c# pdf reader text : Delete pages from pdf file online Library software component asp.net winforms .net mvc SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft61-part638

12.2 Active rangefinding
589
rithm, which alternates between finding the closest point matches between the two surfaces
beingaligned and then solving a3D absolute orientation problem (Section6.1.5, (6.316.32)
(BeslandMcKay1992;ChenandMedioni1992;Zhang1994;SzeliskiandLavall´ee1996;
Gold, Rangarajan, Lu et al. 1998; David, DeMenthon, Duraiswami et al. 2004; Li and Hart-
ley 2007; Enqvist, Josephson, and Kahl 2009).
3
Since the two surfaces being aligned usually
only have partial overlap and may also have outliers, robust matching criteria (Section6.1.4
and AppendixB.3) are typically used. In order to speed up the determination of the closest
point, and also to make the distance-to-surface computation more accurate, one of the two
point sets (e.g., the current merged model) can be converted into a signed distance function,
optionally represented using an octree spline for compactness (Lavall´eeandSzeliski1995).
Variants on the basic ICP algorithm can be used to register 3D point sets under non-rigid de-
formations, e.g., for medical applications (FeldmarandAyache1996;SzeliskiandLavall´ee
1996). Colorvaluesassociatedwiththepointsorrangemeasurementscanalsobeusedas
part of the registration process to improve robustness (JohnsonandKang1997;Pulli1999).
Unfortunately, the ICP algorithm andits variants can onlyfinda locally optimalalignment
between 3D surfaces. If this is not known a priori, more global correspondence or search
techniques, based on local descriptors invariant to 3D rigid transformations, need to be used.
An example of such a descriptor is the spin image, which is a local circular projection of a
3D surface patch around the local normal axis (JohnsonandHebert1999). Another (earlier)
example is the splash representation introduced bySteinandMedioni(1992).
Once twoor more 3D surfaces havebeenaligned, theycan be merged intoa singlemodel.
One approach is to represent each surface using a triangulated mesh and combine these
meshes using a process that is sometimes called zippering (SoucyandLaurendeau1992;
Turk and Levoy 1994). Another,nowmorewidelyused,approachistocomputeasigned
distance function that fits all of the 3D data points (Hoppe,DeRose,Duchampetal.1992;
Curless and Levoy 1996; Hilton, Stoddart, Illingworth etal. 1996; Wheeler, Sato, andIkeuchi
1998).
Figure12.8 shows one such approach, the volumetric range image processing (VRIP)
technique developed byCurlessandLevoy(1996), which first computes a weighted signed
distance function from each range image and then merges them using a weighted averaging
process. To make the representation more compact, run-length coding is used to encode
the empty, seen, and varying (signed distance) voxels, and only the signed distance values
near each surface are stored.
4
Once the merged signed distance function has been computed,
azero-crossing surface extraction algorithm, such as marching cubes (LorensenandCline
1987),canbeusedtorecoverameshedsurfacemodel.Figure12.9showsanexampleofthe
3
Sometechniques,such as theone developed byChenandMedioni(1992),uselocal surfacetangent planes to
make this computation more accurateand to accelerateconvergence.
4
An alternative,even morecompact,representation could beto use octrees (Lavall´eeandSzeliski1995).
Delete pages from pdf file online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
Delete pages from pdf file online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pdf pages ipad; cut pages from pdf
590
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 12.8 Range data merging (CurlessandLevoy1996)
c
1996 ACM: (a) two signed
distance functions (top left) are merged with their (weights) bottom left to produce a com-
binedset of functions (rightcolumn) from whichanisosurface canbeextracted(greendashed
line); (b) the signed distance functions are combined with empty and unseen space labels to
fill holes in the isosurface.
complete range data merging and isosurface extraction pipeline.
Volumetric range data merging techniques based on signed distance or characteristic
(inside–outside) functions are also widely usedto extract smooth well-behaved surfaces from
orientedor unoriented sets of points(Hoppe,DeRose,Duchampetal.1992;Ohtake,Belyaev,
Alexa et al. 2003; Kazhdan, Bolitho, and Hoppe 2006; Lempitsky and Boykov 2007; Zach,
Pock, and Bischof 2007b; Zach 2008),asdiscussedinmoredetailinSection12.5.1.
12.2.2 Application: Digital heritage
Active rangefinding technologies, combined with surface modeling and appearance model-
ing techniques (Section12.7), are widely used in the fields of archeological and historical
preservation, which often also goes under the name digital heritage (MacDonald2006). In
such applications, detailed 3D models of cultural objects are acquired and later used for ap-
plications such as analysis, preservation, restoration, and the production of duplicate artwork
(RiouxandBird1993).
Amore recent example of such an endeavor is the Digital Michelangeloproject ofLevoy,
Pulli, Curless et al.(2000), whichusedCyberwarelaserstripescanners andhigh-quality
digital SLR cameras mounted on a large gantry to obtain detailed scans of Michelangelo’s
David and other sculptures in Florence. The project also took scans of the Forma Urbis
Romae, an ancient stone map of Rome that had shattered into pieces, for which newmatches
were obtained using digital techniques. The whole process, from initial planning, tosoftware
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
delete page from pdf reader; delete pages pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various
delete page in pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
12.3 Surface representations
591
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d
)
(e)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Figure 12.9 Reconstruction and hardcopy of the “Happy Buddha” statuette (Curlessand
Levoy 1996) c 1996ACM:(a)photographoftheoriginalstatueafterspraypaintingwith
matte gray; (b) partialrange scan; (c) merged range scans; (d) colored rendering of the recon-
structed model; (e) hardcopy of the model constructed using stereolithography.
development, acquisition, andpost-processing, tookseveralyears (and many volunteers), and
produced a wealth of 3D shape and appearance modeling techniques as a result.
Even larger-scale projects are now being attempted, for example, the scanning of com-
plete temple sites such as Angkor-Thom (IkeuchiandSato2001;IkeuchiandMiyazaki2007;
Banno, Masuda, Oishi et al. 2008).Figure12.10showsdetailsfromthisproject,includinga
sample photograph, a detailed 3D (sculptural) head model scanned from groundlevel, andan
aerial overview of the final merged 3D site model, which was acquired using a balloon.
12.3 Surface representations
In previous sections, we have seen different representations being used to integrate 3D range
scans. We now look at several of these representations in more detail. Explicit surface
representations, such as triangle meshes, splines (Farin1992,1996), and subdivision sur-
faces (Stollnitz,DeRose,andSalesin1996;Zorin,Schr¨oder,andSweldens1996;Warrenand
Weimer 2001; Peters and Reif 2008),enablenotonlythecreationofhighlydetailedmodels
but also processing operations, such as interpolation (Section12.3.1), fairing or smoothing,
and decimation and simplification (Section12.3.2). We also examine discrete point-based
representations (Section12.4) and volumetric representations (Section12.5).
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a
delete page in pdf online; add or remove pages from pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf document
592
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 12.10 Laser range modeling of the Bayon temple at Angkor-Thom (Banno,Masuda,
Oishi et al. 2008) c 2008Springer:(a)samplephotographfromthesite;(b)adetailedhead
model scanned from the ground; (c) final merged 3D model of the temple scanned using a
laser range sensor mounted on a balloon.
12.3.1 Surface interpolation
One of the most common operations on surfaces is their reconstruction from a set of sparse
data constraints, i.e. scattered data interpolation. Whenformulating such problems, surfaces
may be parameterized as height fields f(x), as 3D parametric surfaces f(x), or as non-
parametric models suchas collections of triangles.
In the section on image processing, we saw how two-dimensional function interpolation
and approximation problems fd
i
g! f(x) could be cast as energy minimization problems
usingregularization (Section3.7.1 (3.943.98).
5
Suchproblems canalsospecifythelocations
of discontinuities in the surface as well as local orientation constraints (Terzopoulos1986b;
Zhang, Dugas-Phocion, Samson et al. 2002).
One approach to solving such problems is to discretize both the surface and the energy
on a discrete grid or mesh using finite element analysis (3.1003.102) (Terzopoulos1986b).
Such problems can then be solved using sparse system solving techniques, such as multigrid
(Briggs,Henson,andMcCormick2000) or hierarchically preconditioned conjugate gradient
(Szeliski2006b). The surface can also be represented using a hierarchical combination of
multilevel B-splines (Lee,Wolberg,andShin1996).
An alternative approach is to use radial basis (or kernel) functions (BoultandKender
1986; Nielson 1993). Tointerpolateafieldf(x)through(ornear)anumberofdatavalues
d
i
located at x
i
,the radial basis function approach uses
f(x) =
P
i
w
i
(x)d
i
P
i
w
i
(x)
;
(12.6)
5
The difference between interpolation and approximation is that the former requires the surface or function to
pass through thedata whilethe latterallowsthefunction to pass nearthe data,and can thereforebeused forsurface
smoothing as well.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages. This online VB tutorial
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
copy page from pdf; delete pages in pdf online
12.3 Surface representations
593
where the weights,
w
i
(x) = K(kx   x
i
k);
(12.7)
are computed using a radial basis (spherically symmetrical) function K(r).
If we want the function f(x) to exactly interpolate the data points, the kernel functions
must either be singular at the origin, lim
r!0
K(r) ! 1 (Nielson1993), or a dense linear
system must be solved to determine the magnitude associatedwith eachbasis function (Boult
and Kender 1986).Itturnsoutthat,forcertainregularizedproblems,e.g.,(3.943.96),there
exist radial basis functions (kernels) that give the same results as a full analytical solution
(BoultandKender1986). Unfortunately, because the dense system solving is cubic in the
number of data points, basis function approaches can only be used for small problems such
as feature-based image morphing (BeierandNeely1992).
When a three-dimensional parametric surface is being modeled, the vector-valued func-
tion f in (12.6) or (3.943.102) encodes 3D coordinates (x;y;z) on the surface and the
domain x = (s;t) encodes the surface parameterization. One example of such surfaces are
symmetry-seeking parametric models, which are elastically deformable versions of general-
ized cylinders
6
(Terzopoulos,Witkin,andKass1987). In these models, s is the parameter
along the spine of the deformable tube and t is the parameter around the tube. A variety of
smoothness and radial symmetry forces are used to constrain the model while it is fitted to
image-based silhouette curves.
It is also possible to define non-parametric surface models such as general triangulated
meshes and to equip such meshes (using finite element analysis) with both internal smooth-
ness metrics and externaldatafittingmetrics (SanderandZucker1990;FuaandSander1992;
Delingette, Hebert, and Ikeuichi 1992; McInerney and Terzopoulos 1993). Whilemostof
these approaches assume a standard elastic deformation model, which uses quadratic inter-
nal smoothness terms, it is also possible to use sub-linear energy models in order to better
preserve surface creases (Diebel,Thrun,andBr¨unig2006). Triangle meshes can also be aug-
mented with either spline elements (SullivanandPonce1998) or subdivision surfaces (Stoll-
nitz, DeRose, and Salesin 1996; Zorin, Schr¨oder, and Sweldens 1996; Warren and Weimer
2001; Peters and Reif 2008)toproducesurfaceswithbettersmoothnesscontrol.
Both parametric and non-parametric surface models assume that the topology of the sur-
face is known and fixed ahead of time. For more flexible surface modeling, we caneither rep-
resentthe surface as a collectionof orientedpoints (Section12.4) or use3Dimplicit functions
(Section12.5.1), whichcan also becombined withelastic 3Dsurface models (McInerneyand
Terzopoulos 1993).
6
Ageneralized cylinder(Brooks1981)is asolid of revolution,i.e.,theresultofrotating a(usuallysmooth)curve
around an axis. Itcan also be generated by sweeping aslowly varying circular cross-section along theaxis. (These
twointerpretations areequivalent.)
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages in pdf reader; delete blank pages from pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB library download and VB.NET online source code
acrobat remove pages from pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
594
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 12.11 Progressive mesh representation of an airplane model (Hoppe1996)  c 1996
ACM: (a) base mesh M
0
(150 faces); (b) mesh M
175
(500 faces); (c) mesh M
425
(1000
faces); (d) original mesh M = M
n
(13,546 faces).
12.3.2 Surface simplification
Once a triangle mesh has beencreated from 3D data, it is often desirable tocreate a hierarchy
of mesh models, for example, to control the displayed level of detail (LOD) in a computer
graphics application. (In essence, this is a 3D analog to image pyramids (Section3.5).) One
approach to doing this is to approximate a given mesh with one that has subdivision connec-
tivity, over whicha set of triangular waveletcoefficients can thenbe computed(Eck,DeRose,
Duchamp et al. 1995).Amorecontinuousapproachistousesequentialedgecollapseopera-
tions to go from the original fine-resolution mesh to a coarse base-level mesh (Hoppe1996).
The resulting progressive mesh (PM) representation can be used to render the 3D model at
arbitrary levels of detail, as shown in Figure12.11.
12.3.3 Geometry images
While multi-resolution surface representations such as (Eck,DeRose,Duchampetal.1995;
Hoppe 1996)supportlevelofdetailoperations,theystillconsistofanirregularcollectionof
triangles, whichmakes them moredifficult to compressandstoreina cache-efficientmanner.
7
To make the triangulation completely regular (uniform and gridded), Gu,Gortler, and
Hoppe(2002)describehowtocreategeometryimagesbycuttingsurfacemeshesalongwell-
chosen lines and “flattening” the resulting representation into a square. Figure12.12a shows
the resulting (x;y;z) values of the surface mesh mapped over the unit square, while Fig-
ure12.12b shows the associated (n
x
;n
y
;n
z
)normal map, i.e., the surface normals associ-
ated with each mesh vertex, which can be used to compensate for loss in visual fidelity if the
original geometry image is heavily compressed.
Subdivisiontriangulations,suchasthosein(Eck,DeRose,Duchampetal.1995),aresemi-regular,i.e.,regular
(ordered and nested)within each subdivided base triangle.
12.4 Point-based representations
595
(x;y;z)
+
(n
x
;n
y
;n
z
)
=)
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 12.12 Geometry images (Gu,Gortler,andHoppe2002)
c
2002ACM: (a) the257
257 geometry image defines a mesh over the surface; (b) the 512  512 normal map defines
vertex normals; (c) final lit 3D model.
12.4 Point-based representations
As we mentioned previously, triangle-based surface models assume that the topology (and
often the rough shape) of the 3D model is known ahead of time. While it is possible to
re-mesh a model as it is being deformed or fitted, a simpler solution is to dispense with an
explicit triangle mesh altogether and to have triangle vertices behave as oriented points, or
particles, or surface elements (surfels) (SzeliskiandTonnesen1992).
In order toendowthe resultingparticle system with internalsmoothness constraints, pair-
wise interaction potentials can be defined that approximate the equivalent elastic bending
energies that would be obtained using local finite-element analysis.8 Instead of defining the
finite elementneighborhoodfor eachparticle (vertex) ahead of time, a soft influence function
is used tocouple nearby particles. The resulting 3Dmodelcan change both topology and par-
ticle density as it evolves and can therefore be used to interpolate partial 3D data with holes
(Szeliski,Tonnesen,andTerzopoulos1993b). Discontinuities in both the surface orientation
and crease curves can also be modeled (Szeliski,Tonnesen,andTerzopoulos1993a).
To render the particle system as a continuous surface, local dynamic triangulation heuris-
tics (SzeliskiandTonnesen1992) or direct surface element splatting (Pfister,Zwicker,van
Baar et al. 2000)canbeused. Anotheralternativeistofirstconvertthepointcloudintoan
implicit signed distance or inside–outside function, using either minimum signed distances
to the oriented points (Hoppe,DeRose,Duchampetal.1992) or by interpolating a charac-
teristic (inside–outside) function using radial basis functions (TurkandO’Brien2002;Dinh,
Turk, and Slabaugh2002).Evengreaterprecisionovertheimplicitfunctionfitting,including
the ability to handle irregular point densities, can be obtained by computing a moving least
8Asmentionedbefore,analternativeistousesub-linearinteractionpotentials,whichencouragethepreservation
of surface creases (Diebel,Thrun,andBr¨unig2006).
596
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Figure 12.13 Point-basedsurfacemodelingwithmovingleastsquares(MLS) (Pauly,Keiser,
Kobbelt et al. 2003) c 2003ACM:(a)asetofpoints(blackdots)isturnedintoanimplicit
inside–outside function (black curve); (b) the signed distance to the nearest oriented point
can serve as an approximation to the inside–outside distance; (c) a set of oriented points
with variable sampling density representing a 3D surface (head model); (d) local estimate of
sampling density, which is used in the movingleast squares; (e) reconstructedcontinuous 3D
surface.
squares (MLS) estimate of the signed distance function (Alexa,Behr,Cohen-Oretal.2003;
Pauly, Keiser, Kobbelt et al. 2003), asshowninFigure12.13. Furtherimprovementscan
be obtained using local sphere fitting (GuennebaudandGross2007), faster and more accu-
rate re-sampling (Guennebaud,Germann,andGross2008), and kernel regression to better
tolerate outliers (Oztireli,Guennebaud,andGross2008).
12.5 Volumetric representations
Athird alternative for modeling 3D surfaces is to construct 3D volumetric inside–outside
functions. We alreadysaw examples of this in Section11.6.1, where we looked at voxel color-
ing (SeitzandDyer1999), space carving (KutulakosandSeitz2000), andlevel set (Faugeras
and Keriven 1998; Pons, Keriven, and Faugeras 2007)techniquesforstereomatching,and
Section11.6.2, where we discussed using binary silhouette images to reconstruct volumes.
In this section, we look at continuous implicit (inside–outside) functions to represent 3D
shape.
12.5.1 Implicit surfaces and level sets
While polyhedral and voxel-based representations can represent three-dimensional shapes
to an arbitrary precision, they lack some of the intrinsic smoothness properties available
with continuous implicit surfaces, which use an indicator function (characteristic function)
F(x;y;z) to indicate which 3D points are inside F(x;y;z) < 0 or outside F(x;y;z) > 0
12.5 Volumetric representations
597
the object.
An early example of using implicit functions to model 3D objects in computer vision are
superquadrics, which are a generalization of quadric (e.g., ellipsoidal) parametric volumetric
models,
F(x;y;z) =
x
a
1
2=
2
+
y
a
2
2=
2
!
2
=
1
+
x
a
1
2=
1
1 = 0
(12.8)
(Pentland1986;SolinaandBajcsy1990;WaitheandFerrie1991;Leonardis, Jakliˇc, and
Solina 1997).Thevaluesof(a
1
;a
2
;a
3
)control the extent of model along each (x;y;z) axis,
while the values of (
1
;
2
)control how “square” it is. To model a wider variety of shapes,
superquadrics are usually combinedwith either rigid or non-rigid deformations (Terzopoulos
andMetaxas 1991; Metaxas andTerzopoulos 2002).Superquadricmodelscaneitherbefitto
range data or used directly for stereo matching.
Adifferent kind of implicit shape model can be constructed by defining a signed distance
function over a regular three-dimensional grid, optionally using an octree spline to represent
this function more coarsely away from its surface (zero-set) (Lavall´eeandSzeliski1995;
Szeliski and Lavall´ee 1996; Frisken, Perry, Rockwood et al. 2000; Ohtake, Belyaev, Alexa
et al. 2003). Wehavealreadyseenexamplesofsigneddistancefunctionsbeingusedto
represent distance transforms (Section3.3.3), level sets for 2D contour fitting and tracking
(Section5.1.4), volumetric stereo (Section11.6.1), range data merging (Section12.2.1), and
point-based modeling (Section12.4). The advantage of representing such functions directly
on a grid is that it is quick and easy to look up distance function values for any (x;y;z)
location and alsoeasy to extract the isosurface usingthemarchingcubes algorithm (Lorensen
and Cline 1987). Theworkof Ohtake, Belyaev, Alexa et al.(2003)isparticularlynotable
since it allows for several distance functions to be used simultaneously and then combined
locallyto produce sharp features such as creases.
Poissonsurface reconstruction (Kazhdan,Bolitho,andHoppe2006) uses a closelyrelated
volumetric function, namely a smoothed 0/1 inside–outside (characteristic) function, which
can be thought of as a clipped signed distance function. The gradients for this function are
set to lie along oriented surface normals near known surface points and 0 elsewhere. The
function itself is represented using a quadratic tensor-product B-spline over an octree, which
provides a compact representation with larger cells away from the surface or in regions of
lower point density, and also admits the efficient solution of the related Poisson equations
(3.1003.102), see Section9.3.4 (P´erez,Gangnet,andBlake2003).
It is also possible to replace the quadratic penalties used in the Poisson equations with
L
1
(total variation) constraints and still obtain a convex optimization problem, which can be
solvedusingeither continuous (Zach,Pock,andBischof2007b;Zach2008) or discrete graph
cut (LempitskyandBoykov2007) techniques.
598
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Signed distancefunctions alsoplayan integralrole inlevel-set evolution equations ((Sec-
tions5.1.4 and11.6.1), where the values of distance transforms on the mesh are updated as
the surface evolves tofitmulti-viewstereo photoconsistency measures (FaugerasandKeriven
1998).
12.6 Model-based reconstruction
When we know something ahead of time about the objects we are trying to model, we can
construct more detailed and reliable 3D models using specialized techniques and representa-
tions. For example, architecture is usually made up of large planar regions and other para-
metric forms (such as surfaces of revolution), usually oriented perpendicular to gravity and
to each other (Section12.6.1). Heads and faces can be represented using low-dimensional,
non-rigid shape models, since the variability in shape and appearance of human faces, while
extremely large, is still bounded(Section12.6.2). Human bodies or parts, suchas hands, form
highly articulated structures, which can be represented using kinematic chains of piecewise
rigid skeletal elements linked by joints (Section12.6.4).
In this section, we highlight some of the main ideas, representations, and modeling algo-
rithms used for these three cases. Additional details and references can be found in special-
ized conferences and workshops devotedtothese topics, e.g., the International Symposium on
3DData Processing, Visualization, and Transmission (3DPVT), the International Conference
on 3D Digital Imaging and Modeling (3DIM), the International Conference on Automatic
Face andGesture Recognition (FG), the IEEE Workshop on Analysis and Modeling of Faces
andGestures, and the InternationalWorkshoponTracking Humans for the Evaluation of their
Motion in Image Sequences (THEMIS).
12.6.1 Architecture
Architectural modeling, especially from aerial photography, has been one of the longeststud-
ied problems in both photogrammetry and computer vision (WalkerandHerman1988). Re-
cently, the development of reliable image-based modeling techniques, as well as the preva-
lence of digital cameras and 3D computer games, has spurred renewed interest in this area.
The work byDebevec,Taylor,andMalik(1996) was one of the earliest hybridgeometry-
and image-based modeling and rendering systems. Their Fac¸ade system combines an inter-
active image-guided geometric modeling tool with model-based (local plane plus parallax)
stereo matchingand view-dependenttexture mapping. During the interactive photogrammet-
ric modeling phase, the user selects block elements and aligns their edges with visible edges
inthe input images (Figure12.14a). The system then automaticallycomputes thedimensions
and locations of the blocks along with the camera positions using constrained optimization
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested