animageeditor.
6. Re-insert the smoke or shadowmatte, alongwithanyother foregroundobjects youmay
have extracted.
7. (Optional) Using a series of cast stick shadows, estimate the deformation field for the
destination scene in order to correctly warp (drape) the shadows across the new ge-
ometry. (This is related to the shadow scanning technique developed byBouguetand
Perona(1999)andimplementedinExercise12.2.)
8. (Optional)Chuang,Goldman,Curlessetal.(2003) only demonstrated their technique
for planar source geometries. Can you extend their technique to capture shadows ac-
quiredfrom anirregular source geometry?
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
delete pdf pages in reader; delete page in pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete blank page in pdf
10.7 Exercises
531
9. (Optional) Can you change the direction of the shadow, i.e., simulate the effect of
changing the light source direction?
Ex 10.10: Texture synthesis Implement one of the texture synthesis or hole filling algo-
rithms presented in Section10.5. Here is one possible procedure:
1. Implement the basicEfrosandLeung (1999) algorithm, i.e., starting from the outside
(for hole filling) or inraster order (for texture synthesis), search for a similar neighbor-
hood in the source texture image, and copy that pixel.
2. Add in theWeiandLevoy(2000) extension of generating the pixels in a coarse-to-fine
fashion, i.e., generate a lower-resolution synthetic texture(or filled image), anduse this
as a guide for matching regions in the finer resolution version.
3. Add in theCriminisi,P´erez,andToyama(2004) idea of prioritizing pixels to be filled
by some function of the local structure (gradient or orientation strength).
4. Extend any of the above algorithms by selecting sub-blocks in the source texture and
using optimizationtodeterminetheseam betweenthe newblockandtheexisting image
that it overlaps (EfrosandFreeman2001).
5. (Optional) Implement one of the isophote (smooth continuation) inpainting algorithms
(Bertalmio,Sapiro,Casellesetal.2000;Telea2004).
6. (Optional) Add the ability to supply a target (reference) image (EfrosandFreeman
2001)ortoprovidesamplefilteredorunfiltered(referenceandrendered)images(Hertz-
mann, Jacobs, Oliver et al. 2001),seeSection10.5.2.
Ex 10.11: Colorization ImplementtheLevin,Lischinski,andWeiss(2004) colorizational-
gorithm thatissketchedoutin Section10.3.2andFigure10.37. Find somehistoric monochrome
photographs and some modern color ones. Write an interactive tool that lets you “pick” col-
ors from a modern photo and paint over the old one. Tune the algorithm parameters to give
you good results. Are you pleased with the results? Can you think of ways to make them
look more “antique”, e.g., with softer (less saturated and edgy) colors?
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
delete pages pdf document; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete page from pdf document; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
532
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
delete blank page in pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Compress large-size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a Delete unimportant contents: C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET
delete a page from a pdf online; delete pages pdf
Chapter 11
Stereo correspondence
11.1 Epipolar geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
11.1.1 Rectification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538
11.1.2 Plane sweep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540
11.2 Sparse correspondence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
11.2.1 3D curves and profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
11.3 Dense correspondence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545
11.3.1 Similarity measures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546
11.4 Local methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548
11.4.1 Sub-pixel estimation and uncertainty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550
11.4.2 Application: Stereo-based head tracking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
11.5 Global optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552
11.5.1 Dynamic programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554
11.5.2 Segmentation-based techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556
11.5.3 Application: Z-keyingand background replacement. . . . . . . . . . 558
11.6 Multi-view stereo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558
11.6.1 Volumetric and 3D surface reconstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
11.6.2 Shape from silhouettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
11.7 Additional reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570
11.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Number of Pages Demo Code in VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete page on pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
534
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
Figure 11.1 Stereo reconstruction techniques can convert (a–b) a pair of images into (c)
adepth map (http://vision.middlebury.edu/stereo/data/scenes2003/) or (d–e) a sequence of
images into (f) a 3D model (http://vision.middlebury.edu/mview/data/). (g) An analytical
stereo plotter, courtesy of Kenney Aerial Mapping, Inc., cangenerate (h) contour plots.
11 Stereo correspondence
535
Stereo matching is the process of taking two or more images and estimating a 3D model of
the scene by finding matching pixels in the images and converting their 2D positions into
3D depths. In Chapters67, we described techniques for recovering camera positions and
building sparse 3D models of scenes or objects. In this chapter, we address the question
of how to build a more complete 3D model, e.g., a sparse or dense depth map that assigns
relative depths to pixels in the input images. We also look at the topic of multi-view stereo
algorithms that produce complete 3D volumetric or surface-based object models.
Why are people interested in stereo matching? From the earliestinquiries into visual per-
ception, it was known that we perceive depth based onthe differences in appearance between
the left and right eye.
1
As a simple experiment, hold your finger vertically in front of your
eyes andcloseeacheyealternately. Youwillnotice thatthefinger jumps left and right relative
to the background of the scene. The same phenomenon is visible in the image pair shown in
Figure11.1a–b, inwhichtheforegroundobjects shift leftandright relative tothe background.
As we will shortly see, under simple imaging configurations (both eyes or cameras look-
ing straight ahead), the amount of horizontal motion or disparity is inversely proportional to
the distancefrom the observer. While the basic physics andgeometry relating visual disparity
to scene structure are well understood (Section11.1), automatically measuring this disparity
by establishing dense andaccurate inter-image correspondences is a challenging task.
The earliest stereo matching algorithms were developed in the field of photogrammetry
for automatically constructing topographic elevation maps from overlapping aerial images.
Prior to this, operators would use photogrammetric stereo plotters, which displayed shifted
versions of suchimages toeacheye and allowedthe operator tofloat a dotcursor aroundcon-
stant elevationcontours (Figure11.1g). The development of fullyautomated stereo matching
algorithms was a major advance in this field, enabling much more rapid and less expensive
processing of aerial imagery (Hannah1974;Hsieh,McKeown,andPerlant1992).
In computer vision, the topic of stereo matching has been one of the most widely stud-
ied and fundamental problems (MarrandPoggio1976;BarnardandFischler1982;Dhond
andAggarwal 1989; Scharstein andSzeliski 2002; Brown, Burschka, and Hager 2003; Seitz,
Curless, Diebel et al. 2006),andcontinuestobeoneofthemostactiveresearchareas.While
photogrammetric matching concentrated mainly on aerial imagery, computer vision applica-
tions include modeling the human visual system (Marr1982), robotic navigation and manip-
ulation (Moravec1983;Konolige1997;Thrun,Montemerlo,Dahlkampetal.2006), as well
as view interpolation and image-based rendering (Figure11.2a–d), 3D model building (Fig-
ure11.2e–f andh–j), and mixingliveactionwith computer-generatedimagery (Figure11.2g).
In this chapter, we describe the fundamental principles behind stereo matching, following
ThewordstereocomesfromtheGreekforsolid;stereovisionishowweperceivesolidshape(Koenderink
1990).
536
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
Figure 11.2 Applications of stereo vision: (a) input image, (b) computeddepth map, and(c)
new view generation from multi-view stereo (Matthies,Kanade,andSzeliski1989)
c
1989
Springer; (d) viewmorphing betweentwo images (SeitzandDyer1996)  c 1996 ACM;(e–f)
3D face modeling (images courtesy of Fr´ed´eric Devernay); (g) z-keying live and computer-
generated imagery (Kanade, Yoshida, Odaetal. 1996)
c
1996 IEEE; (h–j) building 3D
surface models from multiple video streams in Virtualized Reality (Kanade, Rander, and
Narayanan 1997).
11.1 Epipolar geometry
537
the general taxonomy proposed byScharsteinandSzeliski(2002). We begin in Section11.1
with a review of the geometry of stereo image matching, i.e., how to compute for a given
pixel in one image the range of possible locations the pixel might appear at in the other
image, i.e., its epipolar line. We describe how to pre-warp images so that corresponding
epipolar lines are coincident (rectification). We also describe a general resampling algorithm
called plane sweep that can be used to perform multi-image stereo matching with arbitrary
camera configurations.
Next, we briefly survey techniques for the sparse stereo matching of interest points and
edge-like features (Section11.2). We then turn to the main topic of this chapter, namely the
estimation of a dense set of pixel-wise correspondences in the form of a disparity map (Fig-
ure11.1c). This involves first selecting a pixel matching criterion (Section11.3) and then
using either local area-basedaggregation (Section11.4) or global optimization (Section11.5)
to help disambiguate potential matches. In Section11.6, we discuss multi-view stereo meth-
ods that aim to reconstruct a complete 3D model instead of just a single disparity image
(Figure11.1d–f).
11.1 Epipolar geometry
Given a pixel in one image, how can we compute its correspondence in the other image? In
Chapter8, we saw that a variety of search techniques can be used to match pixels based on
their local appearance as well as the motions of neighboring pixels. In the case of stereo
matching, however, we have some additionalinformationavailable, namelythe positions and
calibration data for the cameras that took the pictures of the same static scene (Section7.2).
How can we exploit this information to reduce the number of potential correspondences,
and hence both speed up the matching and increase its reliability? Figure11.3a shows how a
pixel in one image x
0
projects to an epipolar line segment in the other image. The segment
is bounded at one end by the projection of the original viewing ray at infinity p
1
and at the
other end by the projection of the original camera center c
0
into the second camera, which
is known as the epipole e
1
.If we project the epipolar line in the second image back into the
first, we get another line (segment), this time bounded by the other corresponding epipole
e
0
. Extending both line segments to infinity, we get a pair of corresponding epipolar lines
(Figure11.3b), which are the intersection of the two image planes with the epipolar plane
that passes through bothcamera centers c
0
and c
1
as well as the point of interest p (Faugeras
and Luong 2001; Hartley and Zisserman 2004).
538
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
p
x
1
x
0
(R,t)
p
e
1
e
0
c
0
c
1
epipolar plane
p
p
(R,t)
c
0
c
1
epipolar
lines
x
0
e
0
e
1
x
1
l
1
l
0
(a)
(b)
Figure 11.3 Epipolar geometry: (a) epipolar line segment corresponding to one ray; (b)
corresponding set of epipolar lines and their epipolar plane.
11.1.1 Rectification
As we saw in Section7.2, the epipolar geometry for a pair of cameras is implicit in the
relative pose and calibrations of the cameras, andcan easily be computed from seven or more
pointmatches usingthe fundamentalmatrix (or fiveor morepoints for the calibratedessential
matrix) (Zhang1998a,b;FaugerasandLuong2001;HartleyandZisserman2004). Once this
geometry has been computed, we can use the epipolar line corresponding to a pixel in one
image to constrain the search for corresponding pixels in the other image. One way todo this
is to use a general correspondence algorithm, such as optical flow (Section8.4), but to only
consider locations alongthe epipolar line (or to projectanyflowvectors thatfalloff backonto
the line).
Amore efficient algorithm can be obtained by first rectifying (i.e, warping) the input
images so that corresponding horizontal scanlines are epipolar lines (LoopandZhang1999;
Faugeras and Luong 2001; Hartley and Zisserman2004).
2
Afterwards, it is possible to match
horizontal scanlines independentlyor to shift images horizontally while computing matching
scores (Figure11.4).
Asimple way to rectify the two images is to first rotate both cameras so that they are
looking perpendicular to the line joining the camera centers c
0
and c
1
. Since there is a de-
gree of freedom in the tilt, the smallest rotations that achieve this should be used. Next, to
determine the desired twist around the optical axes, make the up vector (the camera y axis)
Thismakesmostsenseifthecamerasarenexttoeachother,althoughbyrotatingthecameras,rectificationcan
be performed on any pairthat is not verged too much orhas too much ofa scalechange. In those lattercases,using
planesweep(below)orhypothesizingsmall planarpatch locationsin 3D(Goesele,Snavely,Curlessetal.2007)may
be preferable.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested