c# pdf reader text : Delete pages pdf online application software utility azure windows html visual studio SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft58-part634

11.6 Multi-view stereo
559
Figure 11.14 Background replacement using z-keying with a bi-layer segmentation algo-
rithm (Kolmogorov,Criminisi,Blakeetal.2006)  c 2006 IEEE.
creating complete 3D object models, butalso simpler techniques for improving the quality of
depth maps using multiple source images.
As we saw in our discussion of plane sweep (Section11.1.2), it is possible to resample
all neighboring k images at each disparity hypothesis d into a generalized disparity space
volume
~
I(x;y;d;k). The simplestwayto takeadvantage of these additionalimages is to sum
up their differences from the reference image I
r
as in (11.4),
C(x;y;d) =
X
k
(
~
I(x;y;d;k)   I
r
(x;y)):
(11.15)
This is the basis of the well-known sum of summed-squared-difference (SSSD) and SSAD
approaches (OkutomiandKanade1993;Kang,Webb,Zitnicketal.1995), which can be ex-
tended to reason about likely patterns of occlusion (Nakamura,Matsuura,Satohetal.1996).
More recent work byGallup,Frahm,Mordohaietal.(2008) show how to adapt the base-
lines used to the expected depth in order to get the best tradeoff between geometric accuracy
(wide baseline) and robustness to occlusion (narrow baseline). Alternative multi-view cost
metrics include measures suchas synthetic focus sharpness and the entropy of the pixel color
distribution (Vaish,Szeliski,Zitnicketal.2006).
Auseful way to visualize the multi-frame stereo estimation problem is to examine the
epipolar plane image (EPI) formed by stacking corresponding scanlines from all the images,
as shown in Figures8.13c and11.15 (Bolles,Baker,andMarimont1987;BakerandBolles
1989; Baker 1989).AsyoucanseeinFigure11.15,asacameratranslateshorizontally(ina
standard horizontally rectified geometry), objects at different depths move sideways at a rate
inversely proportionaltotheir depth (11.1).
6
Foregroundobjects occlude backgroundobjects,
which can be seen as EPI-strips (Criminisi,Kang,Swaminathanetal.2005) occluding other
6
Thefour-dimensional generalization ofthe EPI is the light field, which we study in Section13.3. In principle,
Delete pages pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages pdf preview
Delete pages pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf acrobat
560
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
A
E
D
C
B
left
middle
right
F
x
t
(a)
(b)
Figure 11.15 Epipolar planeimage(EPI) (Gortler,Grzeszczuk,Szeliskietal.1996)  c 1996
ACManda schematic EPI (Kang,Szeliski,andChai2001)  c 2001IEEE. (a) The Lumigraph
(light field) (Section13.3) is the 4Dspace of all lightrays passingthrough a volume of space.
Taking a 2D slice results in all of the light rays embedded in a plane and is equivalent to a
scanline taken from a stacked EPI volume. Objects at different depths move sideways with
velocities (slopes) proportional to their inverse depth. Occlusion (and translucency) effects
can easily be seen in this representation. (b) The EPI corresponding to Figure11.16 showing
the three images (middle, left, and right) as slices through the EPI volume. The spatially and
temporally shifted window around the black pixel is indicated by the rectangle, showing the
right image is not being used in matching.
strips in the EPI. If we are given a dense enough set of images, we can find such strips and
reason about their relationships inorder toboth reconstructthe3D scene and makeinferences
about translucent objects (Tsin,Kang,andSzeliski2006) and specular reflections (Swami-
nathan, Kang, Szeliski et al. 2002; Criminisi, Kang, Swaminathan et al. 2005).Alternatively,
we can treat the series of images as a set of sequential observations and merge them using
Kalman filtering (Matthies,Kanade,andSzeliski1989) or maximum likelihood inference
(Cox1994).
When fewer images are available, it becomes necessary to fall back on aggregation tech-
niques such as sliding windows or global optimization. With additional input images, how-
ever, the likelihood of occlusions increases. It is therefore prudent to adjust not only the best
window locations using a shiftable window approach, as shown in Figure11.16a, but also to
optionally select a subset of neighboring frames in order to discount those images where the
region of interest is occluded, as shown in Figure11.16b (Kang,Szeliski,andChai2001).
thereisenough information in alight field to recoverboth theshapeand theBRDFofobjects (Soatto,Yezzi,andJin
2003),althoughrelativelylittleprogresshasbeenmadetodateonthistopic.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page from pdf file; delete page pdf file reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete pages of pdf
11.6 Multi-view stereo
561
A
B
C
D
E
F
A
B
C
D
E
F
A
B
C
D
E
F
left
middle
right
A
B
C
D
E
F
A
B
C
D
E
F
A
B
C
D
E
F
left
middle
right
(a)
(b)
Figure 11.16 Spatio-temporallyshiftable windows (Kang,Szeliski,andChai2001)  c 2001
IEEE: A simple three-image sequence (the middle image is the reference image), which has
amoving frontal gray square (marked F) and a stationary background. Regions B, C, D, and
Eare partially occluded. (a) A regular SSD algorithm will make mistakes when matching
pixels in these regions (e.g. the window centered on the black pixel in region B) and in
windows straddling depth discontinuities (the window centered on the white pixel in region
F). (b) Shiftable windows help mitigate the problems in partially occluded regions and near
depth discontinuities. The shifted window centered on the white pixel in region F matches
correctly in all frames. The shifted window centered on the black pixel in region B matches
correctlyin the leftimage, but requires temporalselection to disable matchingthe rightimage.
Figure11.15bshows an EPI corresponding tothis sequence and describes in more detailhow
temporal selection works.
Figure11.15b shows how such spatio-temporal selection or shifting of windows corresponds
to selecting the most likely un-occluded volumetric region in the epipolar plane image vol-
ume.
Theresults of applyingthese techniques to the multi-frame flower gardenimagesequence
are shown in Figure11.17, which compares the results of using regular (non-shifted) SSSD
with spatially shifted windows and full spatio-temporal window selection. (The task of
applying stereo to a rigid scene filmed with a moving camera is sometimes called motion
stereo). Similar improvements from using spatio-temporal selection are reported by (Kang
and Szeliski 2004)andareevidentevenwhenlocalmeasurementsarecombinedwithglobal
optimization.
While computing a depth map from multiple inputs outperforms pairwise stereo match-
ing, even more dramatic improvements can be obtained by estimating multiple depth maps
simultaneously (Szeliski1999;KangandSzeliski2004). The existence of multiple depth
maps enables more accurate reasoning about occlusions, as regions which are occluded in
one image may be visible (and matchable) in others. The multi-view reconstruction problem
can be formulated as the simultaneous estimation of depth maps at key frames (Figure8.13c)
whilemaximizing not onlyphotoconsistencyandpiecewisedisparity smoothness butalso the
consistency between disparity estimates at different frames. WhileSzeliski(1999) andKang
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete page on pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf files
562
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 11.17 Local (5  5window-based) matching results (Kang,Szeliski,andChai2001)
c
2001 IEEE: (a) window that is not spatially perturbed (centered); (b) spatially perturbed
window; (c) using the best five of 10 neighboring frames; (d) using the better half sequence.
Notice how the results near the tree trunkare improved using temporal selection.
andSzeliski(2004)usesoft(penalty-based)constraintstoencouragemultipledisparitymaps
to be consistent,KolmogorovandZabih(2002) show how such consistency measures can
be encoded as hard constraints, which guarantee that the multiple depth maps are not only
similar but actually identical in overlapping regions. Newer algorithms that simultaneously
estimate multiple disparity maps include papers byMaitre,Shinagawa,andDo(2008) and
Zhang, Jia, Wong et al.(2008).
Aclosely related topic to multi-frame stereo estimation is scene flow, in which multiple
cameras are used to capture a dynamic scene. The task is then to simultaneously recover the
3D shape of the object at every instant in time and to estimate the full 3D motion of every
surface point between frames. Representative papers in this area include those byVedula,
Baker, Rander et al.(2005), Zhang and Kambhamettu(2003), Pons, Keriven, and Faugeras
(2007),HuguetandDevernay(2007), andWedel,Rabe,Vaudreyetal.(2008). Figure11.18a
shows an image of the 3D scene flow for the tango dancer shown in Figure11.2h–j, while
Figure11.18b shows 3D scene flows captured from a moving vehicle for the purpose of
obstacle avoidance. In addition to supporting mensuration and safety applications, scene
flow can be used to support both spatial and temporal view interpolation (Section13.5.4), as
demonstrated byVedula,Baker,andKanade(2005).
11.6.1 Volumetric and 3D surface reconstruction
According toSeitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006):
The goal of multi-view stereo is to reconstruct a complete 3D object model from
acollection of images taken from known camera viewpoints.
The most challenging but potentially most useful variant of multi-viewstereo reconstruc-
tion is to create globally consistent 3D models. This topic has a long history in computer
vision, starting with surface mesh reconstruction techniques such as the one developed by
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
11.6 Multi-view stereo
563
Avery important feature to extract from a moving scene is the velocity of visible
objects. In the scope of the human nerve system such perception of motion is
referred to as kinaesthesia. The motion in 3D space is called scene flow and can
be described by a three-dimensional velocity field.
Fig.1. Scene flow example. Despite similar distance from the viewer, the moving car
(red) can be clearly distinguished from the parked vehicles (green).
D. Forsyth, P. Torr, and A. Zisserman (Eds.): ECCV 2008, Part I, LNCS 5302, pp.739–751, 2008.
cSpringer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008
(a)
(b)
Figure 11.18 Three-dimensional scene flow: (a) computed from a multi-camera dome sur-
rounding the dancer shown in Figure11.2h–j (Vedula,Baker,Randeretal.2005)  c 2005
IEEE; (b) computed from stereo cameras mounted on a moving vehicle (Wedel,Rabe,Vau-
drey et al. 2008)
c
2008 Springer.
Fua and Leclerc(1995)(Figure11.19a). Avarietyofapproachesandrepresentationshave
been used to solve this problem, including 3D voxel representations (SeitzandDyer1999;
Szeliski andGolland1999; De Bonetand Viola 1999; Kutulakos andSeitz2000;Eisert, Stein-
bach, andGirod2000;Slabaugh, Culbertson, Slabaugh etal. 2004; Sinha and Pollefeys 2005;
Vogiatzis, Hernandez, Torr et al. 2007; Hiep, Keriven, Pons et al. 2009),levelsets(Faugeras
and Keriven 1998; Pons, Keriven, and Faugeras 2007),polygonalmeshes(Fua and Leclerc
1995; Narayanan, Rander, and Kanade 1998; Hernandez and Schmitt 2004; Furukawa and
Ponce 2009),andmultipledepthmaps(Kolmogorov and Zabih 2002). Figure11.19shows
representative examples of 3D object models reconstructed using some of these techniques.
In order to organize and compare all these techniques,Seitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006)
developed a six-point taxonomy that can help classify algorithms according to the scene rep-
resentation, photoconsistency measure, visibility model, shape priors, reconstruction algo-
rithm, and initialization requirements they use. Below, we summarize some of these choices
and list a few representative papers. For more details, please consult the full survey paper
(Seitz,Curless,Diebeletal.2006) and the evaluation Web site,http://vision.middlebury.edu/
mview/,whichcontainspointerstoevenmorerecentpapersandresults.
Scene representation. Oneofthemorepopular3Drepresentationsisauniformgridof3D
voxels,
7
which can be reconstructed using a variety of carving (SeitzandDyer1999;Kutu-
lakos and Seitz 2000)oroptimization(Sinha and Pollefeys 2005; Vogiatzis, Hernandez, Torr
et al. 2007; Hiep, Keriven, Pons et al. 2009)techniques.Levelsettechniques(Section5.1.4)
also operate on a uniform grid but, instead of representing a binary occupancy map, they
represent the signed distance to the surface (FaugerasandKeriven1998;Pons,Keriven,and
Faugeras 2007),whichcanencodeafinerlevelofdetail.Polygonalmeshesareanotherpop-
7Foroutdoorscenesthatgotoinfinity,anon-uniformgriddingofspacemaybepreferable(Slabaugh,Culbertson,
Slabaugh et al.2004).
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page pdf acrobat reader; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete pages from pdf acrobat
564
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
Figure 11.19 Multi-view stereo algorithms: (a) surface-based stereo (Fua andLeclerc
1995); (b)voxelcoloring(Seitz and Dyer 1999)
c
1999 Springer; (c) depth map merg-
ing (Narayanan, Rander, andKanade1998); (d) level set evolution (FaugerasandKeriven
1998) c 1998IEEE;(e)silhouetteandstereofusion(Hernandez and Schmitt 2004) c 2004
Elsevier; (f) multi-view image matching (Pons,Keriven,andFaugeras2005)
c
2005 IEEE;
(g) volumetric graph cut (Vogiatzis,Torr,andCipolla2005)  c 2005 IEEE; (h) carved visual
hulls (FurukawaandPonce2009)  c 2009 Springer.
ular representation (FuaandLeclerc1995;Narayanan, Rander,andKanade1998;Isidoro
and Sclaroff 2003; Hernandez and Schmitt 2004; Furukawa and Ponce 2009; Hiep, Keriven,
Pons et al. 2009). Meshesarethestandardrepresentationusedincomputergraphicsand
also readily support the computation of visibility and occlusions. Finally, as we discussed in
the previous section, multiple depth maps can also be used (Szeliski1999;Kolmogorovand
Zabih 2002;Kang and Szeliski 2004).Manyalgorithmsalsousemorethanasinglerepresen-
tation, e.g., theymaystart by computing multiple depth maps and then merge them into a 3D
object model (Narayanan,Rander,andKanade1998;FurukawaandPonce2009;Goesele,
Curless, and Seitz 2006; Goesele, Snavely, Curless et al. 2007; Furukawa, Curless, Seitz et
al. 2010).
11.6 Multi-view stereo
565
Photoconsistency measure. Aswediscussedin(Section11.3.1), avarietyofsimilarity
measures can be used to compare pixel values in different images, including measures that
try to discount illumination effects or be less sensitive to outliers. In multi-view stereo, algo-
rithms havea choice of computingthesemeasures directlyonthe surface of the model, i.e., in
scene space, or projecting pixel values from one image (or from a textured model) back into
another image, i.e., in image space. (The latter corresponds more closely to a Bayesian ap-
proach, since input images are noisy measurements of the colored 3D model.) The geometry
of the object, i.e., its distance toeachcameraandits localsurfacenormal, whenavailable, can
beusedtoadjust the matching windows usedinthecomputationtoaccountfor foreshortening
and scale change (Goesele,Snavely,Curlessetal.2007).
Visibilitymodel. Abigadvantagethatmulti-viewstereoalgorithmshaveoversingle-depth-
map approaches is their ability to reason in a principled manner about visibility and occlu-
sions. Techniques that use the current state of the 3D model to predict which surface pixels
are visible in each image (KutulakosandSeitz2000;FaugerasandKeriven1998;Vogiatzis,
Hernandez, Torr etal. 2007; Hiep, Keriven, Pons etal. 2009)areclassifiedasusinggeometric
visibility models in the taxonomy ofSeitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006). Techniques that se-
lect a neighboring subset of image to match are called quasi-geometric (Narayanan,Rander,
and Kanade 1998; Kang and Szeliski 2004; Hernandez and Schmitt 2004),whiletechniques
that use traditional robust similarity measures are called outlier-based. While full geometric
reasoning is the most principled and accurate approach, it can be very slow to evaluate and
depends on the evolving qualityof the current surface estimateto predictvisibility, which can
be a bit of a chicken-and-egg problem, unless conservative assumptions are used, as they are
byKutulakosandSeitz(2000).
Shape priors. Becausestereomatchingisoftenunderconstrained, especiallyintexture-
less regions, most matching algorithms adopt (either explicitly or implicitly) some form of
prior model for the expected shape. Many of the techniques that rely on optimization use a
3Dsmoothness or area-based photoconsistency constraint, which, because of the natural ten-
dencyof smoothsurfaces toshrinkinwards, often results ina minimalsurfaceprior (Faugeras
and Keriven 1998; Sinha and Pollefeys 2005; Vogiatzis, Hernandez, Torr et al. 2007). Ap-
proaches that carve away the volume of space often stop once a photoconsistent solution is
found (SeitzandDyer1999;KutulakosandSeitz2000), whichcorresponds to amaximal sur-
face bias, i.e., these techniques tend to over-estimate the true shape. Finally, multiple depth
map approaches often adopt traditionalimage-based smoothness (regularization) constraints.
Reconstruction algorithm. Thedetails ofhowtheactualreconstructionalgorithm pro-
ceeds is where the largest variety—and greatest innovation—in multi-view stereo algorithms
566
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
can be found.
Some approaches use global optimization defined over a three-dimensional photoconsis-
tency volume to recover a complete surface. Approaches basedon graph cuts use polynomial
complexity binary segmentation algorithms to recover the object model defined on the voxel
grid (SinhaandPollefeys2005;Vogiatzis,Hernandez,Torretal.2007;Hiep,Keriven,Pons
et al. 2009). Levelsetapproachesuseacontinuoussurfaceevolutiontofindagoodmini-
mum in the configuration space of potentialsurfaces andtherefore require a reasonablygood
initialization (FaugerasandKeriven1998;Pons,Keriven,andFaugeras2007). In order for
the photoconsistency volume to be meaningful, matching costs need to be computed in some
robust fashion, e.g., using sets of limited views or by aggregating multiple depth maps.
An alternative approach to global optimization is to sweep through the 3D volume while
computingboth photoconsistencyandvisibilitysimultaneously. Thevoxel coloringalgorithm
ofSeitzandDyer(1999) performs a front-to-back plane sweep. On every plane, any voxels
that are sufficiently photoconsistent are labeled as part of the object. The corresponding
pixels in the source images can then be “erased”, since they are already accounted for, and
therefore do not contribute to further photoconsistency computations. (A similar approach,
albeit without the front-to-back sweep order, is used bySzeliskiandGolland (1999).) The
resulting 3D volume, under noise- and resampling-free conditions, is guaranteed to produce
both aphotoconsistent 3D modelandto enclose whatever true 3D object modelgenerated the
images.
Unfortunately, voxel coloring is only guaranteed to work if all of the cameras lie on the
same side of thesweepplanes, whichis notpossibleingeneralringconfigurations of cameras.
Kutulakos and Seitz(2000)generalizevoxelcoloringtospacecarving, wheresubsetsof
cameras that satisfy the voxel coloring constraint are iteratively selected and the 3D voxel
grid is alternately carved away along different axes.
Another popular approach tomulti-view stereois to first independently compute multiple
depth maps and then merge these partial maps into a complete 3D model. Approaches to
depth map merging, which are discussed in more detail in Section12.2.1, include signed
distance functions (CurlessandLevoy1996), used byGoesele,Curless,andSeitz(2006),
and Poisson surface reconstruction (Kazhdan,Bolitho,andHoppe2006), used byGoesele,
Snavely, Curless et al.(2007).Itisalsopossibletoreconstructsparserrepresentations,such
as 3D points and lines, and to interpolate them to full 3D surfaces (Section12.3.1) (Taylor
2003).
Initialization requirements. OnefinalelementdiscussedbySeitz,Curless,Diebeletal.
(2006) is the varying degrees of initialization required by different algorithms. Because some
algorithms refine or evolve a rough 3D model, they require a reasonably accurate (or over-
complete) initial model, which can often be obtained byreconstructing a volume from object
11.6 Multi-view stereo
567
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Figure 11.20 The multi-view stereodatasets captured bySeitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006)
c 2006Springer. Only (a) and (b) are currently used for evaluation.
silhouettes, as discussed in Section11.6.2. However, if the algorithm performs a global op-
timization (Kolev,Klodt,Broxetal.2009;KolevandCremers2009), this dependence on
initializationis not an issue.
Empirical evaluation. Inordertoevaluatethelargenumberofdesignalternativesinmulti-
view stereo,Seitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006) collected a dataset of calibratedimages using
aspherical gantry. A representative image from each of the six datasets is shown in Fig-
ure11.20, although only the first two datasets have as yet been fully processed and used for
evaluation. Figure11.21 shows the results of running seven different algorithms on the tem-
ple dataset. As you cansee, most of the techniques do an impressive job of capturing the fine
details in the columns, although it is also clear that the techniques employ differing amounts
of smoothing toachieve these results.
Since the publication of the survey bySeitz,Curless,Diebeletal.(2006), the field of
multi-view stereo has continued to advance at a rapid pace (Strecha, Fransens, andVan
Gool 2006; Hernandez, Vogiatzis, and Cipolla 2007;Habbecke and Kobbelt 2007; Furukawa
and Ponce 2007; Vogiatzis, Hernandez, Torr et al. 2007; Goesele, Snavely, Curless et al.
2007; Sinha, Mordohai, and Pollefeys 2007; Gargallo, Prados, and Sturm 2007; Merrell, Ak-
barzadeh, Wang et al. 2007; Zach, Pock, and Bischof 2007b; Furukawa and Ponce 2008;
Hornung, Zeng, and Kobbelt 2008; Bradley, Boubekeur, and Heidrich 2008; Zach 2008;
Campbell, Vogiatzis, Hern
´
andez et al. 2008; Kolev, Klodt, Brox et al. 2009; Hiep, Keriven,
Pons etal. 2009; Furukawa, Curless, Seitz et al. 2010).Themulti-viewstereoevaluationsite,
http://vision.middlebury.edu/mview/,providesquantitativeresultsforthesealgorithmsalong
with pointers to where to find these papers.
11.6.2 Shape from silhouettes
In many situations, performing a foreground–background segmentation of the object of in-
terest is a good way to initialize or fit a 3D model (Grauman,Shakhnarovich,andDarrell
568
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 11.21 Reconstruction results (details) for seven algorithms (HernandezandSchmitt
2004; Furukawa and Ponce 2009; Pons, Keriven, and Faugeras 2005; Goesele, Curless, and
Seitz 2006; Vogiatzis, Torr, and Cipolla 2005; Tran and Davis 2002; Kolmogorov and Zabih
2002)evaluatedby Seitz, Curless, Diebel et al.(2006)onthe47-imageTempleRingdataset.
The numbers underneath each detail image are the accuracyof each of these techniques mea-
sured in millimeters.
2003; Vlasic, Baran, Matusik et al. 2008)ortoimposeaconvexsetofconstraintsonmulti-
view stereo (KolevandCremers2008). Over the years, a number of techniques have been
developed to reconstruct a 3D volumetric model from the intersection of the binary silhou-
ettes projected into 3D. The resulting model is called a visual hull (or sometimes a line hull),
analogous with the convex hull of a set of points, since the volume is maximal with respect
to the visual silhouettes and surface elements are tangent to the viewing rays (lines) along
the silhouette boundaries (Laurentini1994). It is also possible to carve away a more accu-
rate reconstruction using multi-view stereo (SinhaandPollefeys2005) or by analyzing cast
shadows (Savarese,Andreetto,Rushmeieretal.2007).
Some techniques first approximate each silhouette with a polygonal representation and
then intersect the resulting facetedconical regions in three-space to produce polyhedral mod-
els (Baumgart1974;MartinandAggarwal1983;Matusik, Buehler, andMcMillan2001),
which can later be refined using triangular splines (SullivanandPonce1998). Other ap-
proaches use voxel-based representations, usually encoded as octrees (Samet1989), because
of the resulting space–time efficiency. Figures11.22a–b show an example of a 3D octree
model and its associated colored tree, where black nodes are interior to the model, white
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested