c# pdf reader text : Delete pages in pdf reader control SDK system azure winforms wpf console SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft75-part653

14.8 Exercises
729
Ex 14.15: Tiny images Download the tiny images database from http://people.csail.mit.
edu/torralba/tinyimages/andbuildaclassifierbasedoncomparingyourtestimagesdirectly
against all of the labeled training images. Does this seem like a promising approach?
Delete pages in pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf file online; delete page in pdf file
Delete pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf; delete pdf pages in reader
730
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
reader extract pages from pdf; delete page pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages on pdf; delete page from pdf preview
Chapter 15
Conclusion
In this book, we have covered a broad range of computer vision topics. Starting with image
formation, we have seenhow images canbepre-processed to remove noise or blur, segmented
into regions, or converted into feature descriptors. Multiple images can be matched and
registered, with the results used to estimate motion, track people, reconstruct 3D models,
or merge images into more attractive and interesting composites and renderings. Images can
alsobe analyzed to produce semantic descriptions of their content. However, the gap between
computer andhumanperformance in this area is still large andis likelyto remainsofor many
years.
Our studyhas also exposed us to a wide range of mathematical techniques. These include
continuous mathematics, suchassignal processing, variational approaches, three-dimensional
and projective geometry, linear algebra, and least squares. We have also studied topics in
discrete mathematics and computer science, such as graph algorithms, combinatorial opti-
mization, and even database techniques for information retrieval. Since many problems in
computer vision are inverse problems that involve estimating unknown quantities from noisy
input data, we have also looked at Bayesian statistical inference techniques, as well as ma-
chine learning techniques to learn probabilistic models from large amounts of training data.
As the availability of partially labeled visual imagery on the Internet continues to increase
exponentially, this latter approach will continue to have a major impact on our field.
You may ask: why is our field so broad and aren’t there any unifying principles that can
be used to simplify our study? Part of the answer lies in the expansive definition of com-
puter vision, which is the analysis of images and video, as well as the incredible complexity
inherent in the formation of visual imagery. In some ways, our field is as complex as the
study of automotive engineering, which requires an understanding of internal combustion,
mechanics, aerodynamics, ergonomics, electrical circuitry, and control systems, among other
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages from pdf file; copy pages from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete page pdf online
732
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
topics. Computer vision similarly draws on a wide variety of sub-disciplines, which makes it
challenging to cover in a one-semester course, let alone to achieve mastery during a course
of graduate studies. Conversely, the incredible breadthand technical complexity of computer
vision problems is what draws many people to this research field.
Because of this richness and the difficulty in making and measuring progress, I have at-
tempted to instillinmystudents and in readers of this book adiscipline foundedon principles
from engineering, science, and statistics.
The engineering approach to problem solving is to first carefully define the overall prob-
lem being tackled and to question the basic assumptions and goals inherent in this process.
Once this has been done, a number of alternative solutions or approaches are implemented
and carefully tested, paying attention to issues such as reliability and computational cost.
Finally, one or more solutions are deployed and evaluated in real-world settings. For this
reason, this book contains many different alternatives for solving vision problems, many of
which are sketched out in the exercises for students to implement and test ontheir own.
The scientific approach builds upon a basic understanding of physical principles. In the
case of computer vision, this includes the physics of man-made and natural structures, image
formation, includinglightingandatmospheric effects, optics, andnoisy sensors. Thetaskis to
then invert this formation using stable and efficient algorithms to obtain reliable descriptions
of the scene and other quantities of interest. The scientific approach also encourages us to
formulateandtesthypotheses, whichissimilar tothe extensive testing andevaluationinherent
in engineering disciplines.
Lastly, because so much about the image formation process is inherently uncertain and
ambiguous, a statistical approach that models both uncertainty in the world (e.g., the number
andtypes of animals in a picture) andnoise in the image formation process, is often essential.
Bayesian inference techniques can then be used to combine prior and measurement models
to estimate the unknowns and to model their uncertainty. Machine learning techniques can
be used to create the probabilistic models in the first place. Efficient learning and inference
algorithms, such as dynamic programming, graph cuts, and belief propagation, often play a
crucial role in this process.
Given the breadth of material we have covered in this book, what new developments are
we likely to see in the future? As I have mentioned before, one of the recent trends in com-
puter vision is using the massive amounts of partially labeled visual data on the Internet as
sources for learning visual models of scenes and objects. We have already seen data-driven
approaches succeed in related fields such as speech recognition, machine translation, speech
andmusic synthesis, and evencomputer graphics (both inimage-based rendering and anima-
tion from motion capture). A similar process has been occurring in computer vision, with
some of the most exciting new work occurring at the intersection of the object recognition
and machine learning fields.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete page in pdf reader; delete page in pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete page from pdf online; delete pdf pages android
15 Conclusion
733
More traditional quantitative techniques in computer vision such as motion estimation,
stereo correspondence, and image enhancement, all benefit from better prior models for im-
ages, motions, and disparities, as well as efficient statistical inference techniques such as
those for inhomogeneous and higher-order Markov random fields. Some techniques, such as
feature matching and structure from motion, have matured to where they can be applied to
almost arbitrary collections of images of static scenes. This has resulted in an explosion of
workin3D modeling from Internet datasets, whichagain is related tovisual recognitionfrom
massive amounts of data.
While these are all encouraging developments, the gap between human and machine per-
formance in semantic scene understanding remains large. It may be many years before com-
puters can name and outline all of the objects in a photograph with the same skill as a two-
year-old child. However, we have to remember that human performance is often the result of
many years of training andfamiliarity and often works best in special ecologically important
situations. For example, while humans appear to be experts at face recognition, our actual
performance when shown people we do not know well is not that good. Combining vision
algorithms with general inference techniques that reason about the real world will likely lead
to more breakthroughs, although some of the problems may turn out to be “AI-complete”, in
the sense that a full emulation of human experience and intelligence may be necessary.
Whatever the outcome of these research endeavors, computer vision is already having
atremendous impact in many areas, including digital photography, visual effects, medical
imaging, safety and surveillance, and Web-based search. The breadth of the problems and
techniques inherent in this field, combined with the richness of the mathematics and the
utility of the resulting algorithms, will ensure that this remains an exciting area of study for
years to come.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
add and remove pages from a pdf; pdf delete page
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from a pdf
734
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Appendix A
Linear algebra and numerical
techniques
A.1 Matrix decompositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736
A.1.1 Singular value decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736
A.1.2 Eigenvalue decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737
A.1.3 QR factorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 740
A.1.4 Cholesky factorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 741
A.2 Linear least squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742
A.2.1 Total least squares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 744
A.3 Non-linear least squares. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746
A.4 Direct sparse matrix techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 747
A.4.1 Variable reordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748
A.5 Iterative techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748
A.5.1 Conjugate gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 749
A.5.2 Preconditioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 751
A.5.3 Multigrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753
736
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
In this appendix, we introduce some elements of linear algebra and numericaltechniques that
are used elsewhere in the book. We start with some basic decompositions in matrix algebra,
including the singular value decomposition (SVD), eigenvalue decompositions, and other
matrix decompositions (factorizations). Next, we look at the problem of linear least squares,
whichcanbe solvedusing either the QR decomposition or normalequations. This is followed
bynon-linear leastsquares, which arise when the measurement equations are not linear in the
unknowns or when robust error functions are used. Such problems require iteration to find
asolution. Next, we look at direct solution (factorization) techniques for sparse problems,
wherethe ordering of thevariables can have a large influence onthe computationand memory
requirements. Finally, we discuss iterative techniques for solving large linear (or linearized)
least squares problems. Good general references for much of this material include the work
byBj¨orck (1996),GolubandVanLoan(1996),TrefethenandBau (1997),Meyer(2000),
Nocedal and Wright(2006),and Bj¨orck and Dahlquist(2010).
Anote on vector and matrix indexing. Tobeconsistentwiththerestofthebookand
with the general usage in the computer science and computer vision communities, I adopt
a0-based indexing scheme for vector and matrix element indexing. Please note that most
mathematical textbooks and papers use 1-based indexing, so you need to be aware of the
differences when you read this book.
Software implementations. Highlyoptimizedandtestedlibrariescorrespondingtotheal-
gorithms described in this appendix are readily available and are listed in AppendixC.2.
A.1 Matrix decompositions
In order to better understand the structure of matrices and more stably perform operations
such as inversion and system solving, a number of decompositions (or factorizations) can be
used. In this section, we review singular value decomposition(SVD), eigenvalue decomposi-
tion, QR factorization, and Cholesky factorization.
A.1.1 Singular value decomposition
One of the most useful decompositions in matrixalgebra is the singular value decomposition
(SVD), which states that any real-valued M  N matrix A can be written as
A
MN
=
U
MP
PP
V
T
PN
(A.1)
A.1 Matrix decompositions
737
=
2
6
4
u
0

u
p 1
3
7
5
2
6
6
4
0
.
.
.
p 1
3
7
7
5
2
6
4
v
T
0

vT
p 1
3
7
5
;
where P = min(M;N). The matrices U and V are orthonormal, i.e., U
T
U = I and
V
T
V = I, and so are their column vectors,
u
i
u
j
=v
i
v
j
=
ij
:
(A.2)
The singular values are all non-negative and can be ordered in decreasing order
0

1
  
p 1
0:
(A.3)
Ageometric intuition for the SVD of a matrix A can be obtained by re-writing A =
UV
T
in (A.2) as
AV = U
or Av
j
=
j
u
j
:
(A.4)
This formula says that the matrix A takes any basis vector v
j
and maps it to a direction u
j
with length
j
,as shown in FigureA.1
If only the first r singular values are positive, the matrix A is of rank r and the index p
in the SVD decomposition (A.2) can be replaced by r. (In other words, we can drop the last
p  r columns of U and V .)
An important property of the singular value decomposition of a matrix (also true for
the eigenvalue decomposition of a real symmetric non-negative definite matrix) is that if we
truncate the expansion
A=
Xt
j=0
j
u
j
v
T
j
;
(A.5)
we obtain the best possible least squares approximation to the original matrix A. This is
used both in eigenface-based face recognition systems (Section14.2.1) and in the separable
approximation of convolution kernels (3.21).
A.1.2 Eigenvalue decomposition
If the matrix C is symmetric (m = n),
1
it can be written as an eigenvalue decomposition,
C
=
UU
T
=
2
6
4
u
0

u
n 1
3
7
5
2
6
6
4
0
.
.
.
n 1
3
7
7
5
2
6
4
u
T
0

u
T
n 1
3
7
5
=
n 1
i=0
i
u
i
u
T
i
:
(A.6)
1
In thisappendix, we denote symmetricmatrices usingC and general rectangularmatrices using A.
738
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
v
0
v
1
u
0
u
1
σ
0
σ
1
A
Figure A.1 The action of a matrix A can be visualized by thinking of the domain as being
spannedby aset of orthonormal vectors v
j
,each of which is transformed to a neworthogonal
vector u
j
with a length 
j
. When A is interpreted as a covariance matrix and its eigenvalue
decomposition is performed, each of the u
j
axes denote a principal direction (component)
and each 
j
denotes one standard deviation along that direction.
(The eigenvector matrix U is sometimes written as  and the eigenvectors u as .) In this
case, the eigenvalues
0

1
  
n 1
(A.7)
can be both positive and negative.2
Aspecial case of the symmetric matrix C occurs when it is constructed as the sum of a
number of outer products
C=
X
i
a
i
a
T
i
=AA
T
;
(A.8)
whichoftenoccurs when solving least squares problems (AppendixA.2), where the matrixA
consists of all the a
i
column vectors stackedside-by-side. Inthis case, we are guaranteedthat
all of the eigenvalues 
i
are non-negative. The associated matrix C is positive semi-definite
x
T
Cx  0; 8x:
(A.9)
If the matrix C is of full rank, the eigenvalues are all positive and the matrix is called sym-
metric positive definite (SPD).
Symmetric positive semi-definite matrices also arise in the statistical analysis of data,
since they represent the covariance of a set of fx
i
gpoints around their mean x,
C=
1
n
X
i
(x
i
x)(x
i
x)
T
:
(A.10)
In this case, performing the eigenvalue decompositionis knownas principal component anal-
ysis (PCA), since it models the principal directions (andmagnitudes) of variation of the point
Eigenvaluedecompositionscanbecomputedfornon-symmetricmatricesbuttheeigenvaluesandeigenvectors
can have complex entries in thatcase.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested